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Dearie   Listen
Dearie

noun
1.
A special loved one.  Synonyms: darling, deary, ducky, favorite, favourite, pet.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Dearie" Quotes from Famous Books



... said, and the parents would surely make a search for it and pay any one well for looking after it, so Jerome said he'd take it. Just at that time I had a baby the same age. So I was well able to feed both you two mites. There, dearie, that was how I came ...
— Nobody's Boy - Sans Famille • Hector Malot

... "Well, dearie," returned her mother, "the sooner you are dressed the sooner the secret will come. See, I am nearly ready ...
— A Sweet Little Maid • Amy E. Blanchard

... "He's a man, dearie, and a good one. He may be untrammeled by convention, but he is clean and brave. He has eyes that look through cowardice and treachery, fine strong eyes that are honest ...
— A Texas Ranger • William MacLeod Raine

... brought me some, and I ran off into the berth to write it, hoping that I should be there undisturbed. I had great difficulty in penning the letter; and while I was kneeling down at the chest, old Growles came in and mocked at me, and another fellow asked me whether I was sending a love-letter to my dearie, and a third gave me a knock on the elbow, which spattered the ink over the paper and nearly upset the ink-bottle. Still I ...
— Dick Cheveley - His Adventures and Misadventures • W. H. G. Kingston

... "Dearie me; you'll pardon me saying so, but your nails are in a perfectly turrible state. I don't think I've seen a jumpman's nails in such a state for ever so long. Pardon me again—but how long has it been since ...
— Cobb's Anatomy • Irvin S. Cobb

... let us wander Where Raven's streams meander, And where, in simple grandeur, The daisy decks the plain. Peace and joy our hours shall measure; Come, oh! come, my soul's best treasure! Then how sweet, and then how cheerie, Raven's braes will be, my dearie. ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume III - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... dearie," said Charles-Norton, and hung up the receiver, and with a bad conscience and a soaring heart, went off to dinner. No shearing to-night—gee! He ordered a dinner which made the red-headed waitress gasp. "Must have got ...
— The Trimming of Goosie • James Hopper

... "'Dearie mother, we don't cough so mush' (how do you spell cough, Miss Bibby? There's a horrid g or q in it somewhere, I know)—'I don't smudg so mush.' I wish (Oh, dear, you said we oughtn't to say we wished she'd come back, didn't you, Miss Bibby, cause she might stop enjoying ...
— In the Mist of the Mountains • Ethel Turner

... there, cry your heart out," she exclaimed. "You 'a' lost your situation. Well, you aint the first; you'll soon get another, dearie, and you'll be a rare bit of comfort to me at home for a few days. There, set down close to me, darlin', and tell me everythink. Wot's up, ...
— Good Luck • L. T. Meade

... neither, dearie? Come now, think if you picked it up and threw it in the fire. I won't be angry if you tell ...
— Little Folks (July 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... sit in the churchyard weeping? Why do you cling to the dear old graves, When the dim, drear mists of the dusk are creeping Out of the marshes in wan, white waves? Darling, I know you're a slave to sorrow; Dearie, I know that the world is cruel; But you'll be in bed with a cold to-morrow, I shall ...
— Rhymes of the East and Re-collected Verses • John Kendall (AKA Dum-Dum)

... story—you can't get money out of the kind she goes with, that way. She takes the other tack. She whispers to them, and laughs with them, and fondles them, and makes them love her, and when they love her she says: 'But dearie, be reasonable! Think how many people love me! I like to have you here, you fat old darling with the gold jingling in your pockets! but I can't let you sit with me unless you pay. Yes, I'm expensive, I admit. But don't you love this scent I wear? Don't ...
— American Adventures - A Second Trip 'Abroad at home' • Julian Street

... be over to the kindergarten with the Sisters, an' I thought I'd clane go out of me mind if I couldn't have a word wid you before Jim gets home—Och, Aileen, dearie, me home I'm so proud of—" She choked, and Billy immediately repudiated his gumdrop upon Aileen's clean linen skirt; his eyes were reading the signs of the times ...
— Flamsted quarries • Mary E. Waller

... did, dearie; so don't worry. I'll get all the spots taken out, and all the things mended, and ...
— Pink and White Tyranny - A Society Novel • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... trusted him first off. He's a church member, an' that's somethin'. They ain't all spiritual, but they're mostly clean an' just an' kindly, when they're anythin' at all but just plain hypocrites, which, thank the Lord, there ain't so many as some would have us believe. Now wash your face, dearie, an' run back to your place so you can come home early, for we're goin' to have the old hen with dumplin's ...
— Exit Betty • Grace Livingston Hill

