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Na   /nɑ/   Listen
Na

noun
1.
A silvery soft waxy metallic element of the alkali metal group; occurs abundantly in natural compounds (especially in salt water); burns with a yellow flame and reacts violently in water; occurs in sea water and in the mineral halite (rock salt).  Synonyms: atomic number 11, sodium.



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"Na" Quotes from Famous Books



... overflowed high upon Clooth-na-Bare, For the wet winds are blowing out of the clinging air; Like heavy flooded waters our bodies and our blood, But purer than a tall candle before the Holy Rood Is Cathleen the ...
— Stories of Red Hanrahan • W. B. Yeats

... your spare breath for coolin' your broth; And when just Law has a fair clar course, All talk of "wild justice" is frenzy and froth. Uncle SAM is free, but he sez, sez he:— "If he gits within hail Of the Glan-na-Gael, Or the Mafia ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100, April 11, 1891 • Various

... really possible; since 'according to some' it is 'clear' that what the text means to express is the embodied soul as the starting-point of the pranas. The some are the Madhyandinas, who in their text of the Brihad-aranyaka read 'na tasmat prana utkramanti'—'the pranas do not pass forth from him' (the 'tasya' thus being the reading of the Kanva Sakha only).—But, an objection is raised, there is no motive for explicitly negativing the passing away of the pranas ...
— The Vedanta-Sutras with the Commentary by Ramanuja - Sacred Books of the East, Volume 48 • Trans. George Thibaut

... had no laucht at yon foolish lads and begun to rin at the first you'd a bin sinkin' doon to the bowels o' the airth be the noo! Wully Beagrie thocht you was a ghaist, and Tom MacPhail swore ye was only like a goblin on a puddick-steel! "Na!" said I. "Yon's but the daft Englishman—the loony that had escapit frae the waxwarks." I was thinkin' that bein' strange and silly—if not a whole-made feel—ye'd no ken the ways o' the quicksan'! I shouted ...
— Dracula's Guest • Bram Stoker

... be, and the result is a confused jumble of odds and ends, consequent on some persons considering that the end and aim of a museum should be the preservation of "bullets" collected by "Handy-Andy" from the field of "Arrah-na-Pogue," "My Grandfather's Clock," and ...
— Practical Taxidermy • Montagu Browne

... Danay of Kabisilan. When Aponitolau stamped his feet as he was dancing all the fruit of the coconut trees fell down. After they finished Balogagayan and Gimbagonan danced. After they danced Kabin-na-ogan of Kabitaulan danced with Aponigawani. After they danced they went to eat. The food was of thirty different kinds, and they were abashed in the golden house of Ilwisan, which had many valuable jars in it, for the alan ...
— Traditions of the Tinguian: A Study in Philippine Folk-Lore • Fay-Cooper Cole

... number of his followers began to increase. People came from distant parts of Arabia and from neighboring countries to hear him. One day six of the chief men of Me-di'na, one of the largest cities of Arabia, listened earnestly to his preaching and were converted. When they returned home they talked of the new religion to their fellow-citizens, and a great ...
— Famous Men of the Middle Ages • John H. Haaren

... recognized position as poet-laureate of the Western country folk. His materials are the incidents and aspects of village life, especially of the Indiana villages. These he interprets in a manner as acceptable to the na[:i]ve as to the sophisticated, which is saying a good deal for this type of verse. Some of his best known books are The Rubaiyat of Doc Sifers, Home Folks, A Defective Santa Claus, The Old Swimmin' Hole, An Old Sweetheart of Mine, and Out ...
— The Greatest Highway in the World • Anonymous

... postboy, however, denied that "the stoutest man in Scotland could take a gun frae him and shoot him wi' it, though he was but a feckless little body, fit only for the outside o' a saddle or the fore-end of a post-chaise. Na, nae living man wad venture on ...
— Red Cap Tales - Stolen from the Treasure Chest of the Wizard of the North • Samuel Rutherford Crockett

... Makua iloko o ka lani, e hoa noia kou inoa. E hiki mai kou Aupuni; e malamaia kou makemake ma ka honua nei, e like me ia i malamaia ma ka lani la. E haawi mai ia makou i keia la i ai na makou no neia la; e kala mai hoi ia makou i ka makou lawehala ana, me makou e kala nei i ka poe i lawehala i ka makou. Mai hookuu oe ia makou i ka hoowalewaleia mai; e hoopakele no nae ia makou i ka ino; no ka mea, nou ke Aupuni, a me ka mana, a me ka hoonaniia, a mau ...
— Scenes in the Hawaiian Islands and California • Mary Evarts Anderson

... went down the aisle the minister was reading a hymn about "Sounding the Loud Hosan-na," and the lady went into the pew first, and sat down while her husband was putting his hat on the floor. There was a report like distant thunder. You have heard how those confounded paper bags explode when boys blow them up, and crush ...
— Peck's Sunshine - Being a Collection of Articles Written for Peck's Sun, - Milwaukee, Wis. - 1882 • George W. Peck

... his shoulders, and soothing and consoling and praising him. And yet more—big Kirl, one of the best guides in the canton, whose fame had gone far abroad, by whom it was an honour to be noticed at all, said, and little Kirl heard it with his own ears: "Na, if I had not seen it, I would not have believed it! But yes, I saw it, and I saw also in days to come the little man will make such a guide of mountains as ...
— Brave and True - Short stories for children by G. M. Fenn and Others • George Manville Fenn

