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Hark   Listen
verb
Hark  v. i.  To listen; to hearken. (Now rare, except in the imperative form used as an interjection, Hark! listen.)
Hark away! Hark back! Hark forward! (Sporting), cries used to incite and guide hounds in hunting.
To hark back, to go back for a fresh start, as when one has wandered from his direct course, or made a digression. "He must have overshot the mark, and must hark back." "He harked back to the subject."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Hark" Quotes from Famous Books



... Hark! the murmur again, not lost this time, but coming and going, lightly, softly, brushing here and there, soft dark wings fanning the air, making it ever lighter, thinner. Gradually the veil lifted; things stood out, black against black, then black against grey; straight majesty of ...
— Marie • Laura E. Richards

... of Schubert in composing are well known. Elson tells the story of the creation of "Hark, Hark, the Lark!" from "Cymbeline." "It was a summer morning in 1826 that Schubert was returning from a long walk in the suburbs of Vienna, with a party of friends; they had been out to Potzleindorf, and were walking through ...
— Among the Great Masters of Music - Scenes in the Lives of Famous Musicians • Walter Rowlands

... were loaded—and literally blazed with the myriad scintillations of different-colored gems. I marveled at her strange conduct, but did not as yet guess its meaning. I moved away from the staircase and drew imperceptibly nearer to her—Hark! what was that? A strange, low rumbling like a distant earthquake, followed by a sharp cracking sound; I stopped to listen attentively. A furious gust of wind rushed round the mausoleum shrieking wildly like some devil in anger, and the strong draught flying through the gateway ...
— Vendetta - A Story of One Forgotten • Marie Corelli

... the pistol went off. Oh, you must believe that it was purely accidental! She was in a terrible state until morning. What if she had killed you, what if she had killed you! She seemed to hark ...
— The Place of Honeymoons • Harold MacGrath

... commission has its spies watching you constantly.' Calculated to inspire confidence in the most timid soul! Now we come to the soup course: Smith and Perkins' Potted Chowder. Date of November third. Er—Bert—here's something—er—really worth while, now. Hark to the song ...
— Average Jones • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... love thee, little Goose. Hark, the farmer's coming With his ugly rifle; So I must be roaming, For I dare not trifle: And the watch-dog he will now unloose, Little Goose. Some night in the future I'll come really, Make you all ...
— Chatterbox, 1905. • Various

... wait. She took her place at the bedside and tried to talk as lightly as was possible to her patient. But now there was a pause in the round of action. Her mind no longer keenly intent upon the immediate necessities of the moment, began to hark back again to the one great haunting fear that for so long had overshadowed it. Even while she exerted herself to be cheerful and watched for the smiles on Hattie's face her hands twisted tight and tighter under the folds of her ...
— A Man's Woman • Frank Norris

... Hark, in the bower of yonder tower, What maiden so sweetly sings, As the eagle flies through the sunny skies He stayeth his golden wings; And swiftly descends, and his proud neck bends, And his eyes they stream with glare, And gaze with delight, ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 579 - Volume 20, No. 579, December 8, 1832 • Various

... Hark! A gentle tapping at the blue window that looks out on the garden! What is it? Nothing; a bough of hawthorn that has come to see what we are doing in the cool kitchen. Trees are inquisitive and often excited; but they do not count, one has nothing to say to them, they are irresponsible, ...
— Our Friend the Dog • Maurice Maeterlinck

... wind and a thick gray fog. The graves in the church-yard are covered with snow, and there are great icicles in the church-porch. The wind now carries a swathe of snow along the tops of the graves, as though the "sheeted dead" were at some melancholy play; and hark! the icicles fall with a crash and jingle, like a solemn mockery of the echo of the unseemly mirth of one who is now coming ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 4, September, 1850 • Various

... dear. I am sincerely sorry, although there are worse troubles—yes, assuredly, far worse troubles. It cannot do a healthy girl any harm to work. Yes, come to me for advice if you care to, and look on me as an old friend. And hark ye, Miss Primrose, I am glad Mrs. Ellsworthy has called. Make the most of your opportunity at Shortlands, my dears. Yes; I'll look in another day ...
— The Palace Beautiful - A Story for Girls • L. T. Meade