... happy man. The atmosphere of the dinner table chilled him a little, but for once the subject on which he was always hoping and fearing did not enter his mind. When Mary left the room, he said cheerfully, "We will be with you anon, dearie, and then you shall sing for us, 'The Lass O' Gowrie,'" and he began to hum the pretty melody as he poured out for himself another glass of port. "Help yourself, Allan. You do not seem ...
— A Daughter of Fife • Amelia Edith Barr

... sings a bonny lay above the Scottish heather; It sprinkles down from far away like light and love together; He drops the golden notes to greet his brooding mate, his dearie; I only know one song more sweet,—the vespers ...
— The Poems of Henry Van Dyke • Henry Van Dyke

... grandmother gave her a quick look. "Never mind, dearie," she said, "just remember that you are a gentlewoman by birth, and try to be sweet and loving, and ...
— Judy • Temple Bailey

... your house and mine, dearie," the young man said, and then looked down at her to see why ...
— The Wind Before the Dawn • Dell H. Munger

... "Sure, dearie. As I say, don't never git your ear full of other folks's troubles—and secrets." She went out, with a backward look at once crafty ...
— Apron-Strings • Eleanor Gates

... never produced an orator; no, dearie, they never have, and never can. You might as well have a school for poets, or a college for saints, or give medals for proficiency in the gentle art of wooing, as to expect to make ...
— Little Journeys To the Homes of the Great, Volume 3 (of 14) • Elbert Hubbard

... it further, dearie. It is not a matter of such importance that we should differ to the point of becoming acrimonious. Besides, it's a ...
— Kindred of the Dust • Peter B. Kyne

... be married, dearie? Now that's too bad. Ain't he any kind of relation to you? Not an uncle ...
— The Girl from Montana • Grace Livingston Hill

... in the gloaming, nae swankies are roaming 'Bout stacks wi' the lasses at bogle to play; But ilk ane sits eerie, lamenting her dearie— The Flowers of the Forest are a' ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... Don't try to. Please don't see it! Just let me go on helping you. That's all I ask. (she draws MADELINE to her) Ah, dearie, I held you when you were a little baby without your mother. All those years count for something, Madeline. There's just nothing to life if years of love don't count for something. (listening) ...
— Plays • Susan Glaspell

... arrant nonsense. What do you know about engagements and—and disappointments, and dreams what proves but early mists of the morning? what do you know of fickleness and broken promises? There, child, you won't get any of that bad sort of knowledge out of me. Now you run away, dearie. There's someone been talking about what they oughtn't to, and you has no call to listen, my pet. There's some weddings happy, and there's some that aint, and that's all I can say. Run away ...
— A Young Mutineer • Mrs. L. T. Meade

... Nan! Drat it, don't look like that! I meant nothing, dearie; only I'm a heap surprised. Chuck is a good fellow, I'll admit; but I've been dreaming of your marrying a prince or an ambassador, and Henderson comes like a jolt. Besides, Chuck will never be anything but a first-rate politician. You'll have to get used to cheap cigars and four-ply whisky. When ...
— The Man on the Box • Harold MacGrath

... enough when they was here, because things were so uncomfortable; but now——. I wish something could be done, my lord." Lord George could only assure her that it was out of his power to do anything. He had no control over his brother, and did not even mean to come and see him again. "Dearie me!" said Mrs. Walker; "he's a very owdacious nobleman, I ...
— Is He Popenjoy? • Anthony Trollope

... "Well, dearie," said her mother, "here's an invitation for you from the Kips. Dorothy will celebrate her fifteenth birthday on Saturday with a luncheon ...
— How Ethel Hollister Became a Campfire Girl • Irene Elliott Benson

... "Yes, dearie, I did forget it," replied the husband. "Isn't it natural that I should? There isn't really anything about you to remind me that you are a day older than you ...
— Good Stories from The Ladies Home Journal • Various

... she had but now handed a note to a young man who had hurried out to open it beneath the gaslight in the vestibule, where he had grown slightly pale on reading the classic phrase—how often had others read it in that very place!—"Impossible tonight, my dearie! I'm booked!" La Faloise sat on one of these chairs at the back of the room, between the table and the stove. He seemed bent on passing the evening there, and yet he was not quite happy. Indeed, he kept tucking up his long legs in his endeavors to escape from a whole litter of black ...
— Nana, The Miller's Daughter, Captain Burle, Death of Olivier Becaille • Emile Zola

... Without your presence. Selfish, I'm afraid You'll think your Helen. But I love you so, How can I be quite willing you should go? Come Christmas Eve, or earlier. Let me know, And I will meet you, dearie! at the train. Your happy, ...
— Maurine and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... you can't help, dearie. Just wake up and be the brightest, happiest, sweetest thing you know how to be, and the world will-be that ...
— Happiness and Marriage • Elizabeth (Jones) Towne

