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Read   /rɛd/  /rid/   Listen
Read

verb
(past & past part. read; pres. part. reading)
1.
Interpret something that is written or printed.  "Have you read Salman Rushdie?"
2.
Have or contain a certain wording or form.  Synonym: say.  "What does the law say?"
3.
Look at, interpret, and say out loud something that is written or printed.
4.
Obtain data from magnetic tapes.  Synonym: scan.
5.
Interpret the significance of, as of palms, tea leaves, intestines, the sky; also of human behavior.  "I can't read his strange behavior" , "The fortune teller read his fate in the crystal ball"
6.
Interpret something in a certain way; convey a particular meaning or impression.  Synonym: take.  "How should I take this message?" , "You can't take credit for this!"
7.
Be a student of a certain subject.  Synonyms: learn, study, take.
8.
Indicate a certain reading; of gauges and instruments.  Synonyms: record, register, show.  "The gauge read 'empty'"
9.
Audition for a stage role by reading parts of a role.
10.
To hear and understand.
11.
Make sense of a language.  Synonyms: interpret, translate, understand.  "Can you read Greek?"



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"Read" Quotes from Famous Books



... Court, Grub Street," Lavinia read; "Sir,—I give you notiss that if you do nott pay me my nine weeks' rent you owe me by twelve o'clock to-morrer I shall at wunce take possesshun and have innstruckted the sheriff's offiser in ackordance therewith. ...
— Madame Flirt - A Romance of 'The Beggar's Opera' • Charles E. Pearce

... Echizen, Hikone, and other loyal clans. After a battle which lasted several days, and which raged chiefly about the imperial palace, the Choshu troops were completely defeated and forced to retire. It gives us an idea of the terrible earnestness of these Japanese warriors to read how a little remnant of the Choshu troops took refuge on Tennozan; and when they heard their pursuers approaching, how seventeen of them committed hara-kiri(302); and lest their heads should be recognized and their names disgraced, how they had thrown themselves into the ...
— Japan • David Murray

... if the story were not complete, the conclusion of the last Canto of the sixth Book, evidently the work of a later hand than Valmiki's, which speaks of Rama's glorious and happy reign and promises blessings to those who read and hear the Ramayan, would be sufficient to show that, when these verses were added, the poem was considered to be finished. The Uttarakanda or Last Book is merely an appendix or a supplement and relates only events antecedent ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... farmhouse where her mother died and were using one of the upstairs rooms as a 'den.' They got in through a cellar window, it seems. They were each writing a novel, and that was where they worked and read what they had written to each other. That lasted only about six weeks or so before Mr. Windom found out about it. He was terrible. You see, without knowing it, they had picked out the room that was most sacred to him. It was his wife's own room,—where she died and where Alix's ...
— Quill's Window • George Barr McCutcheon

... means at the command of Poliziano and his musical associates. The study of this entire matter calls for care and judgment, for it is involved in a mass of misinformation, lack of any information and ill grounded conclusions. For example, we read in a foot-note of Rolland's excellent work [18] that in March, 1518, the "Suppositi" of Ariosto was performed at the Vatican before Pope Leo with musical intermezzi. The author quotes from a letter of Pauluzo, envoy of the ...
— Some Forerunners of Italian Opera • William James Henderson

... I gravely, "but I have read his so-called poems." She frowned. "Horace calls the jack," I continued, "lupus, the wolf-fish, as one may say, and a very good name too. Doubtless madam ...
— The Yeoman Adventurer • George W. Gough

... when I read the directions for planting I found that it would be impossible. They should be planted in hills, and ...
— More Toasts • Marion Dix Mosher

... there is always a loss and offset from education in its narrow sense. Petrie, speaking from observation and experience of Egyptian peasants, says: "The harm is that you manufacture idiots. Some of the peasantry are taught to read and write, and the result of this burden, which their fathers bore not, is that they become fools. I cannot say this too plainly: An Egyptian who has had reading and writing thrust on him is, in every case that I have met with, half-witted, ...
— Folkways - A Study of the Sociological Importance of Usages, Manners, Customs, Mores, and Morals • William Graham Sumner

... friend said, when Mrs. Grey had gone, "if you will have nothing to eat or to drink, you must go to bed and see what a sound night's rest will do for you. I am going to sit up a little while to read, but ...
— Prince Fortunatus • William Black

... read papers before learned bodies and have them printed. And you come with as silly a story as a Staffordshire peasant who thinks someone has been trying to poison him because he's got a stomach-ache. ...
— The Magician • Somerset Maugham

... to Boswell:—'Sir, in my early years I read very hard. It is a sad reflection, but a true one, that I knew almost as much at eighteen as I do now' (post, July 21, 1763). He told Mr. Langton, that 'his great period of study was from the age of twelve ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... Its sharpest end was always in front; and it split our society from end to end the moment it had entrance at all. As I have said he was long unheard of; but he had not the tragedy of many authors, who were heard of long before they were heard. When you had read any Shaw you read all Shaw. When you had seen one of his plays you waited for more. And when he brought them out in volume form, you did what is repugnant to any literary ...
— George Bernard Shaw • Gilbert K. Chesterton