... his arm. He made himself as natural as he could in opening the music-books and moving the candles to the best points for throwing light upon the notes; and all went well till we had played and sung "While shepherds watch," and "Star, arise," and "Hark the glad sound." Then the squire's mother, a tall gruff old lady, who was much interested in church-music, said quite unexpectedly to Andrew: "My man, I see you don't play your instrument with the ...
— Life's Little Ironies - A set of tales with some colloquial sketches entitled A Few Crusted Characters • Thomas Hardy

... the Mayor, "who am as unlearned as I am unwarlike, I will not engage either—with the Powers of the Earth, or the Prince of the Powers of the Air, and I would we were again at Woodstock;—and hark ye, good fellow," slapping Wildrake on the shoulder, "I will bestow on thee a shilling wet and a shilling dry if thou wilt go ...
— Woodstock; or, The Cavalier • Sir Walter Scott

... ye by questioning me? Into the boat with your comrades! Velsers, de Lussan, Rock see that the men get into the boats as soon as they have their dram. And hark ye, gentlemen, a word with ye!" calling them apart while the rest were being served. "Put the boldest men in the stern sheets with yourselves, the rest at the oars, and do you have your weapons ready. ...
— Sir Henry Morgan, Buccaneer - A Romance of the Spanish Main • Cyrus Townsend Brady

... "Hark! I heard a shot!" cried Fred, a minute later, while the pair were looking around trying to make up their minds in what direction to proceed next. "Maybe those are ...
— The Rover Boys at Colby Hall - or The Struggles of the Young Cadets • Arthur M. Winfield

... yon beam of seeming white Is braided out of seven-hued light, Yet in those lucid globes no ray By any chance shall break astray. Hark how the rolling surge of sound, Arches and spirals circling round, Wakes the hushed spirit through thine ear With music it is heaven ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... of clay, nor brute, Can e'er the freeman's spirit suit! He gave him choice!—Hark! how he thunders! Through human ...
— Song-waves • Theodore H. Rand

... from her presence torn? Was there a fiercer pang for her revealed In that short conflict than she yet had known? Her dark eyes grew more wildly bright, And gleamed with an intenser light, As closer drew the venomed fang, And shrill the lone bird's accents rang. But, hark! a shot—a rustling fall— Approaching steps—a sportman's call— The parent bird is in the dust; And o'er the path that homeward led, With fleeting step fair Morna fled, And breathed a prayer of thanks ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII No. 6 June 1848 • Various

... "Hark ye, Laure," said the Marquis earnestly. "I am an old man, and the life I have led has not served to maintain my youth. What I am engaged in now does not conduce to that ease of body and peace of mind which promotes long life. To you I say what I have said to no one else. We ...
— The Eagle of the Empire - A Story of Waterloo • Cyrus Townsend Brady

... arose with solemn eyes, And, moving through the vocal dark, Sat down, with bitter, ceaseless sighs, The river tones to hark— Deep in ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol 2, No 6, December 1862 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... the wags abroad do call Each other forth to rambling: Anon you'll see them in the hall For nuts and apples scrambling. Hark! how the roofs with laughter sound! Anon they'll think the house goes round: For they the cellar's depth have found, And there ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... me, O auspicious King, that Sindbad the Seaman continued:—And when we had cast anchor, the merchants and the sailors landed with their goods to sell and to buy. Then the captain turned to me and said, "Hark'ee, thou art a stranger and a pauper and tellest us that thou hast undergone frightful hardship; wherefore I have a mind to benefit thee with somewhat that may further thee to thy native land, so thou wilt ever bless me and pray for me." "So be it," answered I; "thou shalt have my prayers." ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... know, Stephen," in a lower tone, "we were very near being caught on the hill to-day. I was all bent over as usual in my old woman's dress, and Eldon was limping along on his crutch stick when—hark! what was that?" ...
— Idle Hour Stories • Eugenia Dunlap Potts