... exuberance, "any little thing. We all do it. Only be careful you don't make that architect of yours jealous," she teased. "Think up a classy confession, something weird—understand? Don't look so darned serious. It's only for fun. You can fake up something, dearie, if you're afraid to tell the truth. Why, ...
— Possessed • Cleveland Moffett

... "Eh, dearie me, now! to think of that!" said the old woman, sympathisingly. "And you were hurt a great deal, ...
— Daybreak - A Story for Girls • Florence A. Sitwell

... you can, dearie!" he protested in a soothing tone. "But these shyster lawyers who hang around those places—you 'member Jim O'Leary out home to Athens? Well, they don't know a lady when they see one, and they wouldn't care if they did; and they'll try and pry into ...
— By Advice of Counsel • Arthur Train

... sign whatever," he says. He's taken a rouble for it. "Can't sell it for less," he says. Because it's no easy matter to get 'em, you know. I paid him, dearie, out of my own money. If she takes them, thinks I, it's all right; if she don't, I can let old Michael's ...
— Redemption and Two Other Plays • Leo Tolstoy et al

... it is!" said Mother Bridget, gazing with admiration at Diana. "Why, now, she is a fine little child. I'm sure, dearie, I don't mind whether you call me ugly or not; it don't matter the least bit in the world to me. And how old may ...
— A Little Mother to the Others • L. T. Meade

... your way, Granny," she said; and the old lady, as she walked with her to the door, answered, "I have had my way for nearly eighty years, dearie, and I've found it a very good way. I'm not likely to change ...
— The Man Between • Amelia E. Barr

... I've been, for didn't Lord Edward send me word to look to the young leddy? Come away, honey; for you look as white as the painted angel beyant there. So they sneaked you away, did they? And all because his honour was hanging the boys. Never ye fear, dearie, you'll be safe with old Biddy, even if the whole of the United Irishmen come after you.—And you, Barry, you're welcome too, though your father Mike wouldn't let me be mother to you. Dear, oh. There's many changes to us all ...
— Kilgorman - A Story of Ireland in 1798 • Talbot Baines Reed

... Phoebe exclaimed, briskly, stepping to a high, carved wardrobe beside her bed, "this merry-making habit wearies me. Let us don a fitter attire. Come—lend a hand, dearie—be quick!" ...
— The Panchronicon • Harold Steele Mackaye

... is a brute. Rouse him yourself, and tell him to come inside the tent. Poor boy, he's half drowned. Come, dearie," to the girl, "go into the dressing-room. ...
— The Rose in the Ring • George Barr McCutcheon

... thirty-five families that my school ought to draw from," she began. "Six years ago when I took this school some of them surely did need help. Dearie me! The things they didn't know about comfort and decency would fix up a whole neighborhood for life. They wore stockings till they dropped off. Some of the girls put on sweaters in October, wore them till Christmas, washed them, and then wore them till spring. You never saw such utterly wretched ...
— The New Education - A Review of Progressive Educational Movements of the Day (1915) • Scott Nearing

... dearie! What could we two do for ourselves? And I'm loth to part you and Gavin. I simply cannot take the sacrifice, you so lovingly offer me. I will write to my brother David. Gavin isna far wrong there; David is a very close man, but he willna ...
— Winter Evening Tales • Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

... the Lamp, or a freed dryad, or something fairy-taley or mythological," she declared. "It was worth it, though, to see those girls' faces. Thank you, Giovanni! I'm ever so much obliged. Sorry if I've spoilt your bed of violets. Is that Delia calling us? Coming, dearie. Where are the rest of the Camellia Buds? I may as well tell my story to the whole bunch of you together. Then you'll see the sort of thing we're up against. They've taken our idea, and they're trying to beat us on our own ground. That's what it's ...
— The Jolliest School of All • Angela Brazil

... down the teapot and rose to get a spoon from the cupboard. With her back to the room she said: "The what-not? Why, you see, dearie, living here all alone by myself it only made one more thing to dust; ...
— Bunner Sisters • Edith Wharton

... to Mary Bell's tea, dearie, and I wanted just to look in at the Athenaeum—" Mrs. Salisbury began, a little inconsequently. "How soon do you expect to be home?" ...
— The Treasure • Kathleen Norris

... Mother said, 'Of course, dearie,' and Anthea started swimming through a sea of x's and y's and z's. Mother was sitting at the mahogany bureau ...
— The Phoenix and the Carpet • E. Nesbit

... no security, and you know, dearie, what that will mean for me if papa cannot meet them. Oh, how I detest ...
— Tarzan of the Apes • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... rose, and looked over my head at Firm. "My own granddarter, if such there had been, could not have done more to comfort me, nor half so much, for aught I know. There is no picking and choosing among the females, as God gives them. But he has given you for a blessing and saving to my old age, my dearie." ...
— Erema - My Father's Sin • R. D. Blackmore

