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N   /ɛn/   Listen
N

noun
1.
A common nonmetallic element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless inert diatomic gas; constitutes 78 percent of the atmosphere by volume; a constituent of all living tissues.  Synonyms: atomic number 7, nitrogen.
2.
The cardinal compass point that is at 0 or 360 degrees.  Synonyms: due north, north, northward.
3.
A unit of force equal to the force that imparts an acceleration of 1 m/sec/sec to a mass of 1 kilogram; equal to 100,000 dynes.  Synonym: newton.
4.
(of a solution) concentration expressed in gram equivalents of solute per liter.  Synonym: normality.
5.
The 14th letter of the Roman alphabet.



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"N" Quotes from Famous Books



... of Captain Allen, U. S. N., was not in uniform, but in civilian attire. In another carriage Able Seaman Runkle, at Dave's order, followed the conveyance that took Dalny back to the appointed meeting place with Mender. The sailorman's carriage did not, of course, ...
— Dave Darrin on Mediterranean Service - or, With Dan Dalzell on European Duty • H. Irving Hancock

... for this dog," he pronounced, "as a piece of dam' foolishness, a sort of drunken joke on Greenstream. But it's no joke; the two hundred was cheap. I've seen a lot of good men—I'm not exactly a peafowl myself—but this young dog's better'n any man I ever stood up to; he's ...
— Mountain Blood - A Novel • Joseph Hergesheimer

... assembled near Whitlock's Mills in Suffolk County, and remained in the neighborhood till the failure of the Richmond plan became known. Petersburg newspapers also had letters containing similar tales. Then the alarm spread more widely. Near Edenton, N.C., there was undoubtedly a real insurrection, though promptly suppressed; and many families ultimately removed from that vicinity in consequence. In Charleston, S.C., there was still greater excitement, if the contemporary ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, Number 59, September, 1862 • Various

... the Princess's amused me the other day. Somebody wanted to give Nelitchka garlic as a medicine. "Quoi? Une petite amour comme ca, qu'on ne pourrait pas baiser? Il n'y a pas de sens ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 23 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... and regarded the French inhabitants literally as part of the scenery, and largely as a humorous part thereof. We got on well enough with them, and knew enough French to buy endless sweets at Rumpelmeyer's or chez Ngres, to get queer knives and "oddities" at the fairs, or to conduct paper-chases along the course of the Canal or in Pine Woods bordering it. We refused, however, to take the French ...
— The Adventure of Living • John St. Loe Strachey

... James Stephens, E. A. Robinson, Vachel Lindsay, Amy Lowell, Edgar Lee Masters, Sara Teasdale, J. C. Underwood, Fannie Stearns Davis; to Henry Holt and Company, who publish the poems of Walter De La Mare, Edward Thomas, Padraic Colum, Robert Frost, Louis Untermeyer, Sarah N. Cleghorn, Margaret Widdemer, Carl Sandburg, and the two poems by Henry A. Beers quoted in this book, which appeared in The Ways of Yale; to Charles Scribner's Sons, publishers of the poems of ...
— The Advance of English Poetry in the Twentieth Century • William Lyon Phelps

... scorning to redeem One doubt from others' half-withheld esteem; In self-inflicted penance of a breast Which tenderness might once have wrung from rest, In vigilance of grief that would compel The soul to hate for having loved too well. There was in him a vital scorn of all, As if the worst had fall'n which could befall. He stood a stranger in this breathing world, An erring spirit from another hurl'd; A thing of dark imaginings, that shaped By choice the perils ...
— The Life of Lord Byron • John Galt

... refugees do not complain; they are not that kind. They told their stories simply and invariably finished with a shrug of the shoulders and the phrase "c'est la guerre n'est ce pas?" (That is war, is it not?) But if the French army ever gets on German soil I would hate ...
— On the Fringe of the Great Fight • George G. Nasmith

... the majority of citizens, disapprove, but I fear there will not be public disavowal. Even N. Wright but faintly opposes, and Dr. Fore has been exceedingly violent. Mr. Hammond (editor of the 'Gazette') in a very dignified and judicious manner has condemned the whole thing, and Henry has opposed, but ...
— The Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe • Charles Edward Stowe

... este ruine par l'antiquite fut commence a reedifier l'a^n de grace 1534 et fut perfaict l'a^n 1550 par revere^nde dame Madame Loyse de Silly abbesse de cea^ns. Gloire et ...
— Sketches of Travel in Normandy and Maine • Edward A. Freeman

... tree is one standing in the yard of J. H. Westbrook, Mt. Olive, N. C., and grew from what, to all appearances, was a pecan nut. The foliage and general aspect of the tree closely resembles the pecan, though the serrations on the leaves are coarser and larger. The fruit ...
— The Pecan and its Culture • H. Harold Hume

... mute and foolish I oft time became When all her grace and virtue I beheld; How from my 'raptured eyes tears slowly welled The tears of hopeless love; how my tongue strayed From fond and wooing speech, so sore afraid, That all my discourse was of time and tide, And of the stars which up in Heav'n abide. O words, alas! ye lack the skill to tell The dire confusion that upon me fell, Whilst love thus wracked me; nor can ye disclose My love's immensity, its pains and woes. Yet, though, for all, your powers be too weak, Perchance, ...
— The Tales Of The Heptameron, Vol. II. (of V.) • Margaret, Queen Of Navarre

... it isn't as easy to readjust as they think, they yammer around pop-eyed and say 'Oh, what wild young people—what naughty little wasters! They won't settle down and play Puss-in-the-corner at all—and, oh dear, oh dear, how they drink and smoke and curse 'n everything!'" ...
— Young People's Pride • Stephen Vincent Benet

