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Deary   /dˈɪri/   Listen
Deary

noun
1.
A special loved one.  Synonyms: darling, dearie, ducky, favorite, favourite, pet.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Deary" Quotes from Famous Books



... her; she was, indeed, very shy. "Dear, dear," was all she said; "deary me, think of this, it's very kind of you, I'm sure," squeezing my hand the while as if it had ...
— The Wings of Icarus - Being the Life of one Emilia Fletcher • Laurence Alma Tadema

... 'Deary me, now she is going to preach,' thought Patty; but she rather liked Aunt Pen's preachments, for a good deal of fun got mixed up with the moralising; and she was so good herself that children could never say in their naughty little minds, 'You are ...
— Aunt Jo's Scrap-Bag • Louisa M. Alcott

... it's much best so," exclaimed the old woman; "but, deary-dear!" she added as I burst into a fit of sobbing, "how can I be ...
— The Strand Magazine, Volume V, Issue 26, February 1893 - An Illustrated Monthly • Various

... "Deary me!" said Mrs. Owen, "what shall I do? I wish I'd never tried to dress up at all. Just think how much that cost, and it's only a stringy thing after all, and a great big rent in it before its ever worn at all. I wish now, ...
— Clemence - The Schoolmistress of Waveland • Retta Babcock

... day!—'There's for you! Let me repeat it'—I count every hour of this little absence for a day!—'Mind, too, the wit of the good man! One may see love is a new thing to him. Here is a very tedious time gone since he saw his deary; no less than, according to his amorous calculation, a dozen days and nights, at least! and yet, TEDIOUS as it is, it is but a LITTLE ABSENCE. Well said, my good, accurate, and consistent brother!—But wise men in love ...
— Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded • Samuel Richardson

... Ferrara, for instance, than a healthy, happy, English village. I do not know whether it is known to the committee, that Erith is the village described in Dickens' Household Words, as Dumble-down-deary, and that it is a most graphic and correct description of the state of the place, attributable to the unhealthy character of ...
— Draining for Profit, and Draining for Health • George E. Waring

... restless, and eager to get home to tell Bessie the wonderful news. It was the longest afternoon I ever saw, but at length it passed and I hurried home. As Bessie met me at the door I said eagerly, "I've got a surprise for you, deary." ...
— That Mother-in-Law of Mine • Anonymous

... deary me!" murmured the little old lady, patting her shoulder. "Somebody has been treating you badly, I know. And you've come right to your Aunt Alviry for comfort. And you've come to the right place, my pretty girl, for I've got tons of ...
— Ruth Fielding of the Red Mill • Alice B. Emerson

... dark! Oh, you modest maiden! Fairy princess. [LYUBOV GORDEYEVNA goes out] Well, really, wasn't some one there with her? [Looks into the corner] But I'm a silly old woman, I suspected some one! [Lights the candles] Oh, deary me, some trouble will be sure to come in my old age. [EGORUSHKA enters] Go along, Egorushka, and call the girls in from the neighbors; tell them Pelageya Egorovna told you to invite them to ...
— Plays • Alexander Ostrovsky

... now's de time! Git up quick, deary, but fer de Lawd's sake doan' make no noise! Follow de ole woman—dis way.' I got up at once and obeyed her. It was a ghastly sort of thing, this Marse Edwin business, but I saw a chance of escape at the bottom of it. We went to the lower part of the house on tip-toe, ...
— The Statesmen Snowbound • Robert Fitzgerald

... "Deary," said she, "you will have to go to this place in the morning and try what you can do. Tell Mrs. O'Connor that I am sick, and that you are my daughter and will do the work, and try and do the best you can ...
— Mary, Mary • James Stephens

... remember it all now. Oh, how stupid I've been, to be sure!' It was an intense relief to have chased successfully the truant halfpence. 'Now, Queenie,' went on Theo gleefully, 'in five minutes I shall be ready for you, and we are going to have a good time in the boat. Get your hat on, deary.' ...
— The Captain's Bunk - A Story for Boys • M. B. Manwell