... offer with avidity, and talking more in the Romany manner. "I allers did say as you were what I said before you were, and that's golden, my Gorgious one. Ahime!" she blew a wreath of blue smoke from her withered lips, "that's food to me, my dearie, and heat to ...
— Red Money • Fergus Hume

... bleak shore of a charity ward was harmless. He absolved her of all evil intent, of any desire to obtain anything under false pretenses. He even absolved the blonde person, who despite her brassy hair, her hectic face, had of a sudden become a kind, gentle, and soothing presence. "Well, dearie, you got a straight tip from that feller. All I had to do was to show that piece o' paper he give you, and this kind gent'man come right off to see you," said the blonde cheerfully. "An' now maybe he'll be wantin' to talk with you, so I'll leave you be. ...
— The Purple Heights • Marie Conway Oemler

... brimful of life, seemed almost vulgar beside such remote tranquillity, while she was telling Barbara that a little bunch of heather in the better half of a soap-dish on the window-sill had come from Wales, because, as she explained: "My mother was born in Stirling, dearie; so I likes a bit of heather, though I never been out o' Bethnal ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... the yowes tae the knowes, Ca' them where the heather grows, Ca' them where the burnie rows, My kind dearie, O! ...
— The Underworld - The Story of Robert Sinclair, Miner • James C. Welsh

... THAT one. But, dearie," Mrs. Schofield explained, "I got to thinking about it after I went to bed, and I decided you'd ...
— Penrod and Sam • Booth Tarkington

... dearie, Will I, will I, Sail the sounding sea, dearie, Will I, will I, 'Neath the starred or starless sky, Heaven is where the heart beats high, With a love that cannot die; So we wander, you ...
— Soldier Songs and Love Songs • A.H. Laidlaw

... Grange, trance and test clairvoyant, to Hattie, the landlady's daughter. "Now keep your wish in your mind, remember. That's right; a deep cut for luck. U-um. The nine of hearts is your wish—and right beside it is the ace of hearts. That means your home, dearie—the spirits don't lie, even when they're manifestin' themselves just through cards. They guide your hand when you shuffle and cut. Your wish is about ...
— The House of Mystery • William Henry Irwin

... in Immering lay back behind a garden full of wallflowers, and was kept by a very fat and very cheerful little woman, who insisted on regarding them as brother and sister, and calling them both "dearie." These points conceded she gave them an admirable tea of astonishing cheapness. Lewisham did not like the second condition very much, because it seemed to touch a little on his latest enterprise. But the tea and the bread and butter and the whort jam were ...
— Love and Mr. Lewisham • H. G. Wells

... tell even you, dearie, just now," Ruth said, with sudden seriousness. "But you shall know about it before ...
— Ruth Fielding in Moving Pictures - Or Helping The Dormitory Fund • Alice Emerson

... but old Bill entertained but one sentiment for her,—that of unqualified admiration. As we only 'wrought' at the stranded schooner on the high water,—some five hours out of the twenty-four,—he had plenty of opportunity to dangle after his dearie, and did so unremittingly. While the rest of us were either napping, dancing the lively 'straight four,' hunting herns' eggs among the sand-hills, and so on, according to our inclination, he, in far more romantic mood, seized all ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. I., No. IV., April, 1862 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... dearie," mumbled Lady Sarah Gruntham, who insisted on keeping Lancashire meal hours to the consternation of the hotel staff, native and otherwise, as she mopped her heated brow with her handkerchief and with the other ...
— Desert Love • Joan Conquest

... a bit of a load on and that's why I'm kind of hoarse, you might call it. I left half my gullet down Guadalajara way, and I've been spitting the other half out all the way up here. Oh well, who cares? But I want you to have that money, see, dearie? Hey, Sergeant, where's my bottle? Now, little girl, come here and pour yourself a drink. You won't, eh? Aw, come on! Afraid of your—er—husband ... or whatever he is, huh? Well, if he's skulking in some ...
— The Underdogs • Mariano Azuela

... not want to use them, dearie, but it is part of your education to learn to spell them. Come, now, I'll help you, and we'll soon put them through. Let's pick out the very hardest ...
— Marjorie's Busy Days • Carolyn Wells

... the lint-white locks, Bonnie lassie! artless lassie! Will ye wi' me tent the flocks, Will ye be my dearie, O?" ...
— John Ward, Preacher • Margaret Deland

... my appearance, Mr. Hooper," she smirked. "I was getting some flowers for the table, dearie," ...
— Stubble • George Looms