... vous n'etes pas du tout gentille," he cried, in violent anger, for his moods knew no shading in their transposition from one to another; "you are cold and without heart. How long do you think that I stood there in the wet and hold you back from the mud, ...
— A Woman's Will • Anne Warner

... Deliciarum," was of a somewhat later time, but other examples still exist, among them the beautiful Niedermnster Gospels of the Abbess Uota, now at Munich. A wood-cut by Albert Drer prefixed to the first edition of Hrosvita's works (Nrnberg, 1501) represents the nun Hrosvita kneeling before the Emperor and beside the Archbishop Wilhelm of Mainz presenting her book.[21] As to the literary labours of Hrosvita, this is not the place to discuss them. She is simply an incidental figure in our view of the brilliant Court ...
— Illuminated Manuscripts • John W. Bradley

... Porto Rico, and Sir Francis Drake, who died off Porto Bello, where Hosier and the greater part of the crews of a noble British fleet perished a hundred and fifty years afterward, it is written in Hakluyt how—after running up N. and N.W. past Saba—the fleet 'stood away S.W., and on the 8th of November, being a Saturday, we came to an anker some 7 or 8 leagues off among certain broken Ilands called Las Virgines, which have bene accounted dangerous: but we found there a very good rode, had it bene ...
— At Last • Charles Kingsley

... {xusto}—the xystus, "a covered corridor in the gymnasium where the athletes exercised in winter." Vitruv. v. 11. 4; vi. 7. 5. See Rich, "Companion," s.n.; Becker, op. cit. p. 309. Cf. Plat. "Phaedr." 227—Phaedrus loq.: "I have come from Lysias the son of Cephalus, and I am going to take a walk outside the wall, for I have been sitting with him the whole morning; and our common friend Acumenus advises me to ...
— The Economist • Xenophon

... box with a slit in it, that hung beside the schoolhouse door, bearing the inscription, "Hospital Fund." He rattled it as he did so. "It's gettin' real heavy," he commented with satisfaction. "Reck'n there must 'a' bin a lot of sick folks lately. Teacher ...
— Kildares of Storm • Eleanor Mercein Kelly

... dey haids," Daddy January consoled her when she complained to him about it. "Dey gets all kind o' fool notions 'bout all kind o' fool t'ings. You ain't got to feel so bad—de Jedge is lots wuss'n yo' boss is. Yo' boss kin see de bugs he run atter, but my boss talk 'bout some kind o' bug he call Germ. I ax um what kind o' bug is dat; an' he 'low you can't see um wid yo' eye. I ain't say so to de Jedge, but I 'low when you see bug you can't ...
— Slippy McGee, Sometimes Known as the Butterfly Man • Marie Conway Oemler

... "D—n their fiddling," ejaculated one of the sailors; "I'd like to have 'em here just awhile. I'd bowstring 'em and show 'em what black eyes, and good old ...
— Jack Harkaway and his son's Escape From the Brigand's of Greece • Bracebridge Hemyng

... regular little joy, Though I fretted a little because it wasn't a boy: Wa'n't she a little flirt, though, with all her pouts and smiles? Why, settlers come to see that show ...
— Farm Ballads • Will Carleton

... on anything like that, you can drive her yourself, for I won't. I like her old grey dress. I wouldn't feel at home with her in any other. And she sha'n't be trimmed with crests to make an American holiday. She goes as she is, or not at all, ...
— My Friend the Chauffeur • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... folded her closely; his face bowed down to hers. There was a wordless moment, then the sound of a distant whistle, of nearer shouts of "T-r-a-i-n." The dark mustache, the unsinged side, was sweeping very, very near the soft ...
— Lanier of the Cavalry - or, A Week's Arrest • Charles King

... non-obstant le decret qui ordonne de respecter les monumens des arts, il confisquent la pendule.—Notez bien qu'il y avoit a cote une malle sur laquelle etoit l'adresse fleurdelisee du marchand.—Ici il n'y avoit pas moyen de aier que ce fut une belle et bonne fleur de lys; mais comme la malle ne valoit pas un corset, les Commissaires se contentent de rayer les lys, au lieu que la malheureuse pendule, ...
— A Residence in France During the Years 1792, 1793, 1794 and 1795, • An English Lady

... while "the Blackbird" African steam ship fussed its way out of the Mersey, having on board the British scape-goat sent away—"by the hand of a fit man"—one "Captain English"—into the wilderness of Fernando Po. "Unhappily," commented Burton, "I am not one of those independents who can say ce n'est que le premier pas qui coute." The stoic, however, after a fair fight, eventually vanquished the husband. Still he did not forget his wife; and in his Wanderings in West Africa, a record of this voyage, there is a very pretty compliment ...
— The Life of Sir Richard Burton • Thomas Wright

... to be tired," Mary said, her thin face quivering still with the effort she had made; "and they sha'n't tire you while I am here to protect you." And her protection never flagged. When Captain Price called, she asked him to please converse in a low tone, as noise was bad for her mother. "He had been here a good while before I came in," she defended herself ...
— Quaint Courtships • Howells & Alden, Editors

... and when they were about half-way across the little flat they saw the person on the bridge in the very act of burning it, and waving his hand in triumph; and the man who was riding abreast of him in front fired his carbine at him. As he did so the deserter wheeled on him, and said, "God d—n you—don't you know that's a woman," and springing on him like a tiger tore him from his horse; and, before they took in what he was doing, had, before their very eyes, flung both of them into a place where the current was running, and they had disappeared. ...
— The Burial of the Guns • Thomas Nelson Page

... to," he answered, frowning. "I mean I don't want to live with her; I sha'n't ever call her aunt again. I wouldn't have come in if I hadn't known she was out. I saw her going to market. I'm going off to Miller's Pond to fish for trout. You know it's Saturday and there's no school. Jim Bates is going with me and we're to be back by noon; ...
— Grandmother Elsie • Martha Finley

