Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Dear   /dɪr/   Listen
Dear

adjective
(compar. dearer; superl. dearest)
1.
Dearly loved.  Synonyms: beloved, darling.
2.
With or in a close or intimate relationship.  Synonyms: good, near.  "My sisters and brothers are near and dear"
3.
Earnest.  Synonyms: devout, earnest, heartfelt.  "Devout wishes for their success" , "Heartfelt condolences"
4.
Having a high price.  Synonyms: costly, high-priced, pricey, pricy.  "High-priced merchandise" , "Much too dear for my pocketbook" , "A pricey restaurant"



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Dear" Quotes from Famous Books



... "My dear sir, I honestly believe you. I know what Sibylla was at home, fretful, wayward, and restless; and those tendencies are not likely to be lessened, now disease has shown itself. I always feared it was in her constitution; that, in spite of all our ...
— Verner's Pride • Mrs. Henry Wood

... This light tossing away of an honest title, a respectable fortune! My dear sir, there is such a thing as ...
— The Port of Missing Men • Meredith Nicholson

... dear child,' said Clara, when Madge consented to go. 'I shall lie on the grass and perhaps ...
— Clara Hopgood • Mark Rutherford

... circumstances nor time can annihilate. Some day we shall take up the threads where they broke off. I always look forward to that. A man may be contented with one woman's love, but not with one woman's friendship. I am glad that you are as dear to Helena as you are to me. In time, perhaps we may all three ...
— The Californians • Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton

... gunboats,' &c. He objected to the force of sea-fencibles, or long-shore organisation, because he considered it more useful to have the sea-going ships manned. Speaking of this coastal defence scheme, he said: 'It would be a good bone for the officers to pick, but a very dear ...
— Sea-Power and Other Studies • Admiral Sir Cyprian Bridge

... yonder hall, and pore on all The portraits of thy race; The courage high that fires each eye Canst thou endure to face?" "I'll bring no blame on thy fair name, Or my forefathers slight! But kiss and bless me, mother dear, Ere ...
— A Celtic Psaltery • Alfred Perceval Graves

... dear!" cried Mr. Rabbit. "What shall I do! What shall I do! You have broken the bottom out of my nice ...
— Fairy Tales from Brazil - How and Why Tales from Brazilian Folk-Lore • Elsie Spicer Eells

... DEAR FATHER—I take the opportunity of writing by a paroled prisoner, to let you know that I am well, and doing as well as could be expected under the circumstances. I have seen some rather hard times, but the worst is past. Our lives are now safe, ...
— Daring and Suffering: - A History of the Great Railroad Adventure • William Pittenger

... vengue, moun bon!—Tell him what's happened, old dear!" screamed the Moorish woman, leaning over the first floor gallery with a ...
— Tartarin of Tarascon • Alphonse Daudet

... Americans are a very peculiar people, and but little affected, as yet, with the cacoethes scribendi; a malady which the present work, in its humble sphere, is designed to disseminate. We are not in the habit of frequently publishing, and above all, of publishing volumes. Books are dear, private libraries small, public ones few, and encouragement for even the best original publications but limited. Of this we have known some melancholy instances. It is impossible for either a Frenchman or an Englishman to judge correctly ...
— North American Medical and Surgical Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3, July, 1826 • Various

... equally divided, with sharp contests between them. I said, that seemed a pity. "A pity?" cried he; "not at all! Only think of all the zeal and activity which the collision calls forth!" "Ah, but, my dear friend," I answered, "only think of all the nonsense which you now hold quite firmly, which you would never have held if you had not been contradicting your adversary in it all these years!" The more serious the people, and the more prominent the religious side in it, the greater is the danger ...
— Culture and Anarchy • Matthew Arnold

... "Dear Mrs. D'Arcy! Dear Catherine! I am afraid we are late. We went too far—we partly lost ourselves. We got into a long, but oh! such a lovely lane—where I never was before, and then, we have had a little ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 3, August, 1850. • Various

... out in the evening hand in hand with my dear wife to enjoy the sunset; for to me who love scenery, of all that I have seen or can see, there is none surpasses that of heaven. A glorious sunset brings with it a thousand thoughts that ...
— Fragments of science, V. 1-2 • John Tyndall

... home, gone is the laughter, When it strikes home your heart's forlorn, When it strikes home the tears fall faster, For those dear ones who've passed and gone. And when you hear of brave boys dying, You may not care, they're not your own; But just suppose you lost your loved ones, That is the time when it strikes home. Out on the street, a newsboy crying "Extra," ...
— Writing for Vaudeville • Brett Page

... who began with simply catching this tone of tolerance, and who have been insensibly borne along to an enfeebled belief that there is such a thing as religious truth at all, and that the truth lies in the word of God. Dear friends! let me beseech you to take heed lest, while you are only conscious of your hearts expanding with the genial glow of liberality, by little and little you lose your power of discerning between things that differ, your sense of the worth of the Scripture as the depository of ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... unable to conceive; but I knew well enough that it came from the doctor's chimney; I saw well enough that my father had already disappeared; and in despite of reason, I connected in my mind the loss of that dear protector with the ribbon of foul smoke that trailed along ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 5 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... ally, and will more surely assist me than all my vehemence. Sometimes— nay, often—it is better to say nothing, for there is a constant tendency in Nature towards rectification, and her quiet protest and persuasiveness are hindered by personal interference. If anybody very dear to me were to fall into any heresy of belief or of conduct, I am not sure that I ought to rebuke him, and that he would not sooner be converted by observing my silent respect for him than by preaching ...
— Pages from a Journal with Other Papers • Mark Rutherford