... a Wife who gave the Money-Getter a Vacation by going into the Country for a Month. Dearie took her to the Train, and all the way she kept saying that it did not seem just Right to romp away on a Pleasure Trip and ...
— People You Know • George Ade

... she said. "Did you get homesick, dearie? Welcome. Wish I could kiss you, Honey, but I can't. I've just finished my lips. Why didn't you telegraph, Rascal? It's a shame not to ...
— The Fifth Wheel - A Novel • Olive Higgins Prouty

... you one piece of advice, dearie," said she, the night before the ceremony. Mary, wrapped in all the mysterious thoughts of that unreal time, winced inwardly. This was all so new, so sacred, so inexpressible to her that she felt Mamma couldn't understand ...
— Poor, Dear Margaret Kirby and Other Stories • Kathleen Norris

... you, dearie," said the old woman, looking gratefully from one bright face to the other. "I suppose you don't know how much I appreciate all you've done for me," she added, her voice breaking a little, "'cause I never could tell you if I lived ...
— The Outdoor Girls at the Hostess House • Laura Lee Hope

... Just look! Six one-thousand-dollar bills, fifty one-hundreds—that's eleven thousand! A sheaf of fifties and twenties, swelling the total to something like twelve thousand! Hoo-ray! Again I ask, am I dreaming? Pinch me, I'll stop snoring, 'deed I will. I'll turn over, dearie, and go to sleep again! Twelve thousand plunks! Wouldn't that everlastingly unsettle you? Well, well, well! Not so bad for a moment's effort before breakfast, eh? Ain't it simply grand, Mag? I wonder who and ...
— The Statesmen Snowbound • Robert Fitzgerald

... on the happy days I spent wi' you, my dearie, And now what lands between us lie, How can ...
— A Selection From The Lyrical Poems Of Robert Herrick • Robert Herrick

... formality? He likes you, dear, of course. But a man wants to respect as well as like a pretty girl, and I am afraid—Uncle has noticed it!" she interrupted herself quickly, as Cherry tossed her head scornfully. "He spoke of it last night, and Alix tells me that you are calling Mr. Lloyd 'Martin!' Now, dearie, Martin Lloyd is fully ...
— Sisters • Kathleen Norris

... "My dearie," says Bramble's grandmother, "don't stamp so. The poor old gentleman can't hear his ...
— The Fifth Form at Saint Dominic's - A School Story • Talbot Baines Reed

... "Well, dearie, dearie me, the sight of you is good for tired eyes, Charlotte," she bumbled in her rich, deep old voice. As she spoke she tucked a white wisp of a curl back into place beneath the second water wave that protruded from under the little white widow's ruche in her bonnet and continued to beam ...
— The Heart's Kingdom • Maria Thompson Daviess

... she said matter-of-factly. "Just like I can tell that you're getting ready to screech 'Charlatan!' at me, and like you think I got a cast-iron girdle and homely shoes. Well, they're comfortable, dearie, which is more than you can say for those high-heeled slippers of yours. That left little toe of yours is ...
— Card Trick • Walter Bupp AKA Randall Garrett

... there awa', Wanderin' Willie, Here awa', there awa', haud awa' hame. Come to my bosom, my ain only dearie, O tell me thou bring'st me my ...
— Music: An Art and a Language • Walter Raymond Spalding

... "Dearie me, sir," said Mrs Gabbon, "I'm sorry to 'ear that; you that looks so 'ealthy too! Well, one never knows what's be'ind a 'appy ...
— The Lunatic at Large • J. Storer Clouston

... place at one of the smaller tables and dabbled through a series of uninteresting dishes. An admiring waitress rebuked her ... "Dearie, you ...
— Erik Dorn • Ben Hecht

... "Good luck, dearie, and cheer up!" she cried, seeing the look in the sad blue eyes. "School teaching's heaps of fun, I feel sure. Don't worry about it. We're going to have great times in the evenings. There's always something on. Bye bye, and good luck," and she tripped up the ...
— The End of the Rainbow • Marian Keith

... "Dearie, I think I know. Tell me, child, will you put on the frock . . . the dress . . . costume you wore that night, and let me see you in it? It is not mere idle curiosity, my child, but something far, ...
— The Lady of the Shroud • Bram Stoker

... have two mammas, you know," said Betty, gently. "Try and tell us right dearie, and ...
— The Outdoor Girls of Deepdale • Laura Lee Hope

... replied Mrs. Berry, "he told Elizabeth. She said—— Oh, here you are, dearie. Captain Kendrick, our next door neighbor, has run in for a little call. Isn't it delightful of him? Captain Kendrick, this is my ...
— Fair Harbor • Joseph Crosby Lincoln