... N.B.—This is the Pip of our puzzle to Dickensian Students last week. The reference, chapter and verse, was given immediately by Mr. COMYNS CARR, who, on the spot received his reward, and went away rejoicing. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, November 5, 1892 • Various

... marrying Emigration Jane. The child of the Amalekite might never be brought home as bride to the Slabberts roof. But all the same, her style, which was that of the Alexandra Crescent, Kentish Town, London, N.W., and her manners, which were easy, and her taste in dress, which was dazzling, attracted him. As regards their spoken intercourse, it had been hampered by the Slabbertian habit of pretending only a limited acquaintance with the barbarous dialect of England. But a young man who conversed chiefly ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... unbiassed anthropological evidence. There are photographs. Let the reader turn over the pages of some such copiously illustrated work as The Living Races of Mankind, [Footnote: The Living Races of Mankind, by H. N. Hutchinson, J. W. Gregory, and R. Lydekker. (Hutchinson.)] and look into the eyes of one alien face after another. Are they not very like the people one knows? For the most part, one finds it hard to believe that, ...
— A Modern Utopia • H. G. Wells

... up a day or two since a Number of "N. & Q.," my attention was drawn to a new attempt to give a solution of the difficulty which has been the torment of commentators in the following passage from the Third ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 201, September 3, 1853 • Various

... goin' off, sooner 'n she's any right to," said Mike to Norah one day. "What puts such a notion in your head thin, Mike?" retorted Norah, "sure she's as foine a crayther as's in all the county, an' ...
— Hetty's Strange History • Anonymous

... supposed to be an alteration in the state of aggregation of the moved (that is, rubbing, etc.) bodies. If we assume that a certain quantity of motion v is expended in the conversion of a rubbing substance m into n, we must then have m v - n, and n m v; and when n is reconverted into m, v must appear again in some form ...
— A History of Science, Volume 3(of 5) • Henry Smith Williams

... hour or so Prince N. and Evgenie Pavlovitch and the old dignitary were hard at work endeavouring to restore the harmony of the evening, but it was of no avail, and very soon after the guests separated and ...
— The Idiot • (AKA Feodor Dostoevsky) Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... Pope with an attack on Three Hours after Marriage, that amusing and much-abused play, in Palaemon To Caelia at Bath; Or, The Triumvirate (1717). Pope is said to have collaborated with Gay not only in Three Hours, a play "so lewd,/ Ev'n Bullies blush'd, and Beaux astonish'd stood" (Second Edition, p. 11), but in The Wife of Bath and The What D'Ye Call It. Welsted also hits at God's Revenge Against Punning, the First Psalm, praises Tickell, and finds Pope's versification flat. All of these charges (except the one that ...
— Two Poems Against Pope - One Epistle to Mr. A. Pope and the Blatant Beast • Leonard Welsted

... "Heav'n rest his saul, whare'er he be! Is th' wish o' mony mae than me: He had twa faults, or maybe three, Yet what remead?[11] Ae social, honest man ...
— Halleck's New English Literature • Reuben P. Halleck

... company, I started, thinking I could get there before the letter would, as they were generally much longer in going than one could travel. When I got on the Northern Belle, a fine boat, one of my children was taken with croup. Dr. N——, a Universalist minister, got off at Dubuque and bought medicine for me. This saved the child, but he was sick all the way. We were stuck in Beef Slough for several days. I never left the cabin as my child needed me, but some ...
— Old Rail Fence Corners - The A. B. C's. of Minnesota History • Various

... be added the forward elevating plane L, the rear elevator, or tail M, and the vertical steering rudder N. ...
— Aeroplanes • J. S. Zerbe***

... said; "you 've got rheumatism anyway, so you don't care if you take cold, but I ain't very anxious to, 'n' so I think we 'd ...
— Susan Clegg and Her Neighbors' Affairs • Anne Warner

... N.B.—I leave this as it is, though it is unjust to the Duke of Wellington; but such as my impressions were at the time they shall remain, to be corrected afterwards when necessary. It would be very wrong to impute selfishness to him in the ordinary sense of the ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. II • Charles C. F. Greville

... Court. The ship was commanded by a man of very ordinary capacity. The mate was a mere sailor, wanting in intelligence and worth, and a fit associate for the captain. The ship and her valuable cargo were actually n charge of the supercargo, a Mr. Parker, of New York, who was also part owner. He resided on shore and seldom visited the ship. It was at his instance I found an asylum in the Charity along with the officers ...
— Jack in the Forecastle • John Sherburne Sleeper

... shot, Rob," broke in Tubby, who had, of course, immediately turned toward the spot indicated. "See the way he swings the light around and makes all manner of figures in the air with the same. Why, that was the letter N, as sure as you live. And there goes E, followed by W and S. What does that spell but NEWS? Hey! we're on the track ...
— The Boy Scouts on Belgian Battlefields • Lieut. Howard Payson

... "D—n it," hiccuped Shingle, "wont stand this any longer, by JuJu jupiter! Give over your practicals, Lucifer. Confound it, Don, give over—do, now, you mad long legged son of a gun!"—Here the Don caught Shingle round the waist, and whipping ...
— Tom Cringle's Log • Michael Scott

... solitude, and embodying itself in symbols which are the nearest possible representations of the feeling in the exact shape in which it exists in the poet's mind." [Footnote: J. S. Mill, "Thoughts on Poetry," in Dissertations, vol. 1. See also F. N. Scott, "The Most Fundamental Differentia of Poetry and Prose." Published by Modern Language Association, 19, 2.] But whether his primary aim be the relief of his own feelings (for a man swears even when he is alone!) ...
— A Study of Poetry • Bliss Perry