... through the chambers of her soul. "Not my will but Thine be done." She pressed nearer the picture, gazing into that strong, patient, suffering face through the rain of welcome tears. "O Christ!" she whispered, "dear blessed Christ! I understand—now. Help me! Help me!" Then, after a pause, "Not ...
— The Doctor - A Tale Of The Rockies • Ralph Connor

... kinds, as the Torbay oysters, are generally considered only fit for stewing and sauces, and as an addition to rump-steak puddings and pies, though some persons prefer them to the smaller oysters, even when not cooked. Of late years English oysters have become scarce and dear; and in consequence the American Blue Point oysters find ...
— Enquire Within Upon Everything - The Great Victorian Domestic Standby • Anonymous

... is before! Close the ranks! Close up the ranks! We'll hunt his legions from our shore, Close the ranks! Close up the ranks! Our wives, our children are behind, Our mothers, sisters, dear and kind, Their voices reach us on the wind, Close the ranks! Close up ...
— War Poetry of the South • Various

... their eyes, and to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto God." Col. 1:13—"Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son." The kingdom of light is headed by a person—Jesus Christ; the kingdom of darkness, by a person—Satan. The one is a person equally with ...
— The Great Doctrines of the Bible • Rev. William Evans

... at the sound of the voice, opened his eyes, and in the beauteous form which was reclining over him, beheld his dear, dear Emily. ...
— The King's Own • Captain Frederick Marryat

... "My dear sir," said he, with some earnestness, "you had much better content yourself with such assistance as I can professionally and consistently give you. Believe [me], I am willing to do a lawyer's utmost, and to do more would be as unsafe for the client ...
— The Ancestral Footstep (fragment) - Outlines of an English Romance • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... essential element is spirituality. In and around Copley Square in Boston, within the radius of one block, are several denominations whose order of worship varies, the one from another. The Baptist believes in immersion as the outer sign of the inner newness of life; the Episcopalian holds dear his ritual; the Unitarian and the Presbyterian, and perhaps a half-dozen other sects in close proximity (which express the various forms of what they call "new thought"), each and all exist and ...
— The Life Radiant • Lilian Whiting

... picture was so pretty! Her hair was dark brown and waved naturally away from her forehead, making her face rather oval than round; her gray eyes were clear and large, and, when she was not smiling or talking, there was a serious shadow far down in them. She had a dear little mouth, and I liked to make her laugh that I might see the dimples come and go ...
— When Grandmamma Was New - The Story of a Virginia Childhood • Marion Harland

... DEAR SIR: Your last letter has a valuable suggestion. Your Carbon Electrodes ARE the very best now in use, and Metallic Electrodes are objectionable from the metallic influence they impart, even if no metal can be chemically traced ...
— Buchanan's Journal of Man, February 1887 - Volume 1, Number 1 • Various

... more wounded; we spent two barrels of powder, and eleven days' time, and all to get the understanding how to make an Indian mine, or how to keep garrison in a hollow tree; and with this wit, bought at this dear price, we came away, having taken in some fresh water, but got no ...
— The Life, Adventures & Piracies of the Famous Captain Singleton • Daniel Defoe

... from the peg where it has used to hang for twenty years, methinks I hear one of our opponents cry out, "Friend Sharpe, you are absurdly scrupulous." "You may innocently aid Government in doing wrong," adds another. While Liberty Party yelps at his heels, "My dear Sir, you are quite losing your influence!" And indeed it is melancholy to reflect how, from that moment the mighty underclerk of the War Office(!) dwindled into the mere Granville Sharpe of history! the man of whom Mansfield and Hargrave were content to ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... "DEAR RED: I'm not going to lecture any more forever. I've got things ciphered down to a fraction now. I know just about what it will cost to live, and I can make the money without lecturing. Therefore, old man, count ...
— The Boys' Life of Mark Twain • Albert Bigelow Paine

... religious ideas in post-Buddhist times. The Brahmans indeed never ceased to give the sacrificial system their theoretical and, when possible, their practical approval, for it embodies a principle most dear to them, namely, that the other castes can obtain success and heaven only under the guidance of Brahmans and by rites which only Brahmans can perform. But for this very reason it incurred the hostility not only of philosophers ...
— Hinduism and Buddhism, Vol I. (of 3) - An Historical Sketch • Charles Eliot

... away without Mesty, if I can help it. O dear, how abominable a midshipman's berth is after a long run on shore! I positively must go on deck and look at the shore, if ...
— Mr. Midshipman Easy • Frederick Marryat

... of a temperance sentiment, and Rosie's song was "Father, dear father, come home with me now," a selection which at the practices had almost moved the spectators to tears. Joel Davis, because he was the biggest boy in the school, and hadn't anything to do but sit still, acted the part of Rosie's father. He sat at a table with three ...
— 'Lizbeth of the Dale • Marian Keith

... work might be undertaken by the policy of Cabades; without a miracle, it might be accomplished by his son, so formidable to the Romans, under the name of Chosroes; so dear to the Orientals, under the appellation of Nushirwan. The Persian monarch held in his hand the keys both of peace and war; but he stipulated, in every treaty, that Justinian should contribute to the expense of a common barrier, which equally protected the two empires ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 4 • Edward Gibbon