... "Deary me, but I'm glad you're well again," said good Mrs. Pratt, as she leaned over the now restored patient. "I thought ye were a goner sure, till comin' on mornin'. An' how do ye feel ...
— Honor Edgeworth • Vera

... "Deary me, Esther, what with one thing and another, namely buying a sofa, thirty shillings as I'm a sinner, I have forgot to tell you about my second, and it's a girl this time, my man saying he would like a change. ...
— Sentimental Tommy - The Story of His Boyhood • J. M. Barrie

... sheepskins being spun into golden fleeces. But he doesn't seem to get any new light that way, and Up-Hill is not doing well without him. Fold and farm are needing the master's eye and hand; and it will be a poor lambing season for us, I think, wanting Steve. And, deary me, Charlotte, one word from ...
— The Squire of Sandal-Side - A Pastoral Romance • Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

... deary; he wants you to get well. You owe it to him and your father to get well—as well as your great and lifelong sorrow permits. Now, deary, take a little more stimulant, and then don't talk. I've explained everything, and shown you your duty; and I know that my ...
— His Sombre Rivals • E. P. Roe

... Montalesso!" persisted Dulcie, pulling a face. "No, you dinky, deary Cousin Clare, you'll never persuade me to like school again! I shall catch a cold on purpose as soon as I go back, and then you'll have to bring me over here for the sake of a warmer climate. I'll bribe the ...
— The Princess of the School • Angela Brazil

... cried Polly, in alarm. "I've only red paper enough to go on the broken one, so if anything happens to the other one, deary me! I don't know whatever in the world we could do. Now run and get the cup of paste in the woodshed, and in the shake of a lobster's whisker I'll have it all ...
— The Adventures of Joel Pepper • Margaret Sidney

... opening her lips to protest, suddenly closed them again, fascinated by the sight of the gold. She clutched the coin, and became friendly and familiar in a moment. "Help me downstairs, deary," she said, "and put me into a cab. I'm afraid of ...
— The Fallen Leaves • Wilkie Collins

... what would my lord say if he were down! And they are so beautiful! they will look so fine! Deary me, how they sparkle! But you will wear much finer when you are ...
— Alice, or The Mysteries, Book I • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... deary me!" said the king, "has Jack Frost gone to bother Mother Nature? I meant he should wait for me this year. But something must be done. Ho! Snowflake, come here, and bring your ...
— Buttercup Gold and Other Stories • Ellen Robena Field

... "Now, deary, if you don't feel right about mother's going," her mother resumed a little later as she poked her head into the kitchen, "just say so. But I certainly want to see that town burnt up; and besides, it's teaching Luke history. ...
— The Gorgeous Girl • Nalbro Bartley

... earthquake shocks, and always by the most terrible and devastating circumstances that can possibly combine to ruin a country in a few hours. A clear, serene day is followed by the darkest night; the delightful view offered by woods and prairies is diverted into the deary waste of a cruel winter; the tallest and most robust cedar trees are uprooted, broken off bodily, and hurled into a heap; roofs, balconies, and windows of houses are carried through the air like dry leaves, and in all directions are seen houses and estates laid ...
— The Story of the Philippines and Our New Possessions, • Murat Halstead

... "Deary me!" said Jimmie, sitting up. "Come, let's get out of this. We must walk her over where she'll hear some music and see some pretty lights or she'll drown herself in her ...
— Abroad with the Jimmies • Lilian Bell

... hammered: pert little shoes piping "Be quick, be quick, we want to be toddling. You seem to have no idea, my good man, how much toddling there is to be done." Dapper boots, sighing: "Oh, please make haste, we are waiting to dance and to strut. Jack walks in the lane, Jill waits by the gate. Oh, deary, how slowly he taps." Stout sober boots, saying: "As soon as you can, old friend. Remember we've work to do." Flat-footed old boots, rusty and limp, mumbling: "We haven't much time, Mr. Chumbley. Just a patch, that is all, we haven't much further to go." And old Joe, still ...
— Paul Kelver • Jerome Klapka, AKA Jerome K. Jerome