... as I care to lug—that's certain! Dorey, go and stir down the clo'es in the boilin' suds, and be quick about it, too! Don't ye know better'n to stand starin' at folks like a sick cat?" This, to a little girl, presumably the herald of Joyce's approach, who had been peeping in through the ...
— Joyce's Investments - A Story for Girls • Fannie E. Newberry

... "It's no go, cap'n," cried Brian, whose horse had leapt into the lead and was trying to bolt. "There's a party coming straight for us. Let's make a stand and give 'em a taste of ...
— Under the Rebel's Reign • Charles Neufeld

... to wear knickerbockers," murmured the Virginian. "She'd look a heap better 'n some o' them college students. And she'll set on potatoes, ...
— The Virginian - A Horseman Of The Plains • Owen Wister

... Pat'ick O'Go'man. He is a Kelt and all that. Spells Pat'ick with eva so many letters. You know. They say he spends ouas and ouas lea'ning E'se. He wo'ies about it. They all t'y to lea'n E'se, and it wo'ies them and makes them hate England ...
— Soul of a Bishop • H. G. Wells

... Schwarte's book, Die Technik Im Weltkriege,[1] tells us "specially organised and trained troops" were required for the purpose. Prisoners taken later revealed the German methods. Gas officers and N.C.O.'s, after making a careful survey of the front line trench, organised the digging of deep narrow trenches at suitable places below the surface of the main trench, just underneath the parapet. The heavy gas cylinders, weighing ...
— by Victor LeFebure • J. Walker McSpadden

... talk about you, they talked about one that was better'n any of us. I was reading the other day about the respectable ones in their days complaining how Christ eat with publicans and sinners," Mrs. Blake said, giving me one of ...
— Medoline Selwyn's Work • Mrs. J. J. Colter

... Lanier in 1870. (Photogravure.) Frontispiece Sidney Lanier at the age of fifteen, in 1857 Sidney Lanier in 1866, from a "carte de visite" photograph in possession of Mr. Milton H. Northrup, of Syracuse, N.Y. Mary Day Lanier in 1873 Facsimile of one of Lanier's earliest existing musical scores, written at the age of 19 Facsimile of letter to Charlotte Cushman Bronze bust of ...
— Sidney Lanier • Edwin Mims

... characters upon strips of white paper, which are attached to the door with rice-paste; and there are many kinds of them. Some are texts selected from sutras—such as the S[^u]tra of Transcendent Wisdom (Prag[n]a-P[^a]ramit[^a]-Hridaya-S[^u]tra), or the S[^u]tra of the Lotos of the Good Law (Saddharma-Pundarik[^a]-S[^u]tra). Some are texts from the dh[^a]ran[^i]s,—which are magical. Some are invocations only, indicating the Buddhist sect ...
— The Romance of the Milky Way - And Other Studies & Stories • Lafcadio Hearn

... Moffat is astonished at the South African notion that the sea was accidentally created by a girl. Charlevoix says, "Les sauvages sont d'une facilite a croire ce qu'on leur dit, que les plus facheuse experiences n'ont jamais pu guerir".(1) But it is a curious fact that while savages are, as a rule, so credulous, they often laugh at the religious doctrines taught them by missionaries. Elsewhere they recognise certain essential doctrines as familiar forms of ...
— Myth, Ritual, and Religion, Vol. 1 • Andrew Lang

... said the tired, but by no means exhausted, Mrs. Tuck, "I ain't forgettin' their innards, ef thet's what you're thinkin' of. You just tell Silas to kill four broilers, an' I'll clean 'em to-night. Thet'll give me a start, and to-morow I c'n do a few dozen pies. I hev got some mince-meat, thank goodness! an' you c'n get me in some of them early apples in the morning. Seems like I'm not going to ...
— Through stained glass • George Agnew Chamberlain

... this Comet not before Decemb. 4/14, (though he conceives it might have been seen since Novemb. 23 st. n.) & he saw it no longer then Feb. 3/13: though several others have seen it both sooner, and later: and though himself continued to look out for it till March 7. st. n. but fruitlesly, whereof he thinks the reason to have been its too ...
— Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society - Vol 1 - 1666 • Various

... pounced on a Brobdingnagian volume upon the desk and worried it open at a marker. It had been meant for a ledger, that huge volume; the gray cloth covers bore the legend "N to Z." Ledger it was, of a grim sort, with sinister entries of forgotten sins, the itemized strength or weakness of a thousand men. The confidential clerk ran a long, confidential finger along the spidery copperplate index ...
— Copper Streak Trail • Eugene Manlove Rhodes

... value of religion myself, not to wish that my children should have so much of it (I speak of feeling, not of creed) as is compatible with reason. I have no ambition for them, and can only further say in the dying words of Julie, 'N'en faites point des savans—faites-en des hommes bienfaisans et justes.' If they are this, they will be more than their father ever was, and all he ...
— Critical Miscellanies (Vol. 3 of 3) - Essay 7: A Sketch • John Morley

... and my maiden grace Did fondly clip and strain, As in his arms, so in his soul's embrace, And from mine eyes Love's fire did drink amain, And time that glides apace In nought but courting me to spend was fain Whom courteous I did deign Ev'n as my peer to entreat; But am of ...
— The Decameron, Volume I • Giovanni Boccaccio

... morning at 4.15 A.M. We did rear-guard to the Division, but we had an easy time of it, the Dorsets being in rear. I had also the 27th Brigade R.F.A., the N.I. Horse under Massereene, and 70 cyclists to help, but the Germans never pursued us or fired a shot. It was awfully hot again, but we had not far to go—only eleven miles—into Montge. There we arrived at 10.45 A.M., and should have been there much sooner if it had not been for some of the Divisional ...
— The Doings of the Fifteenth Infantry Brigade - August 1914 to March 1915 • Edward Lord Gleichen