... The evenings were merry, but the mornings were occupied. Guy went off to his room, as he used to do last winter; Laura commenced some complicated perspective, or read a German book with a great deal of dictionary; Amy had a book of history, and practised her music diligently; even Charles read more to himself, and resumed the study with Guy and Amy; Lady Eveleen joined in every one's pursuits, enjoyed them, ...
— The Heir of Redclyffe • Charlotte M. Yonge

... century by Crinitus, Pontanus, and Volaterranus, attacked by Alciat, for the honor of the law; and defended by Baronius, (A.D. 561, No. 2, &c.,) for the honor of the church. Yet Tzetzes himself had read in other chronicles, that Belisarius did not lose his sight, and that he recovered his fame and fortunes. * Note: I know not where Gibbon found Tzetzes to be a monk; I suppose he considered his bad ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 4 • Edward Gibbon

... Fig. 77. The idea with this form of index hand is, the bent-down jaws B', Fig. 77, grasp the fork as close to the pallet staff as possible, making an allowance for the acting center by so placing the index arc that the hand A will read correctly on the index D. Suppose, for instance, we place the jaws B' inside the pallet staff, we then place the index arc so the hand reads to the arc indicated by the dotted arc m, Fig. 78, and if set outside of the pallet staff, read by ...
— Watch and Clock Escapements • Anonymous

... multitudes of floating frost particles, and the tramp through the forest speedily brought the roses back to her cheeks. Bill carried the bundle of linen on his back, and trudged steadily through the woods. But the riddle of his destination was soon read to her, for a two-mile walk brought them out on the shore of a fair-sized lake, on the farther side of which loomed the conical ...
— North of Fifty-Three • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... Livingstone having been read by the Secretary at a meeting of the Russian Geographical Society cordially recognizing his merit, the whole assembly—a very large one—by rising, paid a last tribute of respect to his memory.—Lancet, 7th ...
— The Personal Life Of David Livingstone • William Garden Blaikie

... mischief,—because," said she, kindling with sudden anger, "the whole business was founded on lies and false pretensions. I don't mean only these river-guardians, but all these master-people I have read of." ...
— News from Nowhere - or An Epoch of Rest, being some chapters from A Utopian Romance • William Morris

... their kind; and his analysis of the Iphigenia in Aulis overture can never be surpassed. Stage-managers have found his directions for the performing of Tannhaeuser, Lohengrin and the Dutchman invaluable; they are also sometimes read by conductors, and should be read by singers. They show how in composing his operas Wagner meant every note he put to paper: the most minute fibres of the musical growth are alive, a living ...
— Richard Wagner - Composer of Operas • John F. Runciman

... delighted with the trout, and enjoyed a high feast almost every day. Mrs. Mayburn, imagining that she had divined Graham's wish, read from his letters glowing extracts which apparently revealed an ...
— His Sombre Rivals • E. P. Roe

... 'That's what she wrote me. In fact she sent me the old chap's letter to read. So I reckoned it cost him most all ...
— Leonora • Arnold Bennett

... the plain truth. When I used to read about the horrors of living in a solitary house in the country, I little thought how much of the same terror I should feel from living solitary in a house in a village. You wonder what could happen to me, I dare say; and perhaps it would not be very easy to suppose ...
— Deerbrook • Harriet Martineau

... answer, but passed the strip of paper across to him, and Breckenridge's pulses throbbed fast with anger as he read: "It is quite difficult to sit on both sides of the fence, and the boys have no more use for you. Still, there was a time when you did what you could for us, and that is why I am giving you good advice. Sit tight at Fremont, and ...
— The Cattle-Baron's Daughter • Harold Bindloss

... effect, he might as well have read Dr. Watts's Cradle-hymn to a couple of fighting bulldogs. The proposition of compensated emancipation was thirty years too late. Now the blood of both sections was up, the fighting animal in man let loose,—and they ...
— The Negro and the Nation - A History of American Slavery and Enfranchisement • George S. Merriam

... curtly, having glanced over the paper, "save me and yourself any further annoyance. I could have told you how far the property was warranted, before I read the paper; and I remember making some very particular remarks when selling that item in the invoice. A nigger's intelligence is often a mere item of consideration in the amount he brings under the hammer; but we never warrant ...
— Our World, or, The Slaveholders Daughter • F. Colburn Adams

... easy to read as a book. The sign was never wanting for more than three steps at a time, and Hal Dozier, reading skillfully, watched the decreasing distance between heel indentations, a sure sign that the fugitive was growing weak ...
— Way of the Lawless • Max Brand