... you want to, deary. Right here on Mother Paisley's shoulder. Crying will do you good. It is the Good Lord's way of giving us women an outlet for all our troubles. When the last tear is squeezed out much of the ...
— Ruth Fielding Down East - Or, The Hermit of Beach Plum Point • Alice B. Emerson

... "That sprout, my deary?" said he. "Some such dapper little chamber-fellow, I'll warrant you. A lap-dog, a lady's toy, with a piping voice and an eye for mischief. Yes, he'll be for climbing by Madama Lionella's back-stair. He has the make of it—just ...
— Little Novels of Italy • Maurice Henry Hewlett

... Goshen! a-wrestlin' with Mis' Maxwell! you little snip of a gal! and throwed her! for goodness' sake! deary me! ...
— Cricket at the Seashore • Elizabeth Westyn Timlow

... "Oh deary me!" he exclaimed with an intonation so droll and yet a touch so light and a distress so marked—a confession of helplessness for such a case, in short, so unrelieved—that she at once felt sure she had made the great difference plain. He looked at her with ...
— In the Cage • Henry James

... again. "'Tain't good for you to take on so, deary. Hadn't you better finish beating up the pancakes before ...
— The Backwoodsmen • Charles G. D. Roberts

... you will like it, deary," answered Aunt Peace, looking up with a smile from some pretty trifle she was making with blue silk ...
— Eight Cousins • Louisa M. Alcott

... anywhere, and I have nothing to sadden me, why, I'm not at all sure that I love you enough to pass the balance of the day in your companionship—only that when you are away I desire to know where you are and what you do, and with whom you walk and talk and laugh. Deary me! deary me! I know not what I want, Carus. Let us go to the Blue Fox and drink a ...
— The Reckoning • Robert W. Chambers

... of us have some influence in this big world; and perhaps my little girl can do some good by showing others that a contented heart and a happy face are better ornaments than any Paris can give her. You want a locket, deary; so I send one that my mother gave me years ago. You will find father's face on one side, mine on the other; and when things trouble you, just look at your talisman, and I think the sunshine will come ...
— An Old-fashioned Girl • Louisa May Alcott

... "Deary me, Miss Osgood, it's a pleasure to me to have you here. But I wisht you'd come into the parlor, all of you, you and your friends. I'll lay papers down on the carpet, and ...
— The Wide Awake Girls in Winsted • Katharine Ellis Barrett

... sound the alarum-bell, He sinks beneath the unexpected blow; Before the whiskers of Grimalkin fell, When slumb'ring on her post, the mouse may go,— But woman, wakeful woman, 's never weary, —Above all, when she waits to thump her deary. ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... replied in his chaffy way; "only, you don't pronounce the name right, my son. It should be called 'My-deary,' not 'Madeir-ah.' Hang it ...
— Crown and Anchor - Under the Pen'ant • John Conroy Hutcheson

... Her soft voice scarcely reached the listeners. "But this time there was a good reason." She laughed. "You didn't think it was love, did you, deary?" ...
— The Strange Case of Cavendish • Randall Parrish

... "Deary me!" cried the new teacher, depositing the two littlest ones on the floor, "it's half-past four! We must close school ...
— Virginia of Elk Creek Valley • Mary Ellen Chase

... kitten, my kitten, And hey, my kitten, my deary! Such a sweet pet as this Was neither ...
— The Real Mother Goose • (Illustrated by Blanche Fisher Wright)

... kitten, my kitten, And hey my kitten, my deary, Such a sweet pet as this Was neither far ...
— Traditional Nursery Songs of England - With Pictures by Eminent Modern Artists • Various

... night," he continued; "I do so mostly, and a long walk kills me. Eh, deary me, to think that life should run to such a puddle! And I remember long syne when I was strong, and the blood all hot and good about me, and I loved to run, too—deary me, to run! Well, that's all by. You'd better pray to be took early, Nance, and not live on ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume XXI • Robert Louis Stevenson