... But a wind o' ill worked his warlock will, and flang her out to sea. Then wha sae bright as the Saints that night, and an angel came, say they, And sang in the cell where the Righteous dwell, but he took na a Saint away. There yet might they be, for nane could flee, and nane daur'd break the jail, And still the sobbing o' the sea might mix wi' their warlock wail, But then came in black echty-echt, and bluidy echty-nine, Wi' Cess, and Press, and Presbytery, ...
— Ban and Arriere Ban • Andrew Lang

... bhuid bhearrtha to collect rents from the Lynotts, another group of Welshmen, but the Lynotts killed him and threw his body into a well, called ever afterwards Tobar na Sgornaighe (the Well of the Glutton), near the townland of Moygawnagh, Barony of Tyrawley. To avenge the murder of their steward, the Barretts assembled an armed force, and, having defeated the Lynotts and captured many of them, they offered their prisoners ...
— The Lake • George Moore

... is the first of four creeks, crossed by the wagon-road, into which the "Pi-pi-yu-na" divides itself after emerging from the Sierra. These streams are commonly ...
— The Prairie Traveler - A Hand-book for Overland Expeditions • Randolph Marcy

... mor-ga'na), a mirage at sea. The spectator on shore sees images of men, houses, and ships, sometimes on the sea; so-called because formerly regarded as the work of a ...
— Elson Grammer School Literature, Book Four. • William H. Elson and Christine Keck

... I forgive you." Few heard him: the majority were applauding the congressman. Sylvanus Cahoon, whispering in the ear of "Uncle Bedny," expressed as his opinion that "that was about as magnaminious a thing as ever I heard said. Yes, sir! mag-na-min-ious—that's what ...
— Cy Whittaker's Place • Joseph C. Lincoln

... rapture still survived the boy, And Lach-na-gair with Ida look'd o'er Troy, Mixed Celtic memories with the Phrygian mount, And Highland linns with ...
— Byron • John Nichol

... satisfaction, realizing the campaign use that could be made of it. After considering the matter carefully, I sent for a devoted friend of mine, a fine, clean-cut Irishman, who stood high in the ranks of the Clan-na-Gael and other Irish societies in our county. After he had read the speech, we discussed the method of using it, for we felt sure that our Irish friends, when they became acquainted with this speech upon ...
— Woodrow Wilson as I Know Him • Joseph P. Tumulty

... had she died o' crook or cauld, As Ewies do when they grow auld, It wad na been, by mony fauld, Sae sair a heart to nane o's a': For a' the claith that we hae worn, Frae her and her's sae aften shorn, The loss o' her we could hae born, Had fair strae-death ta'en her awa'; The loss o' her ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... comprised Homer, Virgil, Livy, and other ancients; likewise two Latin lexicons, which looked extravagant until you observed how each did but supplement the other's deficiencies, and this so imperfectly that their owner was still liable to search in vain for words between MO and NA. ...
— Strangers at Lisconnel • Barlow Jane

... father!" rejoined the mother, with a small scornful laugh. "Na, but he's something to mak mention o'! Sic a father, lassie, as it wad be tellin' him he had nane! What said ye ...
— Sir Gibbie • George MacDonald

... therefore admit of being dispelled by the comparatively weak conception of non-duality. Hence we conclude that the knowledge which the Vednta-texts aim at inculcating is a knowledge other than the mere knowledge of the sense of sentences, and denoted by 'dhyna,' 'upsan' (i. e. meditation), and ...
— The Vedanta-Sutras with the Commentary by Ramanuja - Sacred Books of the East, Volume 48 • Trans. George Thibaut

... spent their time in cutting down the trees. They sawed the trees into timbers and boards. Some of it they split into staves to make barrels. They sent the staves and other sorts of timber to other countries to be sold. In South Car-o-li-na men made tar and pitch out ...
— Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans • Edward Eggleston

... eyes; there was a faint smile on his lips, he heard as little as he saw; it was evident that he was away where "beyond these voices there is peace," in the fairy country that his forefathers called the Tir na'n Oge. ...
— All on the Irish Shore - Irish Sketches • E. Somerville and Martin Ross

... ma kun whi ni weh, da win gu ba hin ah. Ah hlun hla hlue i hi ei-ah whi no ei-ah whi no i-ah ei-ah hi-ah hin ni ni ah. Tur wey u tur p'hoa whe na he de a na lhen h'li he pun hi ni ni ah Li u yu sa na a a a ya he wa a hi ni ni a hi ni ni a ni ...
— Indian Story and Song - from North America • Alice C. Fletcher

... looked sharply into her son's face, then laying her knitting down in her lap she turned to him and said severely, "And what took them out yonder? And did they not know what-na country it ...
— The Prospector - A Tale of the Crow's Nest Pass • Ralph Connor