... other thing that I meant to tell you," he said; "something that perhaps you know already. I'm pretty busy and I don't always find time to read the local news. So it's not unusual that I didn't know before. Steve ...
— The Dominant Dollar • Will Lillibridge

... Omaha ever knew how to take a joke. The first time Tom went down, he was called in very solemnly to explain again about the name, and being in a hurry and very tired of the whole business, Tom spluttered: "Hang it, don't bother me any more about that name! If you can't read it make it Sankey, ...
— Golden Stories - A Selection of the Best Fiction by the Foremost Writers • Various

... column his eye falls upon a paragraph at sight of which he gives so deep a snort that Doctor Lake swings about from where he is shaving before a hand mirror hung on a tree limb and wants to know whether the judge has happened upon disagreeable tidings. What the judge has read is a small ...
— Sundry Accounts • Irvin S. Cobb

... "No, do not read it me. What is the use? He has made her quarrel with me. Julia cares nothing now for me, or for my angel. Why should she care? When she came home we would not see her. Of course she will not care. Who is there ...
— The Claverings • Anthony Trollope

... therewith once or twice a day, it not only takes away all hot Rhumes and Inflamations, but also preserveth the Eye after a most wonderful manner; a Secret which was used by a most Learned Bishop: By the help of which Water he could read without the use of spectacles at 90 years of Age. A Bottle of which will cost but ...
— The accomplisht cook - or, The art & mystery of cookery • Robert May

... that. I should have read him better. I had always dawdled. I trusted to the future, instead of acting. What chance had I against a ...
— Jacqueline of Golden River • H. M. Egbert

... if in acknowledgment of a highly satisfactory explanation. "Oh? reading a story? People who read stories are said to have excitable brains. Should ...
— Heart and Science - A Story of the Present Time • Wilkie Collins

... development, and took time. Next in his regard, after the children, was Judge Scott. There were two reasons, possibly, for this. First, he was evidently a valuable possession of the master's, and next, he was undemonstrative. White Fang liked to lie at his feet on the wide porch when he read the newspaper, from time to time favouring White Fang with a look or a word—untroublesome tokens that he recognised White Fang's presence and existence. But this was only when the master was not around. When the master appeared, all other beings ceased ...
— White Fang • Jack London

... gallery with its light. A diamond on one of Sydney's clasped hands winked as gayly as if a tragedy were not filling the girl's heart. Then oft-read ...
— A Tar-Heel Baron • Mabell Shippie Clarke Pelton

... The common fate of all things rare May read in thee; How small a part of time they share, That are so wondrous sweet ...
— The Poetical Works of Henry Kirke White - With a Memoir by Sir Harris Nicolas • Henry Kirke White

... come into relation with a person, the more necessary do tact and courtesy become. Except in cases of necessity, which are rare, leave your friend to learn unpleasant truths from his enemies; they are ready enough to tell them. Good-breeding never forgets that amour-propre is universal. When you read the story of the Archbishop and Gil Blas, you may laugh, if you will, at the poor old man's delusion; but don't forget that the youth was the greater fool of the two, and that his master served such a booby rightly in turning him out ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. I., No. 3, January 1858 - A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics • Various

... in history more profoundly melancholy than the loss of the ship, driven by the pitiless wind of fate, on which Theodosia had taken passage for her southern home. Yet one is shocked at the unnatural parent who instructs his daughter to read, in the event of his death in the duel with Hamilton, the confidential letters which came to him in the course of his love intrigues and affairs of gallantry. It imports a moral obliquity that, happily for society, is found in few human beings. As he lived, so he died, ...
— A Political History of the State of New York, Volumes 1-3 • DeAlva Stanwood Alexander

... read how, with an immense procession passing up Broadway, the streets lined with people, and the bands playing their loudest, Horace Greeley would sit upon the steps of the Astor House, use the top of his hat for a desk, and write an editorial for the New York Tribune which would be quoted all ...
— The True Citizen, How To Become One • W. F. Markwick, D. D. and W. A. Smith, A. B.

... and truth became conspicuous, even when the intention was to show them grovelling and degraded. These pastorals became popular, and were read with delight, as just representations of rural manners and occupations, by those who had no interest in the rivalry of the poets, nor knowledge of ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes - Volume the Eighth: The Lives of the Poets, Volume II • Samuel Johnson

... and motor cars. At Compiegne, where the home of the Orsetti family was sacked, silver plate, jewellery and articles of value were collected in the courtyard of the chateau, then classified, registered, packed and "put into two carts, upon which they took care to place the Red Cross flag." We read in the note-book of a wounded German soldier, under medical treatment at Brussels, "A car has arrived at the hospital, bringing war booty, a piano, two sewing machines and ...
— Their Crimes • Various

... of the expedition is here referred to; but it is likely that the open glade in which Captain Clark first struck the low country of the west is here meant. It was here that he met the Indian boys hiding in the grass, and from here he led the expedition out of the wilderness. For "quamash" read "camass," an edible root much prized by the Nez Perces ...
— First Across the Continent • Noah Brooks