... badness in the end," said Mrs. Kane. "It began with goodness, but it ran to badness. Deary me, it's often the same with myself. I think I'm so right that I can't go wrong. But all comes straight again when we're ...
— Hetty Gray - Nobody's Bairn • Rosa Mulholland

... them. Treason is paid high, but the traitor sometimes hangs higher still. Yes, yes, Mr Vanslyperken, we shall see—we are evidence, Mr Vanslyperken—and I'll not be married before I see you well hanged, Mr Vanslyperken. Deary me, Babette," exclaimed the widow, altering her tone, "I wonder how the corporal is: poor dear man, to be ruled by such a traitorous ...
— Snarleyyow • Captain Frederick Marryat

... "T' mystery shall be cleared up. Deary me! An' to think 'at I've walked past yon theer pit many a dozen times within this last few o' months, and nivver dreamed 'at theer wor owt in it but watter! Howivver, gentlemen, ye can put yer minds at ease—we'll ...
— The Talleyrand Maxim • J. S. Fletcher

... "There, deary, that is a lunch to eat whilst you're in the woods; crisp air makes a body hungry. Moses'll show you where the spring is, and there's a gourd dipper hangs by it to drink out of. But take dreadful care the basket. It was your ...
— The Brass Bound Box • Evelyn Raymond

... the onlookers that every one was wondering how she would take those allusions to herself and her good-natured husband; and she was not going to let the Fishmarket have a day's fun at her expense. "Close your mouth, deary, before you slip and fall into it! Don't be bitter! You can't have all the men there are. You're envious!" "Me, envious!" Rosario retorted. "Envious of your reputation, I suppose,—the best in the Cabanal, as even the lamp-post ...
— Mayflower (Flor de mayo) • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... excuse me, dear," the old lady said apologetically, waking with a start; "I'm not very well, and, deary, I woke unusually early this morning, and have been stirring ...
— Elsie's Girlhood • Martha Finley

... alive. Deary me! deary me! Although he always had a sort of spite at me for being as I am," ...
— Two Little Travellers - A Story for Girls • Frances Browne Arthur

... "Deary me!" said Mrs. Purdy, "Dan's quite right. We can't allow a nice little girl like you to work in a glass factory! We must find some nice genteel place for you. Let ...
— Calvary Alley • Alice Hegan Rice

... though I don't like the prospect of it very much. I haven't been there for years, but I'd ought to look after my property there once in a while. Deary me! it seems as if we weren't ever going to have ...
— Timothy's Quest - A Story for Anybody, Young or Old, Who Cares to Read It • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... gave him a scornful cast of her eye. Her face was flushed, and with her crimsoned mouth and shining eyes she was for the moment beautiful. "I got my pride. I told him the truth at first, and when he wouldn't believe me—'Oh, no, there must be someone'—I says to myself, 'All right, deary, have it your own way,' and I jolly him along now," she laughed with joyous memory. "I got ...
— Treasure and Trouble Therewith - A Tale of California • Geraldine Bonner

... I dreamed I'd ever be tellin' ye this, an auld, lanely, rudas wife! Weel, Mr. Erchie, there was a lad cam' courtin' me, as was but naetural. Mony had come before, and I would nane o' them. But this yin had a tongue to wile the birds frae the lift and the bees frae the foxglove bells. Deary me, but it's lang syne. Folk have dee'd sinsyne and been buried, and are forgotten, and bairns been born and got merrit and got bairns o' their ain. Sinsyne woods have been plantit, and have grawn ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. XIX (of 25) - The Ebb-Tide; Weir of Hermiston • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Endicott slowly opened her eyes. They swept the room wildly and fixed upon Jennie's face with a look of horror. "There, deary, you're all right now," Jennie patted her cheek reassuringly: "You're all right," she repeated. "Don't you remember me—Jennie Dodds, that was? ...
— Prairie Flowers • James B. Hendryx