... each other for time and eternity. But then I should like to feel that we were something more to one another than even betrothed lovers, before the end comes, if come it does, untimely. Be generous, dearie, and say yes." ...
— What Answer? • Anna E. Dickinson

... she returned, and her sunk jaws quivered angrily. "D'ye play the condescending gentleman already! Dearie, your master did not take the news ...
— The Line of Love - Dizain des Mariages • James Branch Cabell

... park. Asked me out to luncheon, but I couldn't go. You know, dearie, I've got to be so careful. Jerry's so awful jealous—the ...
— The Easiest Way - Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911 • Eugene Walter

... cheeks Margaret MacLean fled from Ward C. If she had stayed long enough to watch the little gray wisp of a woman move quietly from cot to cot, patting each small hand and asking, tenderly, "And what is your name, dearie?" she might have carried with her a happier feeling. At the door of the board-room she ran ...
— The Primrose Ring • Ruth Sawyer

... the distance was silent, Ratcliffe for the first time addressed her, and it was in that cold sarcastic indifferent tone familiar to habitual depravity, whose crimes are instigated by custom rather than by passion. "This is a braw night for ye, dearie," he said, attempting to pass his arm across her shoulder, "to be on the green hill wi' your jo." Jeanie extricated herself from his grasp, but did not make ...
— The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... strong. (It'll need to be strong to hold you up, won't it, dearie?) Now, please take your tea like a good girl, to brace up your courage. Or would you like a ...
— A Woman who went to Alaska • May Kellogg Sullivan

... dearie," said one of the men, who from a superior neatness of apparel might have been a clerk. "You've come the right road, for you've met us. And now you're not going away." And he came forward ...
— The Half-Hearted • John Buchan

... dearie?" she questioned. "It is a shame to interrupt your pleasure, but your father has telephoned that you must be at ...
— I Spy • Natalie Sumner Lincoln

... only telling about your name, my dearie girl. He always gave me my way, poor man, so I fixed on Beatrice. I said it would fit all round, and it did. Shut that window, will you, Bee?—the wind is very sharp for the time of year. You don't mind my calling you Bee now and then—even if it doesn't seem quite to ...
— The Honorable Miss - A Story of an Old-Fashioned Town • L. T. Meade

... Dearie me, I can't describe it. All its lilt and rhythm and color and humanness as well. And ladies walking along with huge white balloons from the White House as though they had been blowing bubbles from some great clay pipes. And a plump, ...
— Vignettes of San Francisco • Almira Bailey

... When I got to the cot there was Edward's cherubic mug peeping out from under about four miles of nice clean bandages and an attendant sitting daintily on his chest. When he saw me he calmed down and dismissed the menagerie for the nonce. 'Dearie,' he said, taking my shrinking little hand in his, 'it was awful. It's only by mere chance that you find me custodian of this Reptile Bazar instead of one of these "mangled remains" things. It was this way. ...
— The Sorrows of a Show Girl • Kenneth McGaffey

... perfectly lovely time," insisted Jane, "but I must put Judy to bed. She is apt to walk in her sleep when overtired. Come, dearie, toddle along. Good night, girls. Pleasant dreams," and those who were not too interested in the fudge ...
— Jane Allen: Junior • Edith Bancroft

... to show that a girl must be careful. If Lilas had behaved herself she'd have been married and rich like you. Oh, I can't believe it has come true! Think of it yourself, dearie; I— I'm nearly out of my head." She dabbed at her moistening eyes, becoming more and more excited as she dwelt upon the family's sudden rise to affluence. She was still rejoicing garrulously when Lorelei burst into one of her rare passions of weeping and buried her face in ...
— The Auction Block • Rex Beach

... it? Ah! she looks rugged, now; don't she? and livin' in the old Shannon house, too. 'T is dretful onhealthy, they say, the Shannon house; but havin' a rugged start, you see, you may weather it a consid'able time, dearie, and be a comfort to them as has you WHILE they has you. My Philena, her cheeks was just like yours, like two pinies. And where is she now? Ah! I've seen trouble, Miss Bellwether. Miss Grahame here can tell you of some of the trouble ...
— Hildegarde's Neighbors • Laura E. Richards

... second time; for I tell thee, Craven is as innocent as thee or me; and though t' devil and t' lawyers hev all t' evidence on their side, I'll lay thee twenty sovereigns that right'll win. What dost ta say, Phyllis, dearie?" ...
— The Hallam Succession • Amelia Edith Barr

... cheeks grew pink, and the lost spirit of her youth sent a sudden sparkle to her eyes. "You'd laugh, dearie. ...
— Across the Years • Eleanor H. Porter

... Dawes. "Don't you know, dearie? You must be a young 'un, you must. Why, when I was a gal every one knew Wych Street. It was just down there where they ...
— The Best British Short Stories of 1922 • Edward J. O'Brien and John Cournos, editors