... nuthin'—nuthin' but what those lousy fellers believe when they've bin hittin' the bottle too long—a sort of great animal that lives up yonder," he jerked his head northwards, "quick as lightning in its tracks, an' bigger'n anything else in the Bush, an' ain't supposed to be very ...
— The Wendigo • Algernon Blackwood

... I receive from children there has been an urgent appeal for me to write a story that will take Trot and Cap'n Bill to the Land of Oz, where they will meet Dorothy and Ozma. Also they think Button-Bright ought to get acquainted with Ojo the Lucky. As you know, I am obliged to talk these matters over with Dorothy by means of the "wireless," for that is the only way I can communicate with ...
— Tik-Tok of Oz • L. Frank Baum

... Marivaux consist? In general, one may say, in his treatment of love, their prevailing theme. "Chez mes confreres," says Marivaux, "l'amour est en querelle avec ce qui l'environne, et finit par etre heureux, malgre les opposants; chez moi, il n'est en querelle qu'avec lui seul, et finit par etre heureux malgre lui. Il apprendra dans mes pieces a se defier encore plus des tours qu'il se joue, que des pieges qui lui sont tendus par des mains etrangeres." It is true that ...
— A Selection from the Comedies of Marivaux • Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de Marivaux

... he said, in his young blindness. "We'll start out—and you won't know where we're going. I sha'n't tell you. I'll pick out the best place in the world, if I can find it, and you won't know where we're going till we get there.... Won't that be bully?... I hate to go now, dear, but you're all out of sorts—and I'll have a heap of things to do—to get ready. So will you." He stopped and looked ...
— Youth Challenges • Clarence B Kelland

... "D—n Cuddie!" retorted the dragoon, "he'll be hanged in good earnest, I hope. I saw him today at Milnwood with his old puritanical b—of a mother, and if I had thought I was to have had him cast in my dish, I would have brought him up at my horse's tail—we ...
— Old Mortality, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... "Prayer," "reading," and "meditation" [*Hugh of St. Victor, Alleg. in N.T. iii, 4] are said to belong to the contemplative life. Again, "hearing" belongs to the contemplative life: since it is stated that Mary (by whom the contemplative life is signified) "sitting . . . at the Lord's feet, heard His word" (Luke 10:39). Therefore ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... the street eagerly discussing the quantity of tail required for a boy's kite; and one graybeard undertook the sport of flying it, volunteering the information that he was a boy, "always was a boy, and d—n a man who was not a boy inside, however ancient outside!" Mines, morals, politics, the immortality of the soul, etc., were discussed beneath shade-trees and in saloons, the time for each being governed apparently by ...
— The Mountains of California • John Muir

... ground and pressing forward bravely. Suddenly he gave a shout of joy, for on a rise on the flank of the Ashantis appeared the sailors of the Barraconta, who had been led round from the boats by Lieutenant Wells, R. N., who was in command. The instant these took up their position they opened a heavy fire upon the flank of the Ashantis, who, dismayed by this attack by fresh foes, lost heart and at once fled hastily. In ...
— By Sheer Pluck - A Tale of the Ashanti War • G. A. Henty

... the top of the Hump he whispered to her, "I'm afraid Nurse would see me, so I sha'n't be able to ...
— The Little White Bird - or Adventures In Kensington Gardens • J. M. Barrie

... preference is shown for the man who has proved his honesty and capacity in the municipality, or as the leader of his trade union. All the miners' representatives are tried and experienced men. Mr. G.N. Barnes, M.P., was for ten years the general secretary of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers. Mr. Clynes, M.P., was elected to the office of district secretary of the Gas Workers' and General Labourers' Union twenty years ago; Mr. Will Thorne, M.P., has been general secretary of the same ...
— The Rise of the Democracy • Joseph Clayton

... part de tes miseres, Moi ton fils. France, tu verras bien qu'humble tete eclipsee J'avais foi, Et que je n'eus jamais dans l'ame une pensee Que pour toi. France, etre sur ta claie a l'heure ou l'on te traine Aux cheveux, O ma mere, et porter mon anneau de ta chaine Je ...
— Jeremiah • George Adam Smith

... School. William Wordsworth. Poetical Canons. The Excursion and Sonnets. An Estimate. Robert Southey. His Writings. Historical Value. S. T. Coleridge. Early Life. His Helplessness. Hartley and H. N. Coleridge. ...
— English Literature, Considered as an Interpreter of English History - Designed as a Manual of Instruction • Henry Coppee

... papers, entries, indorsements, and other documentary evidence in relation to any proceeding in connection with such application; and that he also inform this House whether, since the adjournment at Raleigh, N.C., on the 30th of March last, of the last board or court of inquiry convened to investigate the facts attending the hanging of a number of United States soldiers for alleged desertion from the rebel army, any further measures have been taken to bring ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 2 (of 2) of Volume 6: Andrew Johnson • James D. Richardson

... plumage of the raven. A deep quiet smile dwelt continually on his features; but with all the quiet it was a cruel smile, such a one as would have graced the countenance of a Nero. "Mais en revanche personne n'etoit plus honnete." "Caballero," said he, "allow me to introduce myself to you as the alcayde of this prison. I perceive by this paper that I am to have the honour of your company for a time, a short time doubtless, beneath this roof; I hope you will banish every apprehension from your mind. ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... d'autres dans ce recueil, nos lecteurs, habitues maintenant a 1'etrangete des expressions si souvent employees par Kheyam pour rendre ses pensees sur l'amour divin, et a la singularite des images trop orientales, d'une sensualite quelquefois revoltante, n'auront pas de peine a se persuader qu'il s'agit de la Divinite, bien que cette conviction soit vivement discutee par les moullahs musulmans, et meme par beaucoup de laiques, qui rougissent veritablement d'une pareille licence ...
— Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam • Omar Khayyam