... tries any of his games on you, Ernestine will look after you." She took his head between her two hands and kissed his forehead affectionately, ignoring Mealy Benoit's angry protests. "He's a dear little chap: I like him," she said to the company at large. "What's your name, deary?" ...
— Fantomas • Pierre Souvestre

... sewe of rokeby and the freeres of Richmond. Arthur o'Bradley's wedding. The painful plough. The useful plow; or, the plough's praise. The farmer's son. The farmer's boy. Richard of Taunton Dean; or, dumble dum deary. Wooing song of a yeoman of Kent's sonne. The clown's courtship. Harry's courtship. Harvest-home song. Harvest-home. The mow. The barley-mow song. The barley-mow song. (Suffolk version.) The craven churn-supper song. The rural dance about the may-pole. The Hitchin may-day ...
— Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of England • Robert Bell

... me 'long with you, Dan'l, take me 'long with you and Em'ly! I'll be your servant, constant and trew. If there's slaves in them parts where you're a-going, I'll be bound to you for one, and happy, but doen't ye leave me behind, Dan'l, that's a deary dear!' ...
— David Copperfield • Charles Dickens

... though he was known to many of the people, as he drove away from the town into the heart of the lonely and desolate land. The wind had so far died down, and the rain had considerably lessened, but the gloom of the sky was deepened by the drawing on of the afternoon, and lay heavily over the deary wastes of moor and hill. What a wild and dismal country was this which lay before and all around him, now that the last traces of human occupation were passed! There was not a cottage, not a stone wall, not a fence, to break the monotony of the long ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 11, No. 24, March, 1873 • Various

... my baby, deary; Mother will never be weary, Frolic and play now while you may, So dance, my ...
— Rhymes Old and New • M.E.S. Wright

... trumpet-flower glided the train, And I thought (for a dimness crept over my brain, And I tucked my head under my wing), 'Deary me! What a sight for a plain ...
— Voices for the Speechless • Abraham Firth

... "Eh deary me!" cries Cousin Bess. "Why, I ne'er counted one of our lasses old enough to be wed. How doth ...
— Joyce Morrell's Harvest - The Annals of Selwick Hall • Emily Sarah Holt

... he wants you to get well. You owe it to him and your father to get well—as well as your great and lifelong sorrow permits. Now, deary, take a little more stimulant, and then don't talk. I've explained everything, and shown you your duty; and I know that my ...
— His Sombre Rivals • E. P. Roe

... clear out o' this kitchen," snapped Eliza. "Out with ye! You too, Phin Striker. I'll call ye when the table's set. Now, you go an' set over there in the corner, away from the window, deary, where the lightnin' can't git at you, an'—You'll find a comb on the mantel-piece, Mr. Gwynne, an' Phineas will git you a boot-jack out o' the bedroom if that darkey is too weak to pull your boots off for you. Don't any of you go trampin' all ...
— Viola Gwyn • George Barr McCutcheon

... It is not the time. Seven days, and seven hours, and seven minutes will hear the striking of the moment. Sarishan, my deary." ...
— Red Money • Fergus Hume

... most forgot to say 'twas a girl posy,—"deary me, what a humly, skimpy, awk'ard thing I be! I ain't more 'n half made; there ain't no nice, pretty lining inside o' me, like them other posies; and on'y my wrong side shows, and that's jest plain ...
— Story-Tell Lib • Annie Trumbull Slosson

... all this way for nothing," she went on, her form heaving and falling in quick pants, her face flushed, her full red lips parted, and a fine dew of perspiration on her skin. "Well—why don't you speak, deary?" ...
— Jude the Obscure • Thomas Hardy

... "Deary me, I don't like this at all," cried Mrs Beazeley, getting up, and wiping her apron with a quick motion. "Oh, Jacob, that must be—not ...
— Jacob Faithful • Captain Frederick Marryat

... will, deary, according to what this gentleman advises; but, out of precaution, I will give you the twenty thousand francs in gold which I have in the wainscoting of the recess of my room, and two bills payable to bearer which are due to me, one from Mr. Damon, ...
— The Imaginary Invalid - Le Malade Imaginaire • Moliere