... "I feel, dearie," said Mats, "that I ought to know what concerns your life's happiness. You don't know how anxious I've been about you while you were sick...." If there seemed a tiny scratch in that, the next remark was more like a purr: "People ...
— V. V.'s Eyes • Henry Sydnor Harrison

... Norma where it came from? Who brought the dearie here and left it in the naughty room? Tell its Norma," continued Miss Bonkowski, on her knees upon the bare and dirty floor, and eyeing the dainty embroidery and examining the quality of the fine white dress ...
— The Angel of the Tenement • George Madden Martin

... Mother, if she were here, would pat my check where the hollow place is, and murmur: "Never mind, Dawnie dearie, Mother thinks you are beautiful just the same." Of such blessed stuff ...
— Dawn O'Hara, The Girl Who Laughed • Edna Ferber

... "Yes, dearie," said the nurse, and smiled a large, and toothful smile as she turned and stepped out into the hall. Pete's listless, dark eyes followed her. "Fer Gawd's sake!" he muttered. His eyes closed. He wondered what had become of his honest-to-Gosh ...
— The Ridin' Kid from Powder River • Henry Herbert Knibbs

... "H-sh, h-sh, dearie!" Mrs. Donovan's hand slipped over the red lips and she sent a quick glance over her shoulder. Bewildered and surprised as she was she realized that her niece's age was not to be shouted out in the vestibule of the Washington ...
— Mary Rose of Mifflin • Frances R. Sterrett

... I didn't mean to, but I fell off. [Unhooking LILY'S dress.] It was the front-door I 'eard a minute ago, then? It gave me sech a start. [In difficulties with the hooks.] Turn more to the light, dearie. These dressmakers do it a' purpose, I b'lieve. The 'ooks on that noo gown o' mine are a perfect myst'ry. ...
— The 'Mind the Paint' Girl - A Comedy in Four Acts • Arthur Pinero

... 'measly' and it isn't a 'dicky-bird!'" she answered indignantly. "And I'll thank you not to call it that. It's a love-bird, and its name is Dearie!" ...
— Half A Chance • Frederic S. Isham

... "his nightshirt thrust into brown trousers." Even when the small girl insisted on "reading aloud to him one of the hymns from Keble's Christian Year," he did not, as the saying is, turn a hair. His attachment to his daughter Mariette—his "dearie girl," as he spoke of her with unaffected softness of phrase—also helps one to realize that he was not all Olympian. Meredith, the condemner of the "guarded life," was humanly nervous in guarding his own little daughter. "He would never ...
— The Art of Letters • Robert Lynd

... forward, "don't feel so, my lamb! I'm sorry you had to know this. I tried hard to keep it from you. But it's all out now, and you must try to bear it. Your father don't realize—he hasn't meant to hurt you. He's fond of you, dearie. And he's going to take you to foreign lands, and you can see all the great pictures and statues, and have a chance to learn all the things you spoke of—designing and such. Don't look ...
— A Prairie Infanta • Eva Wilder Brodhead

... the happy days I spent wi' you, my dearie; And now what lands between us lie, How can I be ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... open her mouth. The girl still drew long, sobbing breaths, but before her aunt left the room she lay quiet, her eyes closed. The other was struck by the way her pallor brought out the thinness of her lovely face. She hovered helplessly for a moment over the bed. "Is there anything I can do for you, dearie?" ...
— The Squirrel-Cage • Dorothy Canfield

... are you, dearie ... rich in youth and health and happiness and ambition. Aren't they ...
— Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1905 to 1906 • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... "Dearie me, no," sighed the old lady; "only it do seem such a wild-goose chase. There'll be no one to take care of us, and that dreadful black, Jimmy"—nurse always said his name with a sort of disrelish—"will be hanging about here ...
— Bunyip Land - A Story of Adventure in New Guinea • George Manville Fenn

... dear, you are exactly like a feather," said Fortune; "it aint to be expected that a young thing like you could be a mother. But what's gone wrong, dearie? ...
— A Little Mother to the Others • L. T. Meade

... "Oh, dearie," he protested, in a tone as a child would have done, "what does a day or two matter? Be a darling old mother and let me go. Tom has a gun for me, and Mr. Talbot is going to lend us his red setter. Tom's sister is going, ...
— The Fortunes of Oliver Horn • F. Hopkinson Smith

... "Yes dearie" replied Marshland. Now Helen dear you rest on the sofa and I'll bring you some tea" said Gladys. Helen flung herself down, quite ...
— Daisy Ashford: Her Book • Daisy Ashford