... my dear child! You are the ideal of a bride! You ought to be painted as you are! And what good taste to wear roses, and not orange-flowers, which are so common, and only good for shopgirls. Turn around! You ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... grim Geneva ministers With anxious scowl drew near,{I} As you have seen the ravens flock Around the dying deer. He would not deign them word nor sign, But alone he bent the knee; And veil'd his face for Christ's dear grace Beneath the gallows-tree. Then radiant and serene he rose, And cast his cloak away: For he had ta'en his latest look Of earth, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 347, September, 1844 • Various

... bird, which was destined to play a part in all future celebrations of the kind. The completed returns showed that the Whigs had elected Seward and Bradish by ten thousand four hundred and twenty-one majority,[300] five of the eight senators, and nearly two-thirds of the assemblymen. "Well, dear Seward," wrote Weed, "we are victorious; God be thanked—gratefully and devoutly thanked."[301] Seward was no less affected. "It is a fearful post I have coveted," he wrote; "I shudder at my temerity.... ...
— A Political History of the State of New York, Volumes 1-3 • DeAlva Stanwood Alexander

... good-bye, dear young reader! I must not keep you any longer, for I am sure you have a great desire to know about Paula; and anyway, I suppose you will have done what I would have done at your age, namely, read the story first, and left my poor preface to the last—for ...
— Paula the Waldensian • Eva Lecomte

... "My dear Madame Spencer," said the Secretary, "what you say as to the original reason for this little meeting, arranged by our mutual friend, Mr. Harleston, is absolutely correct—except that it was a mere man who was desirous of ...
— The Cab of the Sleeping Horse • John Reed Scott

... Gourbi Island, which was apparently the only spot in their new world from which they could hope to derive their future sustenance. Captain Servadac tried to console himself with the reflection that Gourbi Island was, after all, a fragment of a French colony, and as such almost like a bit of his dear France; and the plan of returning thither was on the point of being adopted, when Lieutenant Procope remarked that they ought to remember that they had not hitherto made an entire circuit of the new shores of the sea on which ...
— Off on a Comet • Jules Verne

... the metric system of weights and measures, of which France had the glorious initiative, was held out to us, but here we are simply invited to sacrifice traditions dear to our navy, to national science, by adding ...
— International Conference Held at Washington for the Purpose of Fixing a Prime Meridian and a Universal Day. October, 1884. • Various

... captivate us are what we were, what we must be again some day. We were nature as they are; and culture, following the way of reason and of liberty, must bring us back to nature. Accordingly, these objects are an image of our infancy irrevocably past—of our infancy which will remain eternally very dear to us, and thus they infuse a certain melancholy into us; they are also the image of our highest perfection in the ideal world, whence they excite a sublime emotion ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... symptoms of hysteria are constituted, by a process of conversion, out of the injured emotions, which then sink into the background or altogether out of consciousness. Thus, they found the prolonged tension of nursing a near and dear relative to be a very frequent factor in the production of hysteria. For instance, an originally rheumatic pain experienced by a daughter when nursing her father becomes the symbol in memory of her painful psychic excitement, and this perhaps for several reasons, but chiefly because ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 1 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... flower from his buttonhole he handed it to her. Oddly enough, it seemed to him that half the table was watching and listening to them. Suddenly the lady uttered a little cry. "Dear me! it's full of thorns; of course you picked and arranged it yourself, for any lady would have wrapped something ...
— The Bell-Ringer of Angel's and Other Stories • Bret Harte

... a sad event, my dear wife," he said; "but we must bear it patiently, and endeavour to do the best we can in the circumstances in which we are placed. I am anxious to land you and Edith without delay; and I propose to send you and the boys under ...
— Twice Lost • W.H.G. Kingston

... M. My dear chap, I'm very sorry, but I really couldn't help it. There's no woman in the business at all. Mare clausum merely means the place where they catch the seals, you ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 104, May 13, 1893 • Various

... in this gallery, and he said he would think of it. I to my Lord's and gave order for horses to be got to draw my Lord's great coach to Mr. Crew's. Mr. Morrice the upholsterer came himself to-day to take notice what furniture we lack for our lodgings at Whitehall. My dear friend Mr. Fuller of Twickenham and I dined alone at the Sun Tavern, where he told me how he had the grant of being Dean of St. Patrick's, in Ireland; and I told him my condition, and both rejoiced ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... womanhood that the poet Heine dragged himself in May 1848 to bid adieu to the lovely idols of his youth, before he lay, never again to rise, on his mattress-grave in the Rue d'Amsterdam. "As I entered the hall," he writes, "where the most blessed goddess of beauty, our dear lady of Melos, stands on her pedestal, I well-nigh broke down, and fell at her feet sobbing piteously, so that even a heart of stone must be softened. And the goddess gazed at me compassionately, yet withal so comfortless, as who should say: 'Seest thou not that I have ...
— The Story of Paris • Thomas Okey

... "My dear!—my—DEAR!" And then he too hid his face as if blinded by a pitiless light. When he raised it tears glistened on his lashes and a happiness that was like pain pierced him. "Oh! If I had only known—" he choked. ...
— The Auction Block • Rex Beach