... have thanked him, deary," said Aunt Alvirah, sweetly. "And I do thank him, same as I do our Father in Heaven, ev'ry day of my life, for takin' me away from that poorfarm an' makin' an independent woman of me a'gin. Oh, Jabez ain't all bad. Fur from it, ...
— Ruth Fielding in Moving Pictures - Or Helping The Dormitory Fund • Alice Emerson

... hear anything up there. They're thinking about the last pot of porter they had, or the next they're to get. Deary me, I am so glad! Of course ...
— The Last Chronicle of Barset • Anthony Trollope

... cried Mrs. Tozer, "deary, deary me! I'm very sorry, poor gentleman, I hope it ain't anything serious. Though he's a church parson, he's a very civil-spoken man, and I see his children drag him into his own house one day as me and Tozer was passing. I ...
— Phoebe, Junior • Mrs [Margaret] Oliphant

... "Deary me," said mother, as he set a chair for her very polite, but she would not sit upon it; "Saturday morning I was a wife, sir; and Saturday night I was a widow, and my children fatherless. My husband's name was John Ridd, sir, as everybody ...
— Lorna Doone - A Romance of Exmoor • R. D. Blackmore

... you yet, Mrs. Cox? And one of 'em not over strong? Deary me! that makes it hard for you and the young gal But you be standing it remarkable well. And gentlemen born you say! They do say that the other one wi' the specked skin be making fools of Miss Maria up at the Rectory and old Miss Dexter at the cottage. Well! well! Poor Miss Ellen was gone ...
— Crowded Out! and Other Sketches • Susie F. Harrison

... same you used to be—pushee here and pushee there, in bad pets—it was all me—breaky heart of poor Missis—she comee over great seas; thinkee see you all good and pretty as Englis lady; and den you be shocking figure, all cover with spotee—oh deary! oh deary! perhaps come fever, then you go to the death, you will be bury in dark hole, and mamma ...
— The Barbadoes Girl - A Tale for Young People • Mrs. Hofland

... "Ah, deary me, it's such a world! Don't you think, dear, that we have had enough domestic notoriety ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... if you please. Why, then, deary—we didn't like anyone to intrude on our society; do you take the hint? as the gamblers have it. Come along, Alice—Mrs. Knickerbocker, I would say—let us leave the lovers ...
— Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911: Rip van - Winkle • Charles Burke

... "Eh, deary me! What I had to thole that day! I was flaid that if he had a drop too mich he'd happen lose his footing on the plank-bridge at the town-end, and then the spate would tak him off his feet and drown him. I offered to walk wi' him down to the public and bide ...
— More Tales of the Ridings • Frederic Moorman

... a door and there was Mr. Boffin beaming and Mrs. Boffin shedding tears of joy, and folding her to her breast as she said: "My deary, deary, deary, wife of John and mother of his little child! My loving loving, bright bright, pretty pretty! Welcome to your house and ...
— Tales from Dickens • Charles Dickens and Hallie Erminie Rives

... is to give me a lift as far as Brigslade, and then I can walk the rest," said the sturdy old woman, "so good-day to you, ma'am, and, oh deary me, but I do hope there may be better news to hear when I come back on Friday," and with a cordial shake of the hand from Grandmamma, Barbara turned to go. But just then there came at the door a whining and scratching which made the old lady give ...
— "Us" - An Old Fashioned Story • Mary Louisa S. Molesworth

... mind, dear, I think I'll sleep with you." After a moment of deep reflection she added plaintively: "There is so much that I just have to tell you, deary. ...
— The Husbands of Edith • George Barr McCutcheon

... on the sill: "Shut your eyes, deary, and sleep in a trice, Then I will stay here, and scare off the mice,— ...
— The Nursery, January 1877, Volume XXI, No. 1 - A Monthly Magazine for Youngest Readers • Various