... 'Dearie,' she said, 'dandling piece, sweet bit, there are no true men.' She had an entreaty in her tone, and her large blue eyes gazed fixedly. 'Say that my cousin Anne was a heretic. I know naught of it save that my bones have ached always since the holy blood of Hailes was ...
— Privy Seal - His Last Venture • Ford Madox Ford

... dearie?" says the ogre's wife. "Then if it's that little rogue that stole your gold and the hen that laid the golden eggs he's sure to have got into the oven." And they both rushed to the oven. But Jack wasn't there, luckily, and the ogre's wife said: ...
— Types of Children's Literature • Edited by Walter Barnes

... so late you are, dearie! And so dark it's grown—and cold. Your poor little hands are blue. Why, what have you here, hidin' under your shawl? Beryl Lynch! Dear love us—a doll!" With a laugh that was like a tinkling of low pitched bells the little mother drew the treasure from its hiding place. But as ...
— Red-Robin • Jane Abbott

... "But, dearie, that's so barbarous like!" exclaimed the dismayed Samaritan. "There ought to be some one to say some prayers an' ...
— The Long Chance • Peter B. Kyne

... erected in one of her parks in Hungary a handsome temple in his honour, with an inscription of homage to him. In his letters he calls her his "confessor," and in one he addresses her as "Liebe, liebe, liebe, liebe Graefin," showing that she was his dearie ...
— The Love Affairs of Great Musicians, Volume 1 • Rupert Hughes

... that little gal's at to see if maybe I couldn't brighten things up a little for her and sure enough she was all smiles when she seen me and we talked a wile about this in that and she tried to get personal and called me cherry which is like we say dearie and finely I made the remark that I didn't think we would be here much longer and then I seen she was going to blubber so I kind of petted her hand and stroked her hair and she poked her lips out and I give her a smack Al ...
— The Real Dope • Ring Lardner

... laughed and forgot to be cynical. "I know what you'd like to have me, dearie, but this is my moment of emancipation." She crossed the room and looked down at the tiny bit of humanity curled like a kitten in the curve of her daughter's arm. "I'm not going to be your grandmother, yet, midget," she announced, with decision. ...
— The Gay Cockade • Temple Bailey

... hoose and ha', but even those that should be our protectors oot o' their manhood! See," added she, "do ye see wha yon is, skulking as far as he can get frae our door wi' the weel-filled sack upon his shouthers? It is yer ain dearie, Florence Wilson! O the betrayer o' his country!—He's a coward, Janet, like the rest o' them, and shall ne'er ca' ye his wife while I live to ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Volume VI • Various

... go out, 'you shall help me, dearie. We'll write this great fairy-tale of mine together, eh?' He stooped and kissed her, feeling love and tenderness and sympathy in ...
— A Prisoner in Fairyland • Algernon Blackwood

... come and tell me birdie! All night long the snow was falling; Long ago, I heard you calling; Tell me, dearie, Are you weary? Can you sleep, when winds are blowing? Frosts are biting, clouds are snowing? Come! Oh, come and tell ...
— Our Young Folks at Home and Abroad • Various

... Her hat is upstairs. Her flowers are in the hall. She left her ulster on my bed, and her books are on the window-sill," said mamma. She wouldn't look at me. "Remember, dearie, your medicines are all labelled, and I put needles in your work-box all threaded. Don't sit in draughts and don't read in a dim light. Have a good time and study hard and come back soon. Good—bye, ...
— As Seen By Me • Lilian Bell

... 'tis here," she said tenderly. "I guess you do feel it. But, dearie, there's lots of folks walkin' round doin' their work with their hearts droppin' blood all the time. Only you mustn't listen to it. You just say, 'I'll do the things I've got to do, an' I'll fix my mind on 'em. I won't cry till to-morrow.' ...
— Country Neighbors • Alice Brown

... "Dearie," said the young married man, "I have to go to New York on business. It will only take a day or so and I hope you won't miss me too much while ...
— More Toasts • Marion Dix Mosher

... She's a mean one, ain't she? I gained this week—half a pound. Lord, I'm gittin' fat! All my clothes are gittin' too small for me. Don't know what I'll do. Did you lose much, dearie? ...
— The Straw • Eugene O'Neill

... to the news stand and pretended to hunt for a magazine. I reached over and stroked her hand. "Don't take it too hard, dearie," I said. "He's put out to-night, and maybe he isn't well. Men are like babies. If their stomachs are all right and have plenty in them, they're pleasant enough. It's been my experience that your cranky man's a ...
— Where There's A Will • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... the earth's all bloody,' said Hazel. 'And it's allus the little small uns. There! He's got a jenny-wren. Oh, dearie me! it's like I've killed 'em; it's all along of ...
— Gone to Earth • Mary Webb



Words linked to "Dearie" :   mollycoddle, teacher's pet, macushla, chosen, lover



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