... you go on at such a pace, there is no answering you. There is no forgiveness in the case. Further acquaintance had already convinced me that she was lovely and perfect, but that 'she is na mine ain lassie.' Yes, she caught my imagination; and you and my father would have it that I was in love, and I supposed you knew best: but when I was let alone to a rational consideration, I found that to me she is rather the embodied Isabel of romance, a beauteous vision, than the—the—in ...
— Dynevor Terrace (Vol. I) - or, The Clue of Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... a, that which stands, or those which stand; in other words, "many built standing together." This cannot be regarded as referring to the simple fact that a village is necessarily composed of many houses standing together. The name for any other village than a communal pueblo is ti na kwin ne, from ti na—many sitting around, and kwin ne, place of. This term is applied by the Zunis to all villages save their own and those of ourselves, which latter they regard as Pueblos, in their acceptation of ...
— A Study of Pueblo Pottery as Illustrative of Zuni Culture Growth. • Frank Hamilton Cushing

... den thashin, come, boys! let us drink; 'Tis madness to sorra, 'tis folly to think. For we're ahl jolly fellows wheriver we go— Ogedashin, den thashin, na ...
— The Magnetic North • Elizabeth Robins (C. E. Raimond)

... but invaluable expression. Possibly it is derived from "Il n'y a plus." It means, "All over!" You say "Na pooh!" when you push your plate away after dinner. It also means, "Not likely!" or "Nothing doing!" By a further development it has come to mean "done for," "finished," and in extreme cases, "dead." "Poor ...
— The First Hundred Thousand • Ian Hay

... I know? The last time I remimber him he was askin' a girl in the Turkish theayter whether she liked vanilla or rawsburry in her soda wather, the droolin jackanapes. Ah, na-ha, the girls of Limerick city——." The colonel resumed ...
— The Adventures of Uncle Jeremiah and Family at the Great Fair - Their Observations and Triumphs • Charles McCellan Stevens (AKA 'Quondam')

... and crammed the Sifflication into his hand, and he opened it like in amaze; and just as he saw the first line, I was minded to make a reverence, and I had the ill luck to hit his jaud o' a beast on the nose with my hat, and scaur the creature, and she swarved aside, and the king, that sits na mickle better than a draff-pock on the saddle, was like to have gotten a clean coup, and that might have cost my craig a raxing-and he flung down the paper amang the beast's feet, and cried, 'Away wi' the fause loon that brought it!' And they grippit me, and cried treason; and I thought of the ...
— The Fortunes of Nigel • Sir Walter Scott

... course, is a paraphrase of the original, which, perhaps, may be given as an explanation. "Ilega, 'Livia'. Al 'na', y ...
— The Wonder-Working Magician • Pedro Calderon de la Barca

... literary productions. "It is well known," he says, "that the great French scholar produced two or three bulky volumes upon the Avesta." Iknow of one bulky volume only, "Commentaire sur la Yana," tome i., Paris, 1833, but that may be due ...
— Chips from a German Workshop - Volume IV - Essays chiefly on the Science of Language • Max Muller

... continued, leering significantly at Gillian, "hath more attraction for you than our court dames? Troth! the quean is not ill-favoured; but ye ha' lost a gude day's sport, Count, forbye ither losses which we sall na particularize. We hae had a noble flight at the heron, and anither just as guid after the bustard. God's santy! the run the lang-leggit loon gave us. Lady Exeter, on her braw Spanish barb—we ken whose gift it is—was the only one able to keep with us; and it was her leddyship's ain peregrine ...
— The Star-Chamber, Volume 1 - An Historical Romance • W. Harrison Ainsworth

... "and if I did! I wasn't upstairs more nor five minutes, and th' new servant had na' come! There was but you ...
— Helen with the High Hand (2nd ed.) • Arnold Bennett

... I'd say, if I were to choose for myself. We've plenty of old tunes, Mr. Walpole,' said Kearney, turning to that gentleman, 'that rebellion, as you call it, has never got hold of. There's "Cushla Macree" and the "Cailan deas cruidhte na Mbo."' ...
— Lord Kilgobbin • Charles Lever

... Appendix C) to John Brunner's 1975 novel "The Shockwave Rider"). Gibson's near-total ignorance of computers and the present-day hacker culture enabled him to speculate about the role of computers and hackers in the future in ways hackers have since found both irritatingly na"ive and tremendously stimulating. Gibson's work was widely imitated, in particular by the short-lived but innovative "Max Headroom" TV series. See {cyberspace}, ...
— The Jargon File, Version 4.0.0

... water-drinker—and its weel seen on him.—There was a sair want of speerit through the haill o' yon lang "Excursion." If he had just made the paragraphs about ae half shorter, and at the end of every ane taen a caulker, like ony ither man engaged in geyan sair and heavy wark, think na ye that his "Excursion" would hae ...
— Famous Reviews • Editor: R. Brimley Johnson

... the afternoon, the Chippeways came to my house, about sixty in number, and headed by Mina-va-va-na, their chief. They walked in single file, each with his tomahawk in one hand, and scalping knife in the other. Their bodies were naked, from the waist upwards, except in a few examples, where blankets were thrown loosely over the shoulders. Their faces were painted with ...
— Summer on the Lakes, in 1843 • S.M. Fuller

... L. ex-) is privative, as in orsorg, orwna; or denotes origin, antiquity, as ...
— A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary - For the Use of Students • John R. Clark Hall

... host is riding from Knocknarea, And over the grave of Clooth-na-bare; Caolte tossing his burning hair, And Niamh calling, "Away, come away; Empty your heart of its mortal dream. The winds awaken, the leaves whirl round, Our cheeks are pale, our hair is unbound, Our breasts are heaving, our eyes are a-gleam, Our arms are waving, our lips are apart, And if ...
— The Celtic Twilight • W. B. Yeats