... taught ourselves the way to restore these lost formulae to their rightful places, the explanation of the mere waifs and strays of folklore will be attended with some approach to scientific accuracy, and we shall then be in a position to get rid of that shibboleth so dear to the non-folklore critic, that all these things we deal with ...
— Folklore as an Historical Science • George Laurence Gomme

... "DEAR SIR: I received your favor of the 9th, and lose no time in making a reply. The whole story about my pronouncing the Mormon inscription to be 'reformed Egyptian hieroglyphics' is perfectly false. Some ...
— The Story of the Mormons: • William Alexander Linn

... curse my innocence. Of all affliction taught a lover yet, 'Tis sure the hardest science to forget! 190 How shall I lose the sin, yet keep the sense, And love the offender, yet detest the offence? How the dear object from the crime remove, Or how distinguish penitence from love? Unequal task! a passion to resign, For hearts so touch'd, so pierced, so lost as mine. Ere such a soul regains its peaceful state, How often must it love, how often hate! How often hope, despair, resent, regret, Conceal, ...
— The Poetical Works Of Alexander Pope, Vol. 1 • Alexander Pope et al

... were in her spotless kitchen at Ingleside, but her thoughts were on the hills around Verdun. "Mrs. Dr. dear," she would stick her head in at Mrs. Blythe's door the last thing at night to remark, "I do hope the French have hung onto the Crow's Wood today," and she woke at dawn to wonder if Dead Man's Hill—surely named by some prophet—was still held ...
— Rilla of Ingleside • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... sun beats down upon it like the blast from an open furnace-door. The story is told in Borneo of a dissolute planter who died from sunstroke. The day after the funeral a spirit message reached the widow of the dear departed. "Please send down my blankets" it said. But it is the terrible humidity which makes the climate dangerous; a humidity due to the innumerable swamps, the source of pestilence and fever, and to the incredible rainfall, which averages over six and a half feet a year. ...
— Where the Strange Trails Go Down • E. Alexander Powell

... "Dear D'Artagnan, dear Porthos,—My friends, perhaps this is the last time you will hear from me. I entrust certain papers which are at Bragelonne to your keeping; if in three months you do not hear of me, take possession of them. May ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol III • Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.

... calmly. "My mind is made up. And along with several other qualities, Grandmother, dear, I've ...
— The Fashionable Adventures of Joshua Craig • David Graham Phillips

... brought a share of financial success to him. He had experienced poverty, and as he subsequently wrote, in an article called "Why I Believe in Poverty," he was deeply grateful for his experience. He had known what it was to be poor; he had seen others dear to him suffer for the bare necessities; there was, in fact, not a single step on that hard road that he had not travelled. He could, therefore, sympathize with the fullest understanding with those similarly situated, could help as one who ...
— The Americanization of Edward Bok - The Autobiography of a Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward William Bok

... commerce, and language of their neighbours; and no means is thought illegitimate, be it fraud in policy or bloodshed in war, to secure this absolutely nugatory end. Is not one country as much a country as another? Is it not as dear to its inhabitants? What then is gained by oppressing its genius or by seeking to ...
— The Life of Reason • George Santayana

... was past of joy and pleasant cheer, Whilst yet the objects of my love were unremoved and near; But now my sad and sorry fate hath sundered me and them And I to-day must weep for those that were to me most dear. ...
— The Book Of The Thousand Nights And One Night, Volume III • Anonymous

... then—it is the pledge of life! Oh! it is my dear Southampton's Last, last remaining stay! his thread of being, Which more than worlds I prize!—Oh, take it, then; Take it, thou guardian angel of my life, And offer up the incense of my prayer! Oh, beg, entreat, implore her majesty, From public ...
— The Earl of Essex • Henry Jones

... vulgar; finer the hot smells of the playhouse, more meet for a cultured nostril!" Of course Austin made all this nonsense up himself, but he felt so happy that it amused him to attribute the words to the dear flower-friends who were all around him, and to whom he could never be really faithless. Faugh! that playhouse! He would never enter one again. Be an actor! Lubin was a cleaner gentleman than any painted Buskin on the stage. Here, in the clear, pure splendour ...
— Austin and His Friends • Frederic H. Balfour

... Stretching his arms, the ruler of the Madras fell down on the Earth, with face directed towards king Yudhishthira the just, like a tall banner erected to the honour of Indra falling down on the ground. Like a dear wife advancing to receive her dear lord about to fall on her breast, the Earth then seemed, from affection, to rise a little for receiving that bull among men as he fell down with mangled limbs bathed in blood. The puissant Shalya, having long enjoyed the Earth like a dear wife, now seemed to sleep ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 - Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 • Unknown

... conversation which Glossin had learned from his former patron), I see you often carry a gun, and I hope you will be soon able to take the field again. I observe you confine yourself always to your own side of the Hazleshaws burn. I hope, my dear sir, you will make no scruple of following your game to the Ellangowan bank; I believe it is rather the best exposure of the two for woodcocks, although both ...
— Guy Mannering, or The Astrologer, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... last I had no consciousness of the sexual nature of my passion, and the thought of doing more than embrace and kiss him in an innocent manner never crossed my mind. For two summers I had nights of tossing on my bed (although I almost never was sleepless for any cause) when I would see his dear face and form, in and out of the swimming pool, or engaged perhaps in singing or in showing his beautiful teeth. I seldom was smitten with little girls, and I found myself embarrassed in their company after my ninth ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 5 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... too tired," murmured Jeanne. "I am going to stop here, and be very, very good. But, mamma dear, ...
— A Love Episode • Emile Zola