... of mid-wifery can only learn a few general principles, before he gets into the field of experience. Actual contact with labor teaches him that much that he has read and had told to him by professors of mid-wifery in the lectures, is of but little use to him at the bedside. What he needs to know is, what he will have to do after he gets there. He must know the form and size of the bones of a woman, how large a hole ...
— Philosophy of Osteopathy • Andrew T. Still

... Science, Vol. II. p. 145. The figures, which in the English system of numeration read as seventeen billions, would in the American system read as ...
— The Unseen World and Other Essays • John Fiske

... Martineau had remained with him for some time, and that during her stay, she had professed very different, or at least more modified opinions on the subject of slavery, than those she has expressed in her book: so much so, that one day, having read a letter from Boston cautioning her against being cajoled by the hospitality and pleasant society of the Western States, she handed it to him, saying, "They want to make a regular abolitionist of me." "When her work came out," continued ...
— Diary in America, Series One • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... Few who read this book have ever been in contact with actual war. In order that they may have an idea of what happens to a city which finds itself in the path of an irresistible enemy, some account will be given here of what happened to Reims, ...
— A Journey Through France in War Time • Joseph G. Butler, Jr.

... with the Innominato again,' said Philip. Every subject seemed to excite Guy to a dangerous extent, as Laura thought, and she turned to Philip to ask if he would not read ...
— The Heir of Redclyffe • Charlotte M. Yonge

... disputes the presence of kindly Germans in the Kaiser's armies, and it is pleasing to read about these acts of generosity in relieving distress which is entirely the result of Germany's guilt. But the point which all German writers miss is the explanation of positive evidence of brutal deeds. Their kindly incidents and proofs of German chivalry are all of a negative ...
— What Germany Thinks - The War as Germans see it • Thomas F. A. Smith

... Charlie. "You are well qualified for it; and you always have taken an interest in politics ever since you read the Life of Jefferson. Where do they want you ...
— The Bobbin Boy - or, How Nat Got His learning • William M. Thayer

... priest was passed over with indifference; and so far from exacting obedience in her ministers to a higher standard than she required of ordinary persons, the church extended her limits under fictitious pretexts as a sanctuary for lettered villany. Every person who could read was claimed by prescriptive usage as a clerk, and shielded under her protecting mantle; nor was any clerk amenable for the worst crimes to the secular jurisdiction, until he had been first tried and degraded by the ecclesiastical ...
— The Reign of Henry the Eighth, Volume 1 (of 3) • James Anthony Froude

... doth well dispense With lovers' long discourse; Much, speech hath some defence Though beauty no remorse. All do not all things well; Some measures comely tread, Some knotted riddles tell, Some poems smoothly read. The summer hath his joys And winter his delights; Though love and all his pleasures are but ...
— Lyrics from the Song-Books of the Elizabethan Age • Various

... quite enough for me; I told papa so, I shan't think of music; I shall think of poor Mr. Kane. Mr. Carlyle I know you can be kind if you like; I know you would rather be kind than otherwise—it is to be read in your face. Try and do what ...
— East Lynne • Mrs. Henry Wood

... (5 vols.); on the third desk (4 vols.); on the fifth desk (4 vols.); Books taken out of the library partly to be placed in the cloister, partly to be divided among the brethren (27 vols.); Books on the small desks in the cloister (5 vols.); Books to be read publicly in convent or to be divided among the brethren for private reading (99 vols.)." These different collections of MSS., added together, make a total of 740 volumes, which seem to have been scattered over the House, wherever ...
— The Care of Books • John Willis Clark

... 18th Brumaire a great number of military, amounting to about 10,000 men, were assembled in the gardens of the Tuileries, and were reviewed by Bonaparte, accompanied by Generals Beurnonville, Moreau, and Macdonald. Bonaparte read to them the decree just issued by the commission of inspectors of the Council of the Ancients, by which the legislative body was removed to St. Cloud; and by which he himself was entrusted with the execution of that decree, ...
— Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte, Complete • Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne

... expected that either the mute language of early Christianity (however important a part of the expression of the building at the time of its erection), or the delicate fancies of the Gothic leafage springing into new life, should be read, or perceived, by the passing traveller who has never been taught to expect anything in architecture except five orders: yet he can hardly fail to be struck by the simplicity and dignity of the great shafts themselves; ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume II (of 3) • John Ruskin

... the reader in discovering the eclectic view-point and critical conservatism of an investigator lies in the confidence which these qualities beget in the reliability of results. One can read most of "The Individual Delinquent" to learn facts without the distraction of critical uncertainty. With this in mind, therefore, a few of his conclusions, picked mostly at random, may be quoted. An important factor ...
— The Journal of Abnormal Psychology - Volume 10