... "N-no," she answered, wiping at her eyes. "Of c-course I don't. It's just that it makes me so d-darn mad to see everything go wrong ...
— Fifty Per Cent Prophet • Gordon Randall Garrett

... being their ordinary places, though upon occasion of the ballot they descend, and sit where they are shown by K, K at each of the outward urns L, L. Those M, M that sit with their tables, and the bowls N, N before them, upon the halfspace or second step of the tribunal from the floor, are the clerks or secretaries of the house. Upon the short seats O, O on the floor (which should have been represented by woolsacks) sit: P, the two tribunes ...
— The Commonwealth of Oceana • James Harrington

... disagreeable, or would not be if it were play People hardly ever do know where to be born until it is too late Spider-web is stronger than a cable Undemonstrative affection Very busy about nothing Wearisome part is the waiting on the people who do the work Why did n't the people who were sleepy go to bed? Willing to do any amount of work if it is called play Willing to repent if he could think of anything ...
— Quotes and Images From The Works of Charles Dudley Warner • Charles Dudley Warner

... and I must find some way to circumvent him. I'll be even with him. He sha'n't beat me, the overbearing, hectoring brute. It's between him and me, and I think I'm ...
— The Passenger from Calais • Arthur Griffiths

... stipulation made by Sir Henry Clinton for their welfare was not only grossly violated, but he sent out expeditions in various sections to plunder and kill the inhabitants, and scourge the country generally. One of these under Tarleton surprised Colonel Buford and his Virginia regiment at Waxhaw, N. C., and while negotiations were pending for a surrender, the Americans, without notice, were suddenly attacked and massacred in cold blood. Colonel Buford and one hundred of his men saved themselves ...
— American Prisoners of the Revolution • Danske Dandridge

... says the officer, condemning his own lack of comprehension by the tone of his voice. "Aha, I-n-g-i-l-i-s, aha!" and he looks over the crowd apologetically for not having thought of so simple a thing before. But having ascertained that I speak English, he now proceeds to treat me to a voluble discourse in simon-pure Persian. Seeing that I fail to comprehend the tenor of the officer's ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle Volume II. - From Teheran To Yokohama • Thomas Stevens

... would amount to holding fellowship with them: except perhaps when certain holy men, by special instinct or Divine revelation, make use of the demons' actions in order to obtain certain results: thus we read of the Blessed James [*the Greater; cf. Apocrypha, N.T., Hist. Certam. Apost. vi, 19] that he caused Hermogenes to be brought to him, by the instrumentality of ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... the steerage where the second-classers sleep, For there's near a hundred for'ard, and they're stowed away like sheep, — They are trav'lers for the most part in a straight 'n' honest path; But their linen's rather scanty, an' there isn't any bath — Stowed away like ewes and wethers that is shore 'n' marked 'n' draft. But the shearers of the shearers always seem to travel aft; In the cushioned cabins, aft, With saloons 'n' smoke-rooms, aft — There is sheets 'n' best ...
— In the Days When the World Was Wide and Other Verses • Henry Lawson

... "you are to stay in the dining-room with a candle, and do your sewing. You are not wanted in the salon; I sha'n't have you looking into my hand ...
— The Celibates - Includes: Pierrette, The Vicar of Tours, and The Two Brothers • Honore de Balzac

... souvient-il, nous voguions en silence; On n'entendait au loin, sur l'onde et sous les cieux, Que le bruit des rameurs qui frappaient en cadence Tes flots harmonieux. O lac! rochers muets! grottes! foret obscure! Vous que le temps epargne ou qu'il peut rajeunir Gardez de cette nuit, gardez, belle ...
— The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and - Modern Times • Alfred Biese

... the prophecy in that it had its origin in our own country, thus connecting its wonders with the work of the two-horned beast. Commencing in Hydesville, N.Y., in the family of Mr. John D. Fox, in the latter part of March, 1848, it spread with incredible rapidity through all the States. The estimates of the number of spiritualists in this country at the present time, only twenty-six short ...
— The United States in the Light of Prophecy • Uriah Smith

... to treat 'em with some perliteness, too they're older'n anything 'round here 'cept the rocks; and they've been holdin' up the dignity of this valley, too,—kind o' 'sponsible for things. That's another thing ye mustn't forgit. The fust folks that come travellin' through this notch—'bout time the Injins quit,—took notice on 'em, I tell ye. ...
— The Veiled Lady - and Other Men and Women • F. Hopkinson Smith

... n'a que nous," says the lady, looking to her lord; and the boy, who understood her, though doubtless she thought otherwise, thanked her with all his heart for ...
— Henry Esmond; The English Humourists; The Four Georges • William Makepeace Thackeray

... seen that there are four large points—N, S, E, and W—the cardinal points above referred to, and that these are subdivided by twelve smaller points, with one little black triangular point between each, and a multitude of smaller points ...
— Man on the Ocean - A Book about Boats and Ships • R.M. Ballantyne

... capacity," interposed Seth, thinking that the other was merely keeping back his decision until he heard what terms might be offered him, and that a practical suggestion about money matters would settle the matter, "why, mister, we sha'n't grumble about the dollars, you bet! As yer knows, the Kernel kinder invited yer jest now, when we had no sort o' reckonin' as to who and what yer were. Tharr'll be no worry about yer share ov the plunder, ...
— Picked up at Sea - The Gold Miners of Minturne Creek • J.C. Hutcheson