... thought of the imprudence of which I had been guilty, and the predicament in which I was plunged, had so puzzled and confounded me, that I had not uttered a word in reply to the fellow's abuse, but had stood quite dumb before him. The sense of danger, however, at once roused me to action. 'Hark ye, Mr. Fitzsimons,' said I; 'I will tell you why I was obliged to alter my name: which is Barry, and the best name in Ireland. I changed it, sir, because, on the day before I came to Dublin, I killed a man in deadly combat—an Englishman, sir, and a captain in His ...
— Barry Lyndon • William Makepeace Thackeray

... And you'll never guess who 'tis! Hark! They're coming! She was hobbling this way as I passed, little dreaming that her evil deeds would find her out so soon! The half o' Salem must be at her ...
— Patriotic Plays and Pageants for Young People • Constance D'Arcy Mackay

... pink fingers of morning began to spread themselves over the face of the sky, pinching its cheeks into a rosy red. Suddenly Fronto, who was on his knees with his back to the door of his cell, started. Hark! what sound was that which came floating on the fresh morning air? Surely, the tinkle of a bell. The good Saint rose from his mat and went hastily to the door, his sure hope sending a smile to his pale lips and color to his hollow cheek. He knew that his prayer was answered. And ...
— The Book of Saints and Friendly Beasts • Abbie Farwell Brown

... is fit for play: Let Love find his mate to-day: Hark, the birds, how sweet their lay! Love rules young men wholly; Love lures maidens solely. Woe to old folk! sad are they. Sweetest woman ever seen, Fairest, dearest, is my queen; And ...
— Wine, Women, and Song - Mediaeval Latin Students' songs; Now first translated into English verse • Various

... student of the College, who has nothing in his appearance to call attention. But this is Burton, by some accounted a morose person, but by those who knew him intimately a cheery and witty companion. Here, too, with slow and faltering step comes Pusey in extreme old age, and Liddon of ascetic mien. Hark to the laughter! It is Stubbs—historian Bishop—with witty saying falling from his lips. And there is Liddell, feared of the undergraduate, but splendid both in figure and in face. And many another shade would fancy depict taking the ...
— Oxford • Frederick Douglas How

... reasoned myself into some degree of temper again. However, I could not forbear crying out, "What, nobody to converse with! Nobody to assist, comfort, or counsel me! This is a melancholy situation indeed." Thus I ran on lamenting till I was almost weary, when on a sudden I again heard the voices. "Hark!" says I, "here they come again. Well, I am now resolved to face them, come life, come death! It is not to be alone I thus dread; but to have company about me, and not know who or what, is death ...
— Life And Adventures Of Peter Wilkins, Vol. I. (of II.) • Robert Paltock

... naught unless perchance a service rendered when a boy—a simple service, merely that of saving life—hath rendered him the touchy fool he is. But hark! ...
— The Days of Bruce Vol 1 - A Story from Scottish History • Grace Aguilar

... Hark! the mazurka. In times past, When the mazurka used to peal, All rattled in the ball-room vast, The parquet cracked beneath the heel, And jolting jarred the window-frames. 'Tis not so now. Like gentle dames We glide along ...
— Eugene Oneguine [Onegin] - A Romance of Russian Life in Verse • Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin

... I'd like to know where that fellow is," I replied. "Likely as not he is prowling about here somewhere. If we can only catch sight of him, we can— Hark!" ...
— True to Himself • Edward Stratemeyer

... confirm his former notion of the wisdom and power of omnipotence? Do I not teach him by these, and the other pursuits which have been mentioned, that all recreations should be innocent, and that time should be wisely employed? But hark! another amusement, and one of those which are followed out of doors, is at hand. The hounds are in view, and fast approaching. My son is accidentally solicited to join them. He would ask my permission, but I am absent. At length he goes. He follows them in wild tumult ...
— A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume III (of 3) • Thomas Clarkson

... "Hark tae him, Marr; hark tae him—a stag. Ho, ho, ho! He would tear a man's throat oot at his first leap," and man and dog rumbled and growled in devilish mirth. "Sing tae me, dog—sing," and the man threw his head up, and there came the long greeting howl of a dog baying the moon, ...
— The McBrides - A Romance of Arran • John Sillars

... And hark! Do you not hear in the distance the squeak of Puncinello? Ah! why have we none of this happy carelessness in England?—we who take our pleasures moult tristement—why have we not this lightheartedness, this camaraderie of enjoyment? Why cannot we throw aside our insular ...
— Without Prejudice • Israel Zangwill