... he was prior to 1859," writes Sir Harry. This statement is not true. Speculation about God, the meaning of life, the social import of Christianity, was never more rife amongst educated people. Here I must check myself: what does "educated" mean? To be able to read and write, and say "Hear, hear" at public meetings? To have a pretty idea of the positions of Huxley and Haeckel by which to confound the poor old Bible? If by education we mean the exposition of some special branch of the physical sciences, the statement may be true. If we mean men and women with ...
— Mountain Meditations - and some subjects of the day and the war • L. Lind-af-Hageby

... opinion, the thing to do is to clean this town up, and give the business men and mills a chance to start up again. When this is done people can earn their own living, and charity ceases. I am backed up in this statement by Irwin Hurrell, who is a burgess of Johnstown, and knows everybody. Let me read you something from my note book ...
— The Johnstown Horror • James Herbert Walker

... he had somewhere before seen the same hand, but in his present hurry of spirits could not recollect whose it was, nor did the lady give him any time for reflection; for he had scarce read the letter when she produced a little bit of paper and cried out, "Here, sir, here are the contents which he fears will offend me." She then put a bank-bill of a hundred pounds into Mr. Booth's hands, and asked him with ...
— Amelia (Complete) • Henry Fielding

... occupied his attention first. The sun was down, and the light declining, but in front of the window there was still enough to enable him to read he opened ...
— The White Chief - A Legend of Northern Mexico • Mayne Reid

... apples, oranges, bananas, grapes, and flowers. None of them ever had seen a table like that. Then when dinner was over, Kate sat before the fire and in her clear voice, with fine inflections, she read from the Big Book the story of the guiding star and the little child in the manger. Then she told stories, and they played games until four o'clock; and then Adam rolled all of the children into the big wagon bed mounted on the sled runners, and took them home. Then he came back and finished the ...
— A Daughter of the Land • Gene Stratton-Porter

... the war in their own way. They despatched three notes in quick succession to the Bucharest government, one of which reads like a peevish indictment hastily drafted before the evidence had been sifted or even carefully read. It raked up many of the old accusations that had been leveled against the Rumanians, tacked them on to the crime of insubordination, and without waiting for an answer—assuming, in fact, that there could be no satisfactory answer—summoned them ...
— The Inside Story Of The Peace Conference • Emile Joseph Dillon

... British Museum, show refined restraint; on the other hand, the mosaic portraits of the emperor and Theodora show crowns and jewels of full Oriental style, and the description of the splendid fittings of St Sophia read like an eastern tale. Goldsmith's work was executed on such a scale for the great church as to form parts of the architecture of the interior. The altar was wholly of gold, and its ciborium and the iconastasis were of silver. ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 - "Bulgaria" to "Calgary" • Various

... fourth chapter of Macaulay's History of England we read of King Charles II. that "he might be seen before the dew was off the grass in St. James's Park, striding among the trees playing with his Spaniels and flinging corn to his ducks, and these exhibitions endeared him to the common ...
— Dogs and All About Them • Robert Leighton

... enforced moment of rest together at the water hole—which might as well have been a thousand miles from help as ten—that little chills did run up and down her back. As for her companion, it was useless to try to read him from his face or manner; if she were playing one game, he might well be playing another as far as anything she could gather from his features was concerned. But she had to confess there was never a look in his eyes—when she did look into them—that ...
— Laramie Holds the Range • Frank H. Spearman

... one bright morning in June she might have been seen, prim and proper—almost glorified, she felt, as she set her lips just right in the mirror—making for the Pipestave Pond, Bible in hand and spectacles clean wiped, ready to read appropriate selections to ...
— Rolf In The Woods • Ernest Thompson Seton

... have wondered how Shakespeare or Fletcher came to write of the "bells" of a primrose. Mr. W.J. Linton proposed "With harebell slim": although if we must read "harebell" or "harebells," "dim" would be a pretty and proper word for the color of that flower. The conjecture takes some little plausibility from Shakespeare's elsewhere ...
— Adventures in Criticism • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... The queen read this strange note aloud, again and again exclaiming, "What does the man mean? He must be insane!" She quietly lighted the note at a wax taper which was standing near her, and burned it, remarking that it was not worth keeping. Afterward, as she reflected more upon the enigmatical ...
— Maria Antoinette - Makers of History • John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott

... are briefly but fully set forth under three heads. (1) By doing no harm. (2) By doing good. (3) "By attending all the ordinances of God: such as, the public worship of God; the ministry of the word, either read or expounded; the Supper of the Lord; family and private prayer; searching the Scriptures, and fasting or abstinence. These are the general rules of our societies, all of which we are taught of God to observe, even in His written ...
— The Story of My Life - Being Reminiscences of Sixty Years' Public Service in Canada • Egerton Ryerson

... my cousin aside and read the contents to him. On hearing the message, he was even more agitated and anxious than I had been. We then called up the Indian and questioned him. He had found his chief, he said, and faithfully delivered the message entrusted to him. Kanimapo ...
— The Young Llanero - A Story of War and Wild Life in Venezuela • W.H.G. Kingston