... The poor, dear king [William IV.], who it seems knows as much about painting as una vacca spagnuola, lets himself, his family, and family animals be painted by whoever begs to be allowed that honor. So when the pictures were all hung ...
— Records of a Girlhood • Frances Anne Kemble

... that in all he heard of her, in everything she did, she kept robbing him still further of all that was dear to him in ...
— The Red Cross Girl • Richard Harding Davis

... better, my own dear Madeleine? What can I do for you?" asked Bertha, who was kneeling in ...
— Fairy Fingers - A Novel • Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie

... not reply. After a while her mother said, "Tell me just one thing dear, if you can. Do you care for ...
— The High Calling • Charles M. Sheldon

... Simple," cried Mrs Trotter, out of breath with climbing up the brig's side; "what a man you've grown,—and such a handsome man, too! Dear, dear, it makes me feel quite old to look at you, when I call to mind the little boy whom I had charge of in the cockpit. Don't you think I look very old and ugly, Mr Simple?" continued she, ...
— Peter Simple and The Three Cutters, Vol. 1-2 • Frederick Marryat

... MY DEAR BOYS: This book is a complete story in itself, but forms the fourth volume in a line issued under the general title, "The Second Rover Boys Series for ...
— The Rover Boys on a Hunt - or The Mysterious House in the Woods • Arthur M. Winfield (Edward Stratemeyer)

... adventurers had been absent even a longer time, but never did home seem so dear to them as now, and never did they find on their return so warm a welcome as ...
— The Giraffe Hunters • Mayne Reid

... Zummaun, though extremely weakened by almost continual privation of sleep and long abstinence, soon recovered his health. When he found himself in a condition to undertake the voyage, he took Marzavan aside, and said, "Dear Marzavan, it is now time to perform the promise you have made me. My impatience to behold the charming princess, and to relieve her of the torments she is now suffering on my account, is such, that if we ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Complete • Anonymous

... the fair Town of Plymouth is by the sea-side, The Sound is so blue and so still and so wide, Encircled with hills, and with forests all green, As a crown of fresh leaves on the head of a queen. O dear Plymouth town, and O blue Plymouth Sound! O where is your equal on earth to ...
— From John O'Groats to Land's End • Robert Naylor and John Naylor

... went to work, forgetting everything in his adherence to habit. He became so absorbed in his job, that he did not look where his spadeful went, and it struck his dear wife full in ...
— Welsh Fairy Tales • William Elliot Griffis

... to the earth they sprang from, my son was heard at the foot of God's throne when they bade me go and set my foot in Poland no more. This I knew even in that island of blood and death. Letters had come to me from my dear wife; the Committee had kept me informed even there at the end of the earth. I knew that my home had perished; that of all my family, my daughter Lois alone remained to me; I knew that the days of the tyranny were numbered and that I, even I, might ...
— Aladdin of London - or Lodestar • Sir Max Pemberton

... then that I regretted most bitterly the inconsiderate conduct of some of the men. I was indeed liable to pay dear for geographical discovery, when my honour and character were delivered over to convicts, on whom, although I might confide as to courage, I could not always rely ...
— The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888 • Ernest Favenc

... you remember that? You would be married now and have a home. Remember that Christmas when you went out to visit your fiance's parents in the country? How you gloried in the happiness of home life and really longed to quit the theatre forever? Yes, Amelie dear, home is the best of all, the theatre next and children—well, you don't ...
— Plays: The Father; Countess Julie; The Outlaw; The Stronger • August Strindberg

... "Dear Friends, we were first cousins, and what not: To toil as masons was our humble lot. As just returning from a house of call, The parson bade us set about his wall. Flush'd with good liquor, cheerfully we strove To place big stones below and big above; We made too quick work—down ...
— In Search Of Gravestones Old And Curious • W.T. (William Thomas) Vincent

... Lenten sermons in S. Spirito had been preached by Maestro Francesco Zoppo, who was then very dear to the people of Florence, and he had strongly recommended the claims of that convent, of the school for youths, and particularly of the church, which had been burnt down about that time. Whereupon the chief men of that quarter, Lorenzo Ridolfi, Bartolommeo ...
— Lives of the Most Eminent Painters Sculptors and Architects - Vol 2, Berna to Michelozzo Michelozzi • Giorgio Vasari

... Belgium. Chief among them is Jean Jadot, Governor of the Societe Generale—the institution still designates its head by this ancient title—and President of the Forminiere. In him and his colleagues you find those elements of self-made success so dear to the heart of the human interest historian. It would be difficult to find anywhere a more picturesque group of men than those who, through their association with King Leopold and the Societe, have developed the Congo ...
— An African Adventure • Isaac F. Marcosson

... separation from her worse than death. When she bids him fly, he replies by one word, 'Come!' and not till she has promised to guide him to the city gates and to follow him later on his journey will he move a step towards freedom. And then, when her dear hand is about to open to him the door of his prison, it is too late. Fernan and his assassins are at hand, the stairs are surrounded, and escape is cut off. Again, in these last moments, when the locked ...
— Miss Bretherton • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... "Oh, dear Man of Wrath," I cried, hanging out into the moonlight with outstretched arms, "how much nicer thou art than lieutenants! I never missed thee more—I never longed for thee more—I never loved thee more —come up here quickly that I may ...
— The Solitary Summer • Elizabeth von Arnim