... No longer Deary, Ducky, and Love, I soon came down to simple "M!" The very servants cross'd my wish, My Susan let me down to them. The poker hardly seem'd my own, I might as well have been a log— What d'ye think of that, my Cat? What d'ye ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... "Deary-me! She's very young; but all the young gells are doin' something these days. I've got a niece in munitions-makin' a pretty penny she is. I've been meanin' to tell you—I don't come to church now; since my ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... "Why, deary, it's just a day to spend with God and get to enjoy His company," she said. "Let me read you this verse in Isaiah: 'Blessed'—that means, 'O the happiness of': I'll read it so—'O the happiness of the ...
— Cloudy Jewel • Grace Livingston Hill

... guarded in his expressions than I am. How it should have come to pass that I was so stirred I can hardly tell. But Miss Thoroughbung had said certain words which had moved me very much." She had called him "Peter" and "deary," and had spoken of him as "keeping company" with her. All these disgusting terms of endearment he could not repeat to his brother-in-law, but felt it necessary to ...
— Mr. Scarborough's Family • Anthony Trollope

... rent, she would not take it, but accompanied them to the little gate with many tears, receiving charge of a farewell letter to the rector. "And haven't you one to leave me for the curate?" she inquired. "Deary me! but I'm sure for every once the old gentleman came when Miss Bond was so bad, the curate came three times; and no letter for him! ...
— Turns of Fortune - And Other Tales • Mrs. S. C. Hall

... waddled, and they waddled on and on, Till one remarked, "oh! deary me, where is the river gone? We asked the Ancient Gander, and he said 'twas very near, He must have been deceiving us, ...
— Five Mice in a Mouse-trap - by the Man in the Moon. • Laura E. Richards

... them flowers out of the garden?" said Mrs. Stokes. "Sakes alive! there's plenty there. And they're just the kind I've seen city folks going crazy over. Some of the hotel folks were up here last summer, and deary me! but they did make a to-do over my larkspur, sweet-william, china pinks, candytuft, cockscomb, and such. You just give the ladies some of 'em, and they'll be pleased enough; for there's hardly any flowers in Riseborough—too ...
— A Missionary Twig • Emma L. Burnett

... her thoughts had been very troubled ones on the same subject. She had lived alone for so many years now, and as she said, she was so little accustomed to children, she was afraid that her young nephew would find her home deary and sad; that she might not understand him herself, or that she might be foolishly indulgent and blind to the faults, which might make him grow useless and miserable. She had spent many anxious hours thinking ...
— Left at Home - or, The Heart's Resting Place • Mary L. Code

... "Deary me, the saints preserve and defend us!" she cried. "I must do all in my poor weak woman's power to tempt you as best I may. Draw up, lads, for here it comes!" she announced without ceremony, and the three watching her needed ...
— Mr. Wicker's Window • Carley Dawson

... patient being worried by his official nurse, a farm-labourer's wife, a bundle of a woman, whose lumbering assiduities he fenced with reiterated humourous negatives to every one of her propositions, until she prefaced the last two or three of the list with a 'Deary me!' addressed consolatorily to herself. She went through the same forms each day, at the usual hours of the day, and Jane, though she would have felt the apathetic doltishness of the woman less, felt how hard it must be for him ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... diddleums, Golly, is! We all miss you so much, deary, though we don't miss so many little things as when you were here. My dear, conscientious, unselfish little girl! You don't say where John Gale is. Is he still protecting you—he-he!—you giddy, naughty thing! People wonder on the island why I let you go alone to London—they ...
— New Burlesques • Bret Harte

... goes on, as she chronically complains. 'Poor me, poor me, my head is so bad. Them two come in after ye. Ah, poor me, the business is slack, is slack! Few Chinamen about the Docks, and fewer Lascars, and no ships coming in, these say! Here's another ready for ye, deary. Ye'll remember like a good soul, won't ye, that the market price is dreffle high just now? More nor three shillings and sixpence for a thimbleful! And ye'll remember that nobody but me (and Jack Chinaman t'other side the court; but he can't ...
— The Mystery of Edwin Drood • Charles Dickens