... prevaricate," Sandy began, his eyes gloating on her lovely confusion; "do na preteend—" But the sweet blue eyes were too much for him. Breaking down utterly, he tossed the guineas to one side on the table, and stretching out both hands toward Bel, he exclaimed,—"Ye're the sweetest thing the eyes o' a mon ever rested on, lass, an' I'm goin' to win ...
— Between Whiles • Helen Hunt Jackson

... 'Alanoi,'Alaunoi; Chinese 'O-lan-na; since the 9th century A.D. they have been called As, Russ. Jasy, Georgian Ossi), the easternmost division of the Sarmatians (see SCYTHIA), Iranian nomads with some Altaic admixture. First met with north of the Caspian, and later (c. 1st century A.D.) spreading into the steppes ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... think it must have been cast there by some shipwreck in the olden time. D'ye mind, Hal, of the story of the wreck of yon Spanish ship on the Carrig-na-Spana?" ...
— The Pilots of Pomona • Robert Leighton

... two-ridged spear, which almost took our hair from our heads and passed through us to the ground. I questioned Benen as to this wind. Said Benen to me, 'This is the wind of hell which has opened before Cuchulainn.'" Lebar na huidre, p. 113 a. This "wind of hell" makes one think of the sweet-scented wind from the mid-day regions, and the evil-scented wind from the north, which in old Persian religious belief blew to meet pure and wicked souls after death (Tylor's ...
— Indian Fairy Tales • Anonymous

... second century A.D., a prince of Khotan,[238] Kiu-sa-tan-na, was desirous of obtaining from China the eggs of the silkworm, but his request was refused; and it was prohibited that either eggs of the silkworm or seed of mulberry-trees should cross ...
— Needlework As Art • Marian Alford

... pages and glance over the naïve records, each one beginning, "Last night I dreamed," the past comes very vividly back to me. I see that bowery orchard, shining in memory with a soft glow of beauty—"the light that never was on land or sea,"—where we ...
— The Story Girl • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... externally by constrictions, has a directive influence on the circulation of its contents. The student should sketch Figure 1 once or twice, and make himself familiar with the order and names of the parts before proceeding. We have, in succession, the mouth (M.), separated from the nasal passage (Na.) above the palate; the pharynx (ph.), where the right and left nasal passages open by the posterior nares into the mouth; the oesophagus (oes.); the bag-like stomach, its left (Section 6) end being called the cardiac ...
— Text Book of Biology, Part 1: Vertebrata • H. G. Wells

... "Massa Gov'na, we's mighty po' this winter, and Ah wish you would pardon mah old man. He is a fiddler same as you is, and he's in ...
— Toaster's Handbook - Jokes, Stories, and Quotations • Peggy Edmund & Harold W. Williams, compilers

... "I d'na care for her hair, either," continued Jamie, who was very nice in his tastes; "something mair ...
— Stories by English Authors: Scotland • Various

... Sae grand doings I hae na seen sin the day o' the queen's visit to Lone. That wad be in the auld duke's time. And a ...
— The Lost Lady of Lone • E.D.E.N. Southworth

... the mone stond ant strit, On is bot-forke is burthen he bereth Hit is muche wonder that he na down slyt, For doute leste he valle ...
— Moon Lore • Timothy Harley

... Brothers! the sun is sinking in the west, and Wa-na-bucky-she will soon cease speakin. Brothers! the poor red man belongs to a race which is ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume III. (of X.) • Various

... 15th dawned as usual; the sun rose with uncommon splendor, and Lake Michigan "was a sheet of burnished gold." Early in the day a message was received in the American camp from To-pee-na-bee, a chief of the St. Joseph's band, informing them that mischief was brewing among the Pottawatomies, who ...
— Heroes and Hunters of the West • Anonymous

... "Na, na, Sandy; your wey o't 'ill no' do ava," said the Smith. "There'll be bairns an' auld fowk in heaven as weel's here. Auld fowk 'ill no' get dune or dotal, like what they do i' this world, undootedly; but there'll be young fowk for them to guide an' advise. It wud be a puir wey o' doin', I'm thinkin', ...
— My Man Sandy • J. B. Salmond

... bread, Kens na whaur to lay her head, Atween the Kirkgate and the Cross There stands a bonnie white horse, It can gallop, it can trot, ...
— Children's Rhymes, Children's Games, Children's Songs, Children's Stories - A Book for Bairns and Big Folk • Robert Ford

... Whinney Moor that thou mayest pass, Every night and awle, To Brig of dread thou com'st at last, And Christ receive thy sawle. From Brig of dread, na brader than a thread, Every night and awle, To Purgatory fire thou com'st at last, And Christ receive ...
— Highways and Byways in Surrey • Eric Parker

... continue to multiply; but they have changed character. The inexorable truth of the photograph, and the sketches of the war correspondent, now bring all the vividness and violence of fact to help the artist's imagination. There was something na[:i]ve and theatrical in the drawings of anticipation; but the pictures of the hour represent the most tragic reality,—always becoming more terrible. At this writing, Japan has yet lost no single battle; but not a few of her victories have been ...
— The Romance of the Milky Way - And Other Studies & Stories • Lafcadio Hearn

... "My lass, I hae na commission to remove you. I dinna ken what ye hae done to bring yoursel' here; but here ye maun bide till the morn," ...
— Self-Raised • Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth

... um rico piano forte do autor Erard, de 3 cordas, por 280$, garantido; na rua da Quitanda ...
— A Voyage in the 'Sunbeam' • Annie Allnut Brassey

... My daddie's na doylt, tho' he's auld, The winnock is pawkie an' gleg; When the lammies are pit i' the fauld, They're fear'd that I'm aff to my Meg. My mither sits spinnin'—ae blink O' a smile in her kind, bonnie 'ee; She's minded o' mony a link She, stowlins, ...
— Old Spookses' Pass • Isabella Valancy Crawford

... place, and famous not less for his dog than for his music, his news and his songs. The Earl of Northumberland, of his day, offered the piper a small farm for his dog, but after deliberating for a day Allan said, "Na, na, ma Lord, keep yir ferum; what wud a piper do wi' a ferum?" From this dog descended Davidson of Hyndlee's breed, the original Dandie-Dinmont, and Crab could count his kin up to him. He had a great look of the Right Honorable Edward Ellice, and had much of his energy and ...
— Spare Hours • John Brown

... Guid traith, my lady, the company were my diversion,—and better na human follies ever afforded; ha, ha, ha! sic an a mixture—and sic oddities, ha, ha, ha!—a perfect Gallimaufry.—Lady Kunegunda M'Kenzie and I used to gang about till every part of this human chaos, on purpose to reconnoitre the monsters and pick ...
— The Man Of The World (1792) • Charles Macklin

... some demon-worshipping Malayan. Now, the Ilongot appear to have religious ideas that have come from various sources. Those of Nueva Vizcaya, with whom I talked, professed belief in spirits and called them "be tung"; the spirits of the dead were "gi na va." The Ilongot of Patakgao, curiously, have been affected by Christian nomenclature. The ruling spirit or spirits is "apo sen diot" ("apo" meaning lord or sir and "diot" being a corruption of Dios). They had no word ...
— The Negrito and Allied Types in the Philippines and The Ilongot or Ibilao of Luzon • David P. Barrows

... the tent of the nomad Bedouin, in the homes of cultured Europeans and Americans. Dr. Buschmann studied these "nature-sounds," as he called them, and found that they are chiefly variations and combinations of the syllables ab, ap, am, an, ad, at, ba, pa, ma, na, da, ta, etc., and that in one language, not absolutely unrelated to another, the same sound will be used to denote the "mother" that in the second signifies "father," thus evidencing the applicability of these words, in the earliest stages of their ...
— The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought • Alexander F. Chamberlain

... efforts. Then she thought of another argument. She produced her purse, and showed the girl some sovereigns, then led her to the door, intimating by signs that she would give her the money if she would but open it. The girl seemed to understand, but laughed again and shook her head. "Na, na," she said. "I daurna lat ye oot sae lang's the maister's here." ...
— Under False Pretences - A Novel • Adeline Sergeant

... Political parties and leaders: NA; note - political parties in Afghanistan are in flux and many prominent players have plans to create new parties; the Transitional Islamic State of Afghanistan (TISA) is headed by President Hamid KARZAI; the TISA is a coalition ...
— The 2003 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... Pasig has a few," observed the captain, who did not relish any depreciation of the river where he navigated and earned his livelihood. "Here you have that of Malapad-na-bato, a rock sacred before the coming of the Spaniards as the abode of spirits. Afterwards, when the superstition had been dissipated and the rock profaned, it was converted into a nest of tulisanes, ...
— The Reign of Greed - Complete English Version of 'El Filibusterismo' • Jose Rizal

... NA'TURE, s. constitution of an animated body; regular course of things; disposition of mind; native state or properties of ...
— The Illustrated London Reading Book • Various

... red-coats, and I jalouse he wad hae liked to hae ridden by, but his horse (it's a gude gelding) was ower sair travailed; he behoved to stop whether he wad or no. Serve him cannily, Jenny, and wi' little din, and dinna bring the sodgers on him by speering ony questions at him; but let na him hae a room to himsell, they wad say we were hiding him.—For yoursell, Jenny, ye'll be civil to a' the folk, and take nae heed o' ony nonsense and daffing the young lads may say t'ye. Folk in the hostler line maun put up wi' muckle. ...
— Old Mortality, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... [FN15] "Na'iman" is said to one after bathing or head-shaving: the proper reply, for in the East every sign of ceremony has its countersign, is "Allah benefit thee!" (Pilgrimage i. 11, iii. 285; Lane M. E. chaps. viii.; ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... body o' man!" said he, "they talk as if they owned the world, and a man could na live upon it save by their leave. I must build my fire in a pipe, or pay ten shillings fine? Things ha' come to a pretty pass—a pretty pass, indeed!" He kicked the rushes that were strewn upon the floor, and ground the clay with his heel. "This litter will ha' to be all took out. ...
— Master Skylark • John Bennett

... on this side o' Manchester; and the very day at after we came, I went to her old missus, and asked to speak a word wi' her. I had a strong mind to cast it up to her, that she should ha' sent my poor lass away, without telling on it to us first; but she were in black, and looked so sad I could na' find in my heart to threep it up. But I did ask her a bit about our Lizzie. The master would have turned her away at a day's warning (he's gone to t'other place; I hope he'll meet wi' more mercy there than he showed our Lizzie—I do), and when the missus ...
— Lizzie Leigh • Elizabeth Gaskell