... "Gloria, dear, I wish we could have dinner together, but I promised a man and it's seven-thirty ...
— The Beautiful and Damned • F. Scott Fitzgerald

... Calverley written in a very degage style of spelling and hand-writing, scrawling freely over the filigree paper, and commencing by calling Mr. Harry, her dear Hokey-pokey-fokey, lay on his bed table by his side, amid keys, sovereigns, cigar-cases, and a bit of verbena, which Miss Amory had given him, and reminding him of the arrival of the day when he was "to stand that dinner ...
— The History of Pendennis, Vol. 2 - His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy • William Makepeace Thackeray

... my friend. Mayhap 'tis writ We ne'er shall meet. What matters it? Where'er we roam, God's light shall gleam For us on hill and wold and stream. And we shall hold the blossoms dear, And baby lips shall give us cheer, And, loving these, leal friends are we, Where'er ...
— The California Birthday Book • Various

... to buy—after such an exhibition! As well buy a wild beast. Luckily for me, I received the deposit before witnesses. The fierceness of your nature will not set aside the contract; the centurion has no choice but to keep you. He'll keep you, I warrant, but he'll make you pay dear for your criminal instincts. Oh, you don't know the life that awaits you in the ergastula! You ...
— The Brass Bell - or, The Chariot of Death • Eugene Sue

... grass, So rise up, ladies, and let him pass; He courted Miss Meadows, when her ma was away, He crossed his legs, and said his say. He crossed his legs, and he winked his eye, And then he told Miss Meadows good-by. So it's good-by, ducky, And it's good-by, dear! I'll never come to see you Until next year! For this is Mr. Rabbit, that runs on the grass, So rise up, ladies, and let ...
— Little Mr. Thimblefinger and His Queer Country • Joel Chandler Harris

... seemed to be asking of me. "Oh! say it all over again, the dear old English oaths and curses that in this God- forsaken land I never hoped ...
— Idle Ideas in 1905 • Jerome K. Jerome

... exclusion of the other are compelled to stand aside, cities will never have rest from their evils,—nor the human race, as I believe,—and then only will this our State have a possibility of life and behold the light of day.' Such was the thought, my dear Glaucon, which I would fain have uttered if it had not seemed too extravagant; for to be convinced that in no other State can there be happiness private or public is ...
— The Republic • Plato

... "Alas!" said he, "unfortunate Buddir ad Deen, what will become of thee? Whither canst thou fly for refuge against the unjust prince who persecutes thee? Was it not enough to be afflicted by the death of so dear a father? Must fortune needs add new misfortunes to just complaints?" He continued a long time in this posture, but at last rose up, and leaning his head upon his father's tombstone, his sorrows returned more violently than before; so that he sighed and mourned, ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Complete • Anonymous

... dear, I know that. Oh, by-the-bye, he sent his compliments to you. 'I am greatly indebted to Mrs. Luttrell, and I trust that I shall soon have an opportunity of thanking her properly for her kind helpfulness.' There, Livy, now we shall hear no more of ...
— Doctor Luttrell's First Patient • Rosa Nouchette Carey

... 48. The price of living became so dear that the town clerk and the under-sheriffs asked for and obtained from the Common Council an increase of emoluments.—Letter ...
— London and the Kingdom - Volume I • Reginald R. Sharpe

... caught her eye, And its friendly assistance she therefore would try.— "Dear water," she said, "do extinguish this fire, "Which will not (although 'tis my ardent desire) "Consume yonder crab-stick, which, obstinate too, "With beating that cur will have nothing to do; "And the dog, as ill-natured, you see, as the rest, "Refuses to bite this young obstinate beast; ...
— The Remarkable Adventures of an Old Woman and Her Pig - An Ancient Tale in a Modern Dress • Anonymous

... friend proceeded, and said: But when Christiana came up to the Slough of Despond, she began to be at a stand; for, said she, this is the place in which my dear husband had like to have been smothered with mud. She perceived, also, that notwithstanding the command of the King to make this place for pilgrims good, yet it was rather worse than formerly. So I asked if that were true. Yes, said the old ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... My dear B.—On my return to the Neptune all was in readiness to set sail. The wind sprang up, and we were presently wafted into a broad sheet of water, "the Sea of Tappan." The river here suddenly expands, and for the distance of ten miles will average about four miles in ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 17, No. - 480, Saturday, March 12, 1831 • Various

... he must resort, not to his religion, but to his sympathy—to the natural promptings of the heart. He is compelled to say: "After all, may be God is not so bad as we think," or, "May be your husband was better than he appeared; perhaps somehow, in some way, the dear man has squeezed in; he was a good husband, he was a kind father, and even if he is in hell, may be he is in the temperate zone, where they have occasional showers, and where, if the days are hot, the nights are reasonably cool." All I ask of Christian ...
— The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Volume VIII. - Interviews • Robert Green Ingersoll

... "My dear boy," said de Jars to the youth, "we are caught, and may as well yield gracefully. You don't know this big fellow as well as I do. He's obstinacy itself. You can make the most obstinate donkey go on by pulling its tail hard enough, but when Jeannin gets a notion into ...
— CELEBRATED CRIMES, COMPLETE - LA CONSTANTIN—1660 • ALEXANDRE DUMAS, PERE

... hood of gay wool alone, With no braid nor lining, was here; But parent love made it ever dear, And brighter ...
— Poems and Songs • Bjornstjerne Bjornson

... "My dear Mirandola," said the general, trimming his cigar, "there is no living man who appreciates your genius and your worth more than myself; perhaps I might say there is no living man who has had equal opportunities ...
— Lothair • Benjamin Disraeli

... of my great friends during my first residence in London, and they were friends of whom any man might have been proud. Others I held scarcely less dear, but they are still, happily, living, and I must refrain from dwelling upon them. I had not been long settled in London before I found work of different kinds accumulating on my hands. I wrote London ...
— Memoirs of Sir Wemyss Reid 1842-1885 • Stuart J. Reid, ed.