... splendid opportunities to use their recently acquired knowledge in a practical way. Elmer Chenoweth, a lad from the northwest woods, astonishes everyone by his familiarity with camp life. A clean, wholesome story every boy should read. ...
— The Wonder Island Boys: The Tribesmen • Roger Finlay

... knowing as I do the soundness of your understanding, the quickness of your conception, and the consequences that must follow, which, acute as you are, you could not but foresee, I was amazed when I read your advertisement!' ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... ready to die in my despair, when a paper in which you were spoken of insultingly, drew my attention to your articles: To the Dead and To Her Whom We Loved. I wept with joy as I read them; I am not then left alone to suffer? I am not solitary?—You do believe; then, my dear Sir, tell me that you still have faith in these things. They really exist, and cannot be destroyed? I must tell you how much good it does me to know that; for I ...
— Clerambault - The Story Of An Independent Spirit During The War • Rolland, Romain

... cases were reported. There were 30 cases of black smallpox. Many of the patients were blinded or disfigured for life; 224 died. We find in the annual report of the Board of Health for that year: "It was the smallpox we read about, that terrible scourge which struck terror into the former generations. Its contagious nature showed itself everywhere. One case, if not promptly reported to the health office and removed to the ...
— Health Work in the Public Schools • Leonard P. Ayres and May Ayres

... has a good understanding of Lingua Terra," Paula was saying. "He and Dr. Murillo conversed bi-lingually, just as I've heard General von Schlichten and King Kankad talking to one another. I haven't any idea whether or not Gorkrink could read Lingua Terra, or, if so, what papers or ...
— Ullr Uprising • Henry Beam Piper

... strain is increased, and at the same time the pointer moves around the dial, which indicates in pounds the amount of strain. When the threads of the hank begin to break, the strain is released, and the catch at the side keeps the pointer in position until the amount of strain is read on the dial. The distance stretched by the yarn before breakage occurs is shown in inches and fractions of an inch, in the small indicator arranged near ...
— Textiles • William H. Dooley

... dreary labyrinth of doubt, and, whichever way I turned, no reasonable prospect of extricating myself appeared. The means by which I had brought myself into this situation may be very briefly told; I had inquired into many matters, in order that I might become wise, and I had read and pondered over the words of the wise, so called, till I had made myself master of the sum of human wisdom; namely, that everything is enigmatical and that man is an enigma to himself; thence the cry of 'What is truth?' I had ceased to believe in the truth of ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... and with just the faintest suggestion of a smile lurking about her lips and in her eyes, Myrra stretched forth her hand and, taking the parchment began to read it. But no sooner had her eyes rested upon it than she laid ...
— In Search of El Dorado • Harry Collingwood

... Devon; "and very fain," we are told, "the privy-councillors employed in this work would have got out of him something against them. For when at Throgmorton's trial, his writing containing his confession was read in open court, he prayed the queen's serjeant that was reading it to read further, 'that hereafter,' said he, 'whatsoever become of me, my words may not be perverted and abused to the hurt of some others, and especially against the great personages of whom I have been sundry times, ...
— Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth • Lucy Aikin

... friends, that upon receiving my letter the King called Chamillart to him, and said with emotion: "Well! Monsieur, here is another man who quits us!—" and he read my letter word for word. I did not learn ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... her finger in her neckfillet) Honest? Till the next time. (She sneers) Suppose you got up the wrong side of the bed or came too quick with your best girl. O, I can read your thoughts! ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... again. "Just be patient until I've read this." Her voice and eyes were expressionless, but her ...
— The Man Who Hated Mars • Gordon Randall Garrett

... on Grainger's shoulder, and whispered, "You must come with me, old man. There is glorious news from Chinkie's. I'll tell you all about it in a minute, as soon as we are outside. Make your apologies and let us go," and then going over to Mrs. Trappeme, he handed her the proof to read to her guests and hurried out with Grainger, leaving every one in the room eager to ...
— Chinkie's Flat and Other Stories - 1904 • Louis Becke

... child," she said, "are the prescriptions of a great physician of souls. When the things of ordinary life have not given us the happiness we expected of them, we must seek for happiness in a higher life. Here is the key of a new world. Read night and morning a chapter of this book; but bring your full attention to bear upon what you read; study the words as you would a foreign language. At the end of a month you will be another man. It is now twenty years that I have read a chapter ...
— The Brotherhood of Consolation • Honore de Balzac

... Christ), in the Christian Church, the festival of the nativity of Jesus Christ. The history of this feast coheres so closely with that of Epiphany (q.v.), that what follows must be read in connexion with the article under ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 3 - "Chitral" to "Cincinnati" • Various