... monotonous nasal drone of the plain chant was faintly heard in the distance. So soon as this was over, the lay clerk sat himself down by the hanging drum, and, to its accompaniment, began intoning the prayer, "Na Mu Miyo Ho Ren Go Kiyo," the congregation fervently joining in unison with him. These words, repeated over and over again, are the distinctive prayer of the Buddhist sect of Nichiren, to which the temple Cho-o-ji is dedicated. They are approximations to Sanscrit sounds, and have ...
— Tales of Old Japan • Algernon Bertram Freeman-Mitford

... Arrah-na-Pogue was writ by Dion O'Bourcicolt & Edward McHouse. They writ it well. O'Bourcy has writ a cartload of plays himself, the ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 7 • Charles Farrar Browne

... Jock's door they stude an hour, An' vainly kicked an' knockit, Sin' Jock, in a' the fear o' death, Had got it barred an' lockit. An' 'twas na till the neist forenune They fand the leg, weel hidden, For Jock was oot afore daylicht An' stuck it in ...
— The Auld Doctor and other Poems and Songs in Scots • David Rorie

... three hundred miles from the nearest telegraph-pole, and shall enter Afghanistan at a point so much nearer to Quetta than to the Boundary Commission Camp that the chances seem all in favor of reaching the former place if I only succeed in reaching the Dasht-i-na-oomid and ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle Volume II. - From Teheran To Yokohama • Thomas Stevens

... looked like the worst nightmare of a drug-dreamer, ablaze with the colors of the smoking incense, the swaying crowd, and their monotonous cries. Quite suddenly there was a blaze of purple light and someone screamed in raving ecstasy: "Na ki na Nebran ...
— The Door Through Space • Marion Zimmer Bradley

... possessed, honestly or dishonestly, either of this volume or of the matter which it contains. There is, by the way, a volume of Wordsworth's prose in the Scott Library (1s.). Those who have not read Wordsworth on poetry can have no idea of the nave charm and the helpful radiance of his expounding. I feel that I cannot too strongly press Wordsworth's criticism ...
— LITERARY TASTE • ARNOLD BENNETT

... was so called, when there was no such bird ever in the world. "Sure that's the reason," said the driver. "Sure there's no such Park in the world either." Lord Chesterfield put up a column with a Phoenix in the Park, but of old its name was Parc-na-Fionniake (the field of the clear water). It lies on the northern bank of the river celebrated by ...
— The Sunny Side of Ireland - How to see it by the Great Southern and Western Railway • John O'Mahony and R. Lloyd Praeger

... Gotama. Others however are definitely Brahmanic and in Bangkok are superintended by the Brahmans attached to the Court. Since the time of Mongkut Buddhist priests are also present as a sign that the rites, if not ordered by Buddhism, at least have its countenance. Such is the Rek Na,[227] or ploughing festival. The king is represented by the Minister of Agriculture who formerly had the right to exact from all shops found open such taxes as he might claim for his temporary sovereignty. At present he is escorted in procession to Dusit,[228] a royal ...
— Hinduism and Buddhism, An Historical Sketch, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Charles Eliot

... of Slieve-na-griddle is another circle of the same enormous boulders. A cromlech is piled in the midst of it, and an avenue of stones leads up to the circle. Its form is that of many circles with enclosed cromlechs at Carrowmore, though in these the avenue is ...
— Ireland, Historic and Picturesque • Charles Johnston

... uncircumspecte young men, to hery, burne, and slay, and tak prisoneris, in her realme, and use all misordour and crueltie, not only usit in weir, but detestabil to all barbar and wild Tartaris, in slaying of prisoneris, and contrair to all humanitie and justice, keeping na promeis to miserabil catives resavit anis to thair mercy "—Admonitioun to the trew lordis, Striveling, 1571. He numbers, among these insurgents, highlanders as well as borderers, Buccleuch and Fairnihirst, the Johnstons and Armstrongs, ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish border (3rd ed) (1 of 3) • Walter Scott

... "Na, no a drap," answered Donal. "I'll gang i' the stren'th o' that ye hae gi'en me—maybe no jist forty days, gudewife, but mair nor forty minutes, an' that's a gude pairt o' a day. I thank ye hertily. Yon was the milk o' human kin'ness, gien ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... in't; and happen how it might, the poor lass fell in love wi' him. Some said they was married. Some said it hang'd i' the bell-ropes, and never had the priest's blessing; but anyhow, married or no, there was talk enough amang the folk, and out o' doors she would na budge. And there was two wee barns; and she prayed him hard to confess the marriage, poor thing! But t'was a bootlese bene, and he would not allow they should bear his name, but their mother's; he was a hard man, and hed the bit in his ...
— J. S. Le Fanu's Ghostly Tales, Volume 3 • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... persons talked of by the Blackfeet. The Sun, the creator of the universe, giver of light, heat, and life, and reverenced by every one, is often called Old Man, but there is another personality who bears the same name, but who is very different in his character. This last Na'pi is a mixture of wisdom and foolishness; he is malicious, selfish, childish, and weak. He delights in tormenting people. Yet the mean things he does are so foolish that he is constantly getting himself into scrapes, ...
— Blackfeet Indian Stories • George Bird Grinnell