... impatient, my dear," said Temple as one speaking to a very young child. "And there are matters which you don't understand; which I cannot even discuss with you. But," and he winked very slyly, less at Terry than just in a general acknowledgment ...
— Man to Man • Jackson Gregory

... Rienzi with the expression of a lover— like Elvino, for instance, in the Somnanibula. He was so dreadful that I conceived the idea of making the Capitol tumble down in the second act, so as to bury him sooner in its ruins, a plan which would have cut out several of the processions, which were so dear to the heart of the director. I found my one ray of light in a lady singer, who delighted me with the fire with which she played the part of Adriano. This was a Mme. Fehringer, who was afterwards engaged by Liszt for ...
— My Life, Volume I • Richard Wagner

... she looked steadily at him through her lorgnon, and then, turning to a companion, said with a drawl: "Isn't it horrid, my dear! Every Dick, ...
— The Life of Sir Richard Burton • Thomas Wright

... compliment, my dear young lady," he said; "and I wish I could persuade Captain Somebody, of his Britannic Majesty's ship Foam, to be of the same way of thinking. It is all because he will not fancy me honest in the article of tobacco, that he has got the Montauk down ...
— Homeward Bound - or, The Chase • James Fenimore Cooper

... signal blast. Be ours," she cried, "the skiff to guide, And waft him from the mountain side." Then, like a sunbeam, swift and bright, She darted to her shallop light, 460 And, eagerly while Roderick scanned, For her dear form, his mother's band, The islet far behind her lay, And she had ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... "MY DEAR SIR: The occupation incident to the opening of the term has prevented an earlier answer to your letter of inquiry in regard to ...
— Thoughts on Educational Topics and Institutions • George S. Boutwell

... exclaimed Geoffrey, taken aback by this sudden reproof: "they are dear little things like you, darling, and they bring you tea and wave fans behind your head, and I would like to have twenty of them—to ...
— Kimono • John Paris

... country of its best hands. The soil, likewise, near the capital is barren and sandy, producing few supplies beyond the wants of the several tenants; and all other necessaries of life not raised by them must be purchased extravagantly dear. It is, indeed, surprizing how this immense city, said to contain three millions of inhabitants, is contrived to be supplied at any rate, considering the very sterile and unproductive state of the country for many miles ...
— Travels in China, Containing Descriptions, Observations, and Comparisons, Made and Collected in the Course of a Short Residence at the Imperial Palace of Yuen-Min-Yuen, and on a Subsequent Journey thr • John Barrow

... "Ah, my dear, there is a character for you!" Mr. North beamed. "She's chairman of a dozen charity organizations, leader in every new movement that appears, and manages to find ample time for her social duties, besides. ...
— The Fifth Ace • Douglas Grant

... daughter of the sea, earth-shoot most dear to bright-haired Leto's children, wide earth's immoveable marvel, who of mortals art called Delos, but of the blessed gods in Olympus the dark earth's far-seen star[1]... ... For of old time it[2] drifted before the waves and stress of winds from every side; but ...
— The Extant Odes of Pindar • Pindar

... be possible, my dear sir, that you are reduced to a condition so deplorable? Why have you not been to ...
— Ups and Downs in the Life of a Distressed Gentleman • William L. Stone

... so much," said Isobel. "That takes a great weight off my mind. Godfrey, my dear, I apologise to you for my doubts. The truth did occur to me, but I thought it impossible that a clergyman," here she looked again at Mr. Knight, "could be a thief also who did not dare to own ...
— Love Eternal • H. Rider Haggard

... what dost thou say? Where, then, is the much-honoured Chederazade? where the dear parent of ...
— Eastern Tales by Many Story Tellers • Various

... Stephen was a worthy peer; His breeches cost him but a crown; He held them sixpence all too dear, Therefore he called the tailor 'lown.' He was a king and wore the crown, And thou'se but of a low degree: It 's pride that puts this country down: Man, take thy ...
— Book of English Verse • Bulchevy

... story, my dear, that you've told against me for the last twenty years. I won't say that it's not exaggerated. Go on telling it if you like. My back's broad enough to bear it. Shall I return good for evil? Well, as I walked through the town to-day, waiting till you came up by the funicular, I saw ...
— The Jolliest School of All • Angela Brazil

... closed, Father Griffen, his eyes filled with tears, extended his arms to the Gascon, and said: "Come, come, excellent and noble creature; come, my good and dear son." ...
— A Romance of the West Indies • Eugene Sue