... "Forgive me, your majesty, but your question reminds me of a merry fairy tale I have just read of a cannibal who is in the act of devouring a young girl. The poor child pleaded piteously for her life, naturally in vain. 'I cannot, of course, give you your life,' said the cannibal, 'but I will gladly grant you any other wish of your heart. Think, then, quickly, of what ...
— Frederick The Great and His Family • L. Muhlbach

... straightening his back; for he, like some of the others, had a way of resting a while from his labour on such hot days for reasons preternaturally small; of which Cain Ball's advent on a week-day in his Sunday-clothes was one of the first magnitude. "Twas a bad leg allowed me to read the Pilgrim's Progress, and Mark Clark learnt ...
— Far from the Madding Crowd • Thomas Hardy

... sense which borders on stupidity Let them respect my convictions, and I will respect theirs Love that is sacred—not marriage! Mediocrities and the fools always form the immense majority Night-robe of streams and meadows Only being allowed to read religious works or cook-books Poetry did not seem to be the strong point Purgatory and paradise according to the yearly income She went through life in a mood of perpetual discontent So stupid and they pretend they know everything Spend his time quietly regretting the past The tomb is the ...
— Widger's Quotations from The Short Stories of Guy de Maupassant • David Widger

... with brow serene," as Hugo calls him, had lived to read Dedain. A Lord Byron, en 1811, he would have passed a somewhat different criticism ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... sitting with her on his knees by the fire). Come then, my little Lily, I will tell you A story I have read this ...
— The Poetical Works of George MacDonald in Two Volumes, Volume I • George MacDonald

... maritime uses. About midway of its length stood a huge, crazy shed, long ago utilized as a freight storeroom. This had been patched and propped, and a dangerous-looking veranda attached to it, over-hanging the water. Above the doorway was placed a sign whereon might be read the words, "Beaver Beach, Mike's Place." The shore end of the pier was so ruinous that passage was offered by a single row of planks, which presented an appearance so temporary, as well as insecure, that one might have guessed their ...
— The Conquest of Canaan • Booth Tarkington

... supposed that they were a sort of Antinomians, who turned the grace of God into lasciviousness; and there is a tradition, not well sustained, that their heresy was derived from Nicolas, a proselyte of Antioch, one of the seven deacons of whom we read, Acts vi. 5. The similarity of name seems to have suggested this fancy; for there is no historical evidence that one who was "of honest report, full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom," was permitted thus to fall ...
— Notes On The Apocalypse • David Steele

... perhaps give the words in which Caccia describes the work. In the 1586 edition, we read, in the preliminary prose part, ...
— Ex Voto • Samuel Butler

... and a dead silence reigned in the assembly. Boabdil looked anxiously round and scanned every face, but he read in all the anxiety of careworn men, in whose hearts enthusiasm was dead and who had grown callous to every chivalrous appeal. "Allah Akbar!" exclaimed he; "there is no God but God, and Mahomet is his prophet! ...
— Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada • Washington Irving

... information from one John Everard of certain matters which the informer pretended to have overheard at Windsor greatly affecting the city. He had examined Everard on oath, and the result of the examination being then openly read, it was resolved to lay the same before parliament.(851) Accordingly, on the 27th, Everard's information, which was nothing more nor less than a threat which he had overheard some officers make of disarming and plundering the city, was laid before both ...
— London and the Kingdom - Volume II • Reginald R. Sharpe

... above mentioned, Mr. Evarts accompanied a prominent member of the British Parliament to Mount Vernon. Standing in front of the old mansion, so dear to all American hearts, the distinguished visitor, looking across to the opposite shore, remarked: "I read in a history that when Washington was a boy he threw a dollar across the Potomac; remarkable indeed that he could have thrown a dollar so far, a mile away across the Potomac; very remarkable indeed, I declare." "Yes," replied Evarts, "but you must remember that a dollar would go a great deal ...
— Something of Men I Have Known - With Some Papers of a General Nature, Political, Historical, and Retrospective • Adlai E. Stevenson

... Hadrian, Antoninus &c., read with astonishment the apologies of Justin Martyr, of Aristides, of Melito, &c. (See St. Hieron. ad mag. orat. Orosius, lviii. c. 13.) Eusebius says expressly, that the cause of Christianity was defended ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 1 • Edward Gibbon

... offender was not discovered, although it was apparent to the farmer that the heifer had been attacked by some wild beast. The rains, however, had so obliterated the signs that it is doubtful if he could have read them rightly, even had he discovered the scene of ...
— Black Bruin - The Biography of a Bear • Clarence Hawkes

... published in the Proceedings of the Thirty-sixth Annual Meeting, 1889. I am under obligations to Mr. Reuben G. Thwaites, Secretary of this society, for his generous assistance in procuring material for my work, and to Professor Charles H. Haskins, my colleague, who kindly read both manuscript and proof and made helpful suggestions. The reader will notice that throughout the paper I have used the word Northwest in a limited sense as referring to the region included between the Great Lakes and the Ohio and ...
— The Character and Influence of the Indian Trade in Wisconsin • Frederick Jackson Turner