... Ro-a-no-ak Grew in strength and wondrous beauty; Like a flower of the wildwood, Bloomed beside the Indian maidens. And Wi-no-na Ska[V] they called her, She of all the maidens fairest. In the tangles of her tresses Sunbeams lingered, pale and yellow; In her eyes the limpid blueness Of the noonday sky was mirrored. And the squaws of darksome features Smiled upon her fair young ...
— The White Doe - The Fate of Virginia Dare • Sallie Southall Cotten

... Adder riseth about Motcomb, neer Shaftesbury. In the Legeir booke of Wilton Abbey it is wrott Nore, "a Nodderi fluvii ripa", (hodie Adder-bourn, Nare}, "serpens, anguis", Saxonic, Addar, in Welsh, signifies a bird.*) This river runnes through the magnificent garden of the Earle of Pembroke at Wilton, and so beyond to Christ Church. It hath in it a rare fish, called an umber, which are sent from Salisbury to London. They are about the bignesse ...
— The Natural History of Wiltshire • John Aubrey

... 'Na then, Liza Kemp,' said his companion, turning round with mock indignation, 'you let my Johnny alone. If you come gettin' round 'im I'll give you ...
— Liza of Lambeth • W. Somerset Maugham

... picture of the fort on its obverse side, surrounded by the words, "Defender of Fort Ridgely, August 18-27, 1862." Just over the flag staff, in a scroll, is the legend, in Sioux, "Ti-yo-pa-na-ta-ka-pi," which means, "It shut the door against us," referring to the battle having obstructed the further advance of the Indians. This was said by one of the Indians in the attacking party in giving his view of the effect of the repulse, and adopted by the committee having charge of ...
— The History of Minnesota and Tales of the Frontier • Charles E. Flandrau

... pot with a cover on. At last he saw a glimmer far down, and in a short time he felt the ground. Out he came from the big lime-kiln, and, lo! and behold you, there was a wood, and green fields, and a castle in a lawn, and a bright sky over all. 'It's in Tir-na-n-Oge I am,' says he. 'Let's see what sort of people are in the castle.' On he walked, across fields and lawn, and no one was there to keep him out or let him into the castle; but the big hall-door was wide open. He ...
— The Lilac Fairy Book • Andrew Lang

... Jorrocks, judging of the Baron by himself, and thereupon the lad was sent for three-penn'orth. When it arrived, the Baron dashed it out of his hand with a prolonged sacre-e-e-e—! adding "I vill von wet-tin-nin-na-ary surgeon." The boy was dispatched for one, and on his arrival the veterinary surgeon went through the process that the Baron had attempted, and not being a man of many words, he just gave the Baron ...
— Jorrocks' Jaunts and Jollities • Robert Smith Surtees

... one other legend with incidents similar to the Old Testament history wherein "Na-ula-a-Mainea, an Oahu prophet, left Oahu for Kauai, was upset in his canoe, was swallowed by a whale, and thrown up alive on the ...
— Hawaiian Folk Tales - A Collection of Native Legends • Various

... round bones. The processes are of a more dense character. The projections are so arranged that a tube, or canal, is formed immediately behind the bodies of the vertebrae, in which is placed the me-dul'la spi-na'lis, (spinal cord,) sometimes called ...
— A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (Revised Edition) • Calvin Cutter

... in describing a certain type of mind: "Il est d'heureux esprits, des mes fortes et saines, que n'effraie point le silence ternel des espaces infinis o s'anantissait la raison de Pascal. Naves et robustes natures, mles et vigoureux penseurs, qui gardent toute la vie quelque chose des dons charmants de la jeunesse et de l'enfance mme, une foi vive dans le tmoinage immdiat de nos sens et de notre conscience, une humeur alerte, toute de joyeuse ardeur, et comme une intrpidit d'esprit ...
— Baron d'Holbach - A Study of Eighteenth Century Radicalism in France • Max Pearson Cushing

... place in autumn in a large village. The Scene represents Peter's roomy hut. Peter is sitting on a wooden bench, mending a horse-collar. Ansya and Akoulna are spinning, and singing ...
— The Power of Darkness • Leo Tolstoy

... loveliness; * Myself amid thy thralls I willingly confess: O thou, whose eyes and glances captivate mankind, * Pray that I 'scape those arrows shot with all thy stress! Two hostile rivals water and enflaming fire * Thy cheek hath married, which for marvel I profess: Thou art Sa'ir in heart of me and eke Na'im;[FN204] * Thou agro- dolce, eke ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 4 • Richard F. Burton

... occurred to me that in my then condition of nerves nothing was more likely than that I should turn visionary and fancy I beheld apparitions. And under this conviction I got up and covered the glass, in which I felt sure I should presently "see sic sights as I daured na tell." I speak of this because, though I was in a physical condition not unlikely to produce such phenomena, I retained the power of perceiving that they would be the result of my physical condition, and that I should in some measure be accessory to my own terror, whatever ...
— Records of a Girlhood • Frances Anne Kemble

... hae thought the like o' that o' him?— na, if it had been for debt, or e'en for a bit tuilzie [*Scuffle] wi' the gauger, the deil o' Nelly Mac-Candlish's tongue should ever hae wranged him. But if he really shot young Hazlewood—But I canna think it, Mr. Glossin; this will be same o' your skits [*Tricks] ...
— Guy Mannering • Sir Walter Scott