... about Wendy; watch her elevate an already tip-tilted nose at displeasing food, or a tainted dish, and notice her look of abject contempt for the giver as she turns away in disgust. No lover of the Pekingese should be without a charming little book Some Pekingese Pets by M.N. Daniel, with delightful sketches by the author, in which we are told that, "Until the year, 1860, so far as is known, no 'Foreign Devil' had ever seen one of these Imperial Lion Dogs. In that year, ...
— Grain and Chaff from an English Manor • Arthur H. Savory

... enmity. One of the Virginians was the son of Colonel Robert E. Lee, of the Second United States Cavalry; the two others who seemed instinctively to form a staff for Lee, were town-Virginians from Petersburg. A fourth outsider came from Cincinnati and was half Kentuckian, N. L. Anderson, Longworth on the mother's side. For the first time Adams's education brought him in contact with new types and taught him their values. He saw the New England type measure itself with another, and he ...
— The Education of Henry Adams • Henry Adams

... hearts go. And nothing would do at last but he must stay and live the same scenes for a little; and father told him 't wouldn't pay;—they weren't so much to go through with as to tell of,—there was too much prose in the daily life, and too much dirt, and 't wa'n't fit for gentlemen. Oh, he said, he'd been used to roughing it,—woodsing, camping and gunning and yachting, ever since he'd been a free man. He was Canadian, and had been cruising from the St. Lawrence to Florida, —and now, as his companions would go on without him, he had a mind to try a bit ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 9, No. 55, May, 1862 • Various

... the young man, 'I will help you take home the horse, who will go well enough with me, and I will tell the master that the delay was no fault of your'n. A balky horse ought not to be trusted to a child ...
— The Wandering Jew, Complete • Eugene Sue

... if you'd ever seen me bossin' the fireworks at Tompkins Square, in little old N. Y., I guess you ...
— Boy Scouts in the Philippines - Or, The Key to the Treaty Box • G. Harvey Ralphson

... Captain Courtenay, R.N., and his wife are not such distinguished personages, but their romance had a sequel worthy of its unusual beginning. They were married quietly a week after the Kansas reached London. There was some war scare in full blast at the moment, and a Lord of the Admiralty ...
— The Captain of the Kansas • Louis Tracy

... "Go on," "We can stand it," came from all parts of the hall, and Mrs. Hawkins said to Olive Green, "He's a beautiful speaker. I could listen to him all night if it wa'n't for gettin' breakfast for my boarders. My bread didn't ris worth a cent, and I've got to git up airly ...
— The Further Adventures of Quincy Adams Sawyer and Mason's Corner Folks • Charles Felton Pidgin

... often on young girls who see the roulette tables and their crowds for the first time. Above the clink of coin, the rustle of bank-notes, the click-click of the ivory ball upon the disc, and the low hum of voices, there rose the monotonous voices of the croupiers: "Rien n'va plus!" "Quatre premier deux pieces!" "Zero! un louis!" "Dernier douzaine un piece!" "Messieurs, faites ...
— The Count's Chauffeur • William Le Queux

... she said, 'you didn't understand, then, that I brought you here to breakfast. We sha'n't die of hunger here. We can help ourselves ...
— Abbe Mouret's Transgression - La Faute De L'abbe Mouret • Emile Zola

... in Dublin, N.H., under the auspices of Rev. Levi W. Leonard, minister of the Unitarian church in that village, the first library in the country that was free to all the inhabitants of a town or city. In the adjoining town of Peterboro, in 1833, under the ...
— Unitarianism in America • George Willis Cooke

... actors and actresses, when we think what they have to go through with. The other night at Watertown, N. Y., Miss Ada Gray was playing "Camille," and in the dying scene, where she breathes her last, to slow music, an accident occurred which broke her all up. She was surrounded by sorrowing friends, who were ...
— Peck's Sunshine - Being a Collection of Articles Written for Peck's Sun, - Milwaukee, Wis. - 1882 • George W. Peck

... over a country without water, in the heat of summer, to the oracle of [Jupiter] Hammon, and quickly passed over the Bay of Pamphylia, when, by Divine Providence, the sea was cut off—thus Providence restraining the sea on his account, as it had sent him rain when he traveled [over the desert]." N. B.—Since, in the days of Josephus, as he assures us, all the more numerous original historians of Alexander gave the account he has here set down, as to the providential going back of the waters of the ...
— The Antiquities of the Jews • Flavius Josephus

... Chanties, the words by Frederick J. Davis, R.N.R., the music composed and arranged upon traditional sailor airs by Ferris ...
— The Shanty Book, Part I, Sailor Shanties • Richard Runciman Terry

... Crossing to Scutari in the steam ferryboat, we walked some distance till we reached the mosque, where the services were just commencing. The attendant who admitted us intimated that we must remove our boots and put on the slippers provided. N—— did so, but I objected, and the man was satisfied with my wearing them over my boots. We were conducted up a steep, ladder-like staircase to a small gallery, with a low front only a foot high, with no seats but sheepskins on the floor, where we were expected to curl ourselves ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - Vol. XVII, No. 102. June, 1876. • Various

... Barillon has given the best account of this debate. I will extract his report of Mordaunt's speech. "Milord Mordaunt, quoique jeune, parla avec eloquence et force. Il dit que la question n'etoit pas reduite, comme la Chambre des Communes le pretendoit, a guerir des jalousies et defiances, qui avoient lieu dans les choses incertaines; mais que ce qui ce passoit ne l'etoit pas, qu'il y avoit une armee sur pied qui subsistoit, et qui etoit remplie d'officiers Catholiques, ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 2 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... appointed Brigadier General in February, 1777, and ordered to join General Washington's army at Morristown, N. J., in April of the same year. He was given command of the "Pennsylvania Line" consisting of two brigades of four regiments each, with a total strength of about 1,700 men. His activity and alertness during the summer, in harassing and annoying the enemy, went far ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 2 of 8 • Various