... When you read this letter, the sea, for some distance, will extend between us. We shall live and move elsewhere, but our hearts still with you. We wish that Ernest and Frank would erect a flagstaff on the spot where we last parted with our parents. It may be to us ...
— Willis the Pilot • Paul Adrien

... province has its separate history in print, and reliable maps of each section of the country are extant. The civil code of laws is annually corrected and published, a certain degree of education is universal, and eight-tenths of the people can read and write. The estimate in which letters are held is shown by the fact that learning forms the very threshold that leads to fame, honor, and official position. The means of internal communication between one part of China and another are scarcely ...
— Foot-prints of Travel - or, Journeyings in Many Lands • Maturin M. Ballou

... recall her outlook on life four years ago. She had enjoyed herself up to a point, but all the time she had been groping towards something she did not possess. She had read carefully and with discrimination, and the reading had only filled her with an added sense of her own futility. She felt that she wanted to do something—but what was there for ...
— Mufti • H. C. (Herman Cyril) McNeile

... case. I have heard of a joke of Lord Macaulay, that the House of Commons must be the Beast of the Revelations, since 658 members, with the officers necessary for the action of the House, make 666. Macaulay read most things, and the greater part of the rest: so that he might be suspected of having appropriated as a joke one of Finleyson's serious points—"I wrote Earl Grey[686] upon the 13th of July, 1831, informing him that his Reform {316} Bill could ...
— A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume I (of II) • Augustus De Morgan

... appointed at the meeting. Their names, thus abbreviated, are given, and not a syllable added. But the manner, the then state of things, and their relation to the controversy, give a deep import and intense bitterness to this entry. He knew the men, and in their names read the handwriting ...
— Salem Witchcraft, Volumes I and II • Charles Upham

... to the ranks of the Sinn Feiners has been narrowly averted. When Members read the menu which, according to Major NEWMAN, the Irish Government has adopted for political prisoners—three good square meals a day, including an egg, ten ounces of meat, a pound and a half of bread, two pints and a half of milk, and real butter—they were strongly minded to enlist under ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Nov. 28, 1917 • Various

... your sire's were a difficult part; You're a byway to suicide, Adela Chart; But to read of, depicted by exquisite James, O, sure you're the flower ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Free Institutions,"(10) a mere rhetorical "stunt" in his worst vein now deservedly forgotten, so delighted the young men that they asked to have it printed—quite as the same sort of young men to-day print essays on cubism, or examples of free verse read to poetry societies. Just what views he expressed on things in general among the young men and others; how far he aired his acquaintance with the skeptics, is imperfectly known.(11) However, a rumor ...
— Lincoln • Nathaniel Wright Stephenson

... to the student of Italian art to be able to read French, German, and Italian, for though translations appear of the most important works, there are many interesting articles and monographs of minor ...
— The Venetian School of Painting • Evelyn March Phillipps

... them that it is otherwise by conducting it in the best way possible," added Nat. "For one, I want it for my own improvement. I had better stay at home and read than to go there and spend an evening to no advantage. Fellows who are not able to go to school, but must work from morning till night for a livelihood, are obliged to improve their odd moments if they would ever know any thing. You remember ...
— The Bobbin Boy - or, How Nat Got His learning • William M. Thayer

... they can have no idea of, until they prove it by experience!);—an entreaty, I say, that they would now be assiduous, and earnest, and regular, and punctual, and devout, in their daily study of one chapter of the Bible.—And while you read the Bible, read it believing that you are reading an inspired Book:—not a Book inspired in parts only, but a Book inspired in every part:—not a Book unequally inspired, but all inspired equally:—not a ...
— Inspiration and Interpretation - Seven Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford • John Burgon

... anger him. Maybe we can pull the feathers off these. I have read of plucking a pigeon in our books. (They begin ...
— Three Wonder Plays • Lady I. A. Gregory

... in part in the N.Y. Evening Post, having been furnished by the writer, without his name to it. It is certainly none the less interesting now, as it may be read in ...
— The Underground Railroad • William Still

... desideratum, if not a necessity. The isolated home, made into a flower-vase by the application of the principles set forth in the Gifts[A] above mentioned, may do for babies. But every mother and nurse knows how hard it is to meet the demands of a child too young to be taught to read, but whose opening intelligence and irrepressible bodily activity are so hard to be met by an adult, however genial and active. Children generally take the temper of their whole lives from this period of their existence. Then "the twig is bent," ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 61, November, 1862 • Various



Words linked to "Read" :   see, foretell, anagrammatize, prepare, scry, skim over, show, promise, anticipate, dip into, talk, audition, dictate, call, predict, skim, exercise, speak, prognosticate, trace, forebode, have, practise, anagrammatise, numerate, drill, performing arts, strike, audit, utter, indicate, verbalise, practice, train, feature, mouth, try out, verbalize, publication, misinterpret, anagram, construe, decipher



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