... "My dear!" exclaimed Erica; "where is he now, then?—why is he not here? O, Frolich! I can hardly wonder that we are punished when I think of our presumption. When we were talking beside those graves on the day of Ulla's funeral, he laughed at me for even speaking ...
— Feats on the Fiord - The third book in "The Playfellow" • Harriet Martineau

... skies are the clearest, What scenes are the fairest of all; The skies and the scenes that are dearest For ever, are those that recall To the thoughts of the hopelessly-hearted The light of the dreams that deride, With the form of the dear and departed, ...
— By-ways in Book-land - Short Essays on Literary Subjects • William Davenport Adams

... completed the outfit. I had hoped to procure furs for a moderate price in Yakutsk. But for some occult reason deerskins cost almost as much here as in Moscow. The good old days are past when peltry was so cheap and European goods so dear, that an iron cauldron fetched as many sable skins as it would hold! Stepan also insisted upon the purchase of a number of iron horse-shoes, which he explained were to be affixed to our moccasins in order to cross the Verkhoyansk mountains in safety. But the method ...
— From Paris to New York by Land • Harry de Windt

... he turned on his heel, and went back to her, and laid his hand on her shoulder. "Kaya," he said, whispering as if someone could hear, "Are you afraid? Why are you afraid to come with me, dear brother musician, dear comrade?" His voice broke. "I will take care of you. You said you would ...
— The Black Cross • Olive M. Briggs

... "My dear, I'm all appreciation, and graciously pleased with the wonders that you are showing me; but still this valley strikes me as being short of something. It's too calm and quiet. Even Eden was not complete until man appeared in it, though, ...
— The Gold Trail • Harold Bindloss

... me suddenly like a foretaste of heaven. I couldn't stand the thought of the separation otherwise. Besides, here you'd be given a farewell luncheon or dinner every day until you sailed. I'd see nothing of you. And you'd be worn out. You must come, Mary dear." ...
— Black Oxen • Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton

... to see trouble-yet," she laughed. "But I am going, Harry. I'm going to accept Mary Haines's invitation and visit her and her nice, queer husband on their ranch. You remember Mrs. Haines, that dear Western girl that we met on the steamer when ...
— The Perils of Pauline • Charles Goddard

... in having such a pupil, and happier still you, in having such a tutor ... I ask two things of you, my dear Elmar, for I suppose you will read this letter, that you will persuade the Lady Jane to write me a letter in Greek as soon as possible; for she promised she would do so ... I have also lately written to John Sturm, ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... Tuesday evening she disappeared; we tried to watch her, but in vain, she was always off by nine P. M., and was away all night, coming back next day wearied and all over mud, as if she had travelled far. She slept all next day. This went on for some months and we could make nothing of it. Poor dear creature, she looked at us wistfully when she came in, as if she would have told us if she could, and ...
— Spare Hours • John Brown

... could they see the twin hemlocks under which the two khaki tents had stood. Frank had broken up many times in his camping experiences and knew just how it felt; but the sensation was new to the others. It was as if they had just lost a dear friend—as though something had gone out of their lives that ...
— The Outdoor Chums - The First Tour of the Rod, Gun and Camera Club • Captain Quincy Allen

... would give to the republics direct access to the outer world, and would, as was believed by both Boer and British, be a signal to all the disaffected in Cape Colony to take up arms. In the western theatre of war, the early relief of Kimberley was an object dear to the hearts of all loyalists, and its loss would undoubtedly give an immediate impetus to the wave of rebellion. The necessity for immediate action was urgent, both in Natal and Cape Colony, but the former appeared for the moment to present the more critical situation. Sir Redvers, ...
— History of the War in South Africa 1899-1902 v. 1 (of 4) - Compiled by Direction of His Majesty's Government • Frederick Maurice

... have a lot to thank God for these last ten days. I have had a glorious blessing. I can say with all humility, I have been on fire for Jesus. I had a letter yesterday from the young man whom I was talking about last Sunday. He says, 'Dear Friend, My only regret now is that I did not accept Jesus as my Saviour years ago. It would have saved me so much trouble. I explained everything to my master and handed him the article back. Then he gave me two-thirds of this particular article and ...
— The Personal Touch • J. Wilbur Chapman

... write a note of repentance, sign it with the name of his favourite dog 'Fox,' and address it to his Margaret's pet spaniel, 'Tristram.' Fox would take the note in his mouth, and duly deliver it to Tristram. Margaret would then answer—'My own dear Fox, you are always loving and good, and I am a naughty little female ever to worry you, as I too often do, so we will kiss and say no more about it; your own affectionate Tris.'" The writers of such a correspondence could not have led what is ...
— Heads and Tales • Various

... by lack of room to move freely, they could do nothing. They had foolishly left no force on the ground-floor, but had all gone to the first storey, in order to be the better able to fire on their foes; and this oversight now cost them very dear. The Bolivians got jammed into an inextricable mass, in their efforts to descend the stairs at the same time; and, while thus helpless, they were mercilessly cut down and ...
— Under the Chilian Flag - A Tale of War between Chili and Peru • Harry Collingwood

... "My dear Countess," said the King, blandly, "would you hold me responsible for the actions of my officers? Believe me, the city is being searched in every corner for this rebel Captain. It is pardonable if in the search some annoyance is given to innocent persons, is it not? ...
— Princess Maritza • Percy Brebner



Words linked to "Dear" :   innocent, close, loved, expensive, lover, sincere, inexperienced person



Copyright © 2018 Free-Translator.com