... N is the Negro, rambling free In his far distant home, Delighting 'neath the palm trees' shade And ...
— The Anti-Slavery Alphabet • Anonymous

... d'autrefois, vertes saisons ou Vous avez fui pour toujours Je ne vois plus le ciel bleu Je n'entends plus les chants joyeux des oiseaux En emportant mon bonheur, O bien aime tu t'en es alle Et c'est en ...
— Paradise Garden - The Satirical Narrative of a Great Experiment • George Gibbs

... ciphers, his trophies, and subsequently his eagles, splendidly adorned the monuments of his reign. But why did he wish to stamp false initials on things with which neither he nor his reign had any connection; as, for example the old Louvre? Did he imagine that the letter, "N" which everywhere obtruded itself on the eye, had in it a charm to controvert the records of history, or alter ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... N was a Nut that grew High up upon a tree; Papa, who could not reach it, said, "That's ...
— Nonsense Books • Edward Lear

... sounds that ever grated the ears of a Vandal; thus, rasped, scratched, wrenched, bridled, fangled, birchen, hardened, strengthened, quickened, &c. almost frighten us when written as they are actually pronounced, as rapt, scratcht, wrencht, bridl'd, fangl'd, birch'n, strength'n'd, quick'n'd, &c.; they become still more formidable when used contractedly in the solemn style, which never ought to be the case; for here instead of thou strength'n'st or strength'n'd'st, thou quick'n'st or quick'n'd'st, we ought to pronounce thou strength'nest or strength'nedst, ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... them," replied I, "and we may as well put them down on the log-board—North Foreland Light N.N.W. 1/4 W. Why, we should see the Tongue buoy. Now we'll drop the anchor and furl the sails, if you please, sir—we can do nothing at present." We did so: the fog came on thicker than before, and with it a drizzling rain and wind from the S. At dusk there was no change, ...
— Poor Jack • Frederick Marryat

... like this? "Was there ever such a senseless, stupid creature as I am? How have I managed to keep so long out of the idiot asylum? Undertook to write a poem, and stuck fast at the first verse. Had a call from a friend who had just been round the world. Did n't ask him one word about what he had seen or heard, but gave him full details of my private history, I having never been off my own hearth-rug for more than an hour or two at a time, while he was circumnavigating and circumrailroading the ...
— Over the Teacups • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... Reddy, "but ef yuh can remember that far back, you'll rec-lect that his pals told us he held a world's record fer five miles. Waal, now, they must 'a' been lots o' professionals runnin' thet distance, and in spite of everythin' they never did no better'n thet. What've yuh got to say ...
— Bert Wilson in the Rockies • J. W. Duffield

... rough, there's no doubt about that. Rough for all hands, I guess. And I hope you understand, Mr. Sylvester, that there ain't many men I'd trust to do what I ask you to. I appreciate your doin' it more'n I can tell you. Be as—as gentle as you ...
— Cap'n Warren's Wards • Joseph C. Lincoln

... was still; then, findin' himself in a confidential crowd, and bustin' to let us know, his trouble, he told us all about it. He'd never spoke to the girl, it seems, more'n to say, 'How-d'ye-do, ma'am,' and blush, and sit on his hat, and make curious moves with them hands and feet; but there come another ...
— Mr. Scraggs • Henry Wallace Phillips

... charged with a letter which he was himself to put into the hands of Mr. Webb, before the steamer left the dock. "But how am I to know the gentleman?" asked the courier; "I never saw him in my life." "N'importe," was the reply. "Put the letter in the hand of the noblest-looking man on board, and you will be sure to be right." The courier followed the direction; and, stationing himself near the gangway, ...
— A Walk from London to John O'Groat's • Elihu Burritt

... Pleydell-Bouverie has endowed the novel-writing fraternity with a new formula for the composition of titles. After J. S.; or, Trivialities there is no reason why we should not have A. B.; or, Platitudes, M.N.; or, Sentimentalisms, Y.Z.; or, Inanities. There are many books which these simple titles would characterise much more aptly than any high-flown phrases—as aptly, in fact, as Mr. Bouverie's title characterises the volume before us. It sets forth the uninteresting ...
— Reviews • Oscar Wilde

... That takes its flight Soon as't has stol'n a chicken, Thou bear'st away My heart, thy prey, And leav'st me here to sicken. Three night-caps, too, And garters blue, That did to legs belong Smooth to the sight As marble white, And faith, almost as strong. Two thousand ...
— Wit and Wisdom of Don Quixote • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

... it ain't readin', it's eatin'. Work all day to get a meal that don't last more'n fifteen minutes, and then see readin' goin' on till long past bedtime, and oil goin' up every six months. Which'll you have—fresh ...
— Flower of the Dusk • Myrtle Reed

... icicles if he wanted to," Bunny had answered. "Anyhow, the second snowball has to go on top of the bottom one and make the body. Then you cut legs out of the bottom snowball. You can cut the legs, 'cause I'm taller 'n you and I can reach ...
— Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Sunny South • Laura Lee Hope

... in the world,' said the husband, 'il n'y a que ca—there is nothing else worth while. A man, look you, who sticks in his own village like a bear,' he went on, '—very well, he sees nothing. And then death is the end of all. And he has ...
— An Inland Voyage • Robert Louis Stevenson



Words linked to "N" :   gas, azote, letter, alphabetic character, nitrogen, air, N'Djamena, letter of the alphabet, northward



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