... and the river there is all good Grunewald water, every drop of it. Yes, sir, a fine state. A man of Grunewald now will swing me an axe over his head that many a man of Gerolstein could hardly lift; and the pines, why, deary me, there must be more pines in that little state, sir, than people in this whole big world. 'Tis twenty years now since I crossed the marshes, for we grow home-keepers in old age; but I mind it as if it was yesterday. Up and down, the road keeps right ...
— Prince Otto • Robert Louis Stevenson

... soft, kind heart, Master Frank; so you had. God's blessing on you! What a fine man you have grown! Deary me! Well, it seems as though it were only just t'other day like." And she pushed him a little off from her, so that she might look ...
— Doctor Thorne • Anthony Trollope

... steps were getting heavier. One day in December, the snow began to fall. Late in the afternoon I saw Antonia driving her cattle homeward across the hill. The snow was flying round her and she bent to face it, looking more lonesome-like to me than usual. "Deary me," I says to myself, "the girl's stayed out too late. It'll be dark before she gets them cattle put into the corral." I seemed to sense she'd been feeling too miserable to get ...
— My Antonia • Willa Cather

... "Ah, deary me, gentlemen," she cried; "it's sore work, that it is! I'm sure if they only knew what I do they'd behave better to you. Them trades is doing ...
— Patience Wins - War in the Works • George Manville Fenn

... rascal, and I'll do it, whether I have or no! No right, marry come up! Where else is he to hear it, prithee? You talk of forgiving him, forsooth, and Alice never stands up to him an inch, and as for that Tom o' mine, why, he can scarce look his own cat in the face. Deary weary me! where would you all be, I'd like to know, without I looked after you? You'd let yourselves be trod on and ground down into the dust, afore you'd do so much as squeal. That's not my way o' going on, ...
— All's Well - Alice's Victory • Emily Sarah Holt

... "Don't cry, then, deary, and I'll take you to mammy," said the woman. She looked quickly up the alley, no one in sight. No one in the crowded street noticed her. She stooped, raised the child in her arms, wrapped a shawl round her, and walked swiftly away. And that evening, when ...
— A Pair of Clogs • Amy Walton

... Come up, ould girl—just a taste of the whip, Billiam! Do her no harm at all. Bishop's Court! Deary me, the ould house is in the same ...
— Capt'n Davy's Honeymoon - 1893 • Hall Caine

... "Deary me! deary me!" said the king, "has Jack Frost gone to bother Mother Nature? I meant he should wait for me this year. But something must be done. Ho! Snowflake, come here, and bring your sisters and ...
— Buttercup Gold and Other Stories • Ellen Robena Field

... about down or up? It makes no difference, as he's gone. If he had lived one might have cared about being up, as you call it. Eh, deary; I'll be going after him before long, and it will ...
— Framley Parsonage • Anthony Trollope

... bad, so it is," she continued in the same soothing, winning way, caressing his brow with her tiny hands. "It's a horrid shame, so it is! P-o-o-r pa. Where does it ache, papa-sy, dear? In the forehead? Cerebrum or cerebellum, papa-sy? Occiput or sinciput, deary?" ...
— Little Classics, Volume 8 (of 18) - Mystery • Various

... now play your part! Gin ye be the steed that wins my deary, Wi' corn and hay ye'se be fed for aye, And never spur sall make ...
— A Collection of Ballads • Andrew Lang

... "I don't believe in slang," he added, as if to fortify himself against a conviction. "You needn't go, deary. ...
— Mr. Bingle • George Barr McCutcheon

... have duty to-day, both morning and afternoon, and to preach twice, I have only time to scrawl a few lines to you between the services. I will write to my deary to-morrow. ...
— The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol. I. - With A Supplement Of Interesting Letters By Distinguished Characters • Horatio Nelson



Words linked to "Deary" :   teacher's pet, macushla, chosen, mollycoddle, lover



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