... the "Cumann na Ban" next turned the top story of the Athenaeum into an improvised hospital, and here were brought the wounded in the attack on the constabulary barracks, which lasted all Thursday and ...
— Six days of the Irish Republic - A Narrative and Critical Account of the Latest Phase of Irish Politics • Louis Redmond-Howard

... into a compact of mutual forbearance with a lobster,—to him a monster of unknown powers and formidable proportions,—which he had at first attempted to capture, but which had shown fight, and had nearly captured him in turn. "Weel, weel, let a-be for let a-be," he is made to say; "if thou does na clutch me in thy grips, I'se no clutch thee in mine." It is to this primitive parish that David Vedder, the sailor-poet of Orkney, refers, in his "Orcadian Sketches," as "celebrated over the whole archipelago for the peculiarities of its inhabitants, their singular manners ...
— The Cruise of the Betsey • Hugh Miller

... foot should be all Scottish war, By hill and moss themselves to ware; Let woods for walls be; bow and spear And battle-axe their fighting gear: That enemies do them na dreir, In strait places gar keep all store, And burn the plain land them before: Then shall they pass away in haste, When that they find nothing but waste; With wiles and wakening of the night. And mickle noise made on height; Then shall they turn with great affray, As they were ...
— Cameos from English History, from Rollo to Edward II • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... be na the kin' o' place to draw crook-fingered gentry,' he said, 'some gangrel body micht creep in and mak his bed intil 't, and that lock 'ill be eneuch to haud him ...
— Heather and Snow • George MacDonald

... themselves and the shore, and waited. And the Danaans raised up a druid mist and a storm against them, whereby Ireland seemed to them no more than the size of a pig's back in the water; and by reason of that it has the name of Innis na Wic, the Island of the Pig. But if the Gods had magic, Amargin had better magic; and he sang that Invocation to the Land of Ireland; and at that the storm fell and the mist vanished. Then Eber Donn was exulting ...
— The Crest-Wave of Evolution • Kenneth Morris

... said Michael; "but on the verge of foolishness. To look down upon merchants and business is no longer nave, but foolish. Without merchants the Holy Father himself would starve in prison. The whole world is a trading concern and there's no harm in that. Our business we rightly call the sacred business because, at all events, it is still the most trustworthy firm ...
— The Bride of Dreams • Frederik van Eeden

... your tongue now, lady fair, Forsooth, and so it sall na be; Were he but the one Graham of the name, He suld be ...
— Lyra Heroica - A Book of Verse for Boys • Various

... O think na but my heart was sair, When my Love dropt down and spak nae mair! I laid her down wi' meikle care, On ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... man, with a certain eloquence, and also subtili- [Sidenote: Rhetorike and Logike giuen of na- ture.] te to reason and discusse, of any que- stion or proposicion propounded, as Aristotle the Philosopher, in his Booke of Rhetorike dooeth shewe. These giftes of nature, singuler doe flowe and abounde in vs, accordyng to the greate and ample indumente and plentuousnes ...
— A booke called the Foundacion of Rhetorike • Richard Rainolde

... 19 the 'Doutelle' cast anchor in Loch na-Nuagh, in the country of the loyal Macdonalds. The first thing Charles did was to send a letter to the young Clanranald to beg his immediate presence. The next day four of the chief men of the clan waited on Charles, Clanranald, Kinloch Moidart, Glenaladale, and another ...
— The Red True Story Book • Various

... and having tarried a few days at Gawgushshawga, we moved on up the creek to a place that was called Yis-kah-wa-na, (meaning in English ...
— A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison • James E. Seaver

... nod. "Don't trust to it, monsieur! Those artists—ca na pas de principes! From one day to another he can plant her there! I know them, allez. I've had them here very often; one year with one, another year ...
— Madame de Mauves • Henry James

... 'Na, it wouldn't be right like; I can't come aht with yer, and then mean nothin'! It would be doin' yer aht ...
— Liza of Lambeth • W. Somerset Maugham

... blushles face, and vnstaied penne, I meane the woordes, of that well learned wighte, in open audience to pronounce, and by this booke, to suche elected sort for to declame: but loth for to offende, as one well bet in mariage schole, I must, a p[oe]na & culpa, forgiuenes craue: lest some shreude heathen dame (for other doubt I not) doe from her graue Al' Arme crie out: and then to fight with buried ghostes: my manhode will not serue, but by and by with posting legges, and flying fast I will retire. But doubtes here ...
— The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1 • William Painter

... high up on wintry Knock-na-rea In an old cairn of stones; while her poor women Must lie and jog in the wave if they would sleep Being water born—yet if she cry their names They run up on the land and dance in the moon Till they are giddy and would love as men do, And be as patient and as pitiful. But there is nothing ...
— The Countess Cathleen • William Butler Yeats

... of voice is called accent. If the word consists of three or more syllables there is usually another syllable stressed in somewhat less degree. This is called a secondary accent. In some cases there may even be a third accent if the word is very long; In'-come, val-e-tu'-di-na'-ri-an. This fact arises from the tendency natural to all human speech to take more or less musical forms. The monotony of a series of stressed or of unstressed sounds would be unbearable. The pronunciation of such a series would be a highly artificial and ...
— Division of Words • Frederick W. Hamilton



Words linked to "Na" :   sodium, Na-Dene, metal, metallic element, saltwater, rock salt, halite, brine, Rostov na Donu, seawater, atomic number 11



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