... hunting troop is ready. Hark, through hills and valleys all Sounds the horn, the falcon loosened straight ascends to Odin's hall; Forest denizens in terror haste to seek their cavern-homes; But, with spear outstretched before ...
— Fridthjof's Saga • Esaias Tegner

... "Hark!" said I, when I had done my stirring, and was taking a final warm in the chimney corner before being sent up to bed; ...
— Great Expectations • Charles Dickens

... Hark thou, my Lesbia, there be none existent Can truly say she hath been loved by me As thou hast been. No faith is more consistent Than that which V. Catullus gives ...
— Tobogganing On Parnassus • Franklin P. Adams

... execootin ballids, accompanyin herself with the Akordeon, and she wisht me to linger and hear her sing: "Hark I hear a angel singin, a angel now is onto ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 2 • Charles Farrar Browne

... 'em, Tayoga," he said. "You put a little dart squarely in their hearts, and they don't like it. But they can squirm as much as they please, we're out of their reach now. Hark, they're answering!" ...
— The Hunters of the Hills • Joseph Altsheler

... Hark now, and gather how the martial mood Stirs England's humblest hearts. Anon we'll trace Its heavings in the ...
— The Dynasts - An Epic-Drama Of The War With Napoleon, In Three Parts, - Nineteen Acts, And One Hundred And Thirty Scenes • Thomas Hardy

... waiting for this. I had known that the moment would come, and wondered a score of times that it took so long in coming. As unmarried men, Roddy, you and I are out of our depth here. But surely—I hark back to it—it must happen to one or other of every married couple to look across the table and realise the words Till death us do part. When it happens to both simultaneously I suppose murder follows; or, at ...
— Foe-Farrell • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... she answered kindly. "I have always loved a jest, and I have no wish to grow old and grave before my time, even if I have the care of a whole Castle on my shoulders. But hark, there be the stranger's trumpets sounding before the gate. See to it that Walter Brand listens to his message, and answers it as befits the dignity of our house: and thou, do thou mount to thy watch-tower, and keep a good ...
— Tales From Scottish Ballads • Elizabeth W. Grierson

... worse for us, then. I never thought Mr. Hume would have knuckled down so easily. Hark at him shouting ...
— In Search of the Okapi - A Story of Adventure in Central Africa • Ernest Glanville

... tablet will be needed to bring home to your mind the fact that you are actually face to face with the house in which Schubert, the composer of those beautiful songs, 'The Erl King,' 'Hark, hark, the Lark,' and 'Sylvia,' first saw the light. And as you stand before the home of the great song-writer your thoughts will revert in fancy to the time when, a century ago, there issued from that doorway the figure of a boy of eleven years of age, clad in a suit of grey so light as to be ...
— Story-Lives of Great Musicians • Francis Jameson Rowbotham

... "Hark—it's raining!" Rosemary had heard the sound of drops on the tin roof of the porch "I'm coming down with you, Winnie—wouldn't it be nice if only Hugh ...
— Rainbow Hill • Josephine Lawrence

... Hark the glad sound! the Savior comes— The Savior promised long; Let every heart prepare a throne, ...
— The Otterbein Hymnal - For Use in Public and Social Worship • Edmund S. Lorenz

... "Hark at her now!" said Specklems, "not a singer; why, what does she call that?" And then the vain little bird whistled and sputtered and cizzled away till he was quite out of breath, when his wife laughed at him so merrily, but told him that she liked his whistle better than the finest trill the ...
— Featherland - How the Birds lived at Greenlawn • George Manville Fenn

... of a first-class character from both God and the agent of the devil. Hark to the Savior indulging in an outburst of exquisite sarcasm, "What think ye of John? A reed shaken by the wind? A man clothed in soft raiment?" A Chocolate Christian? (How delicious! The Chocolates were right in front ...
— The Chocolate Soldier - Heroism—The Lost Chord of Christianity • C. T. Studd

... that a woman can look on him with love, though his heart—augh!—I wouldn't have his heart for his lands, no, nor for his fine person either. Barbara can't abide him; she always says he has a black look—and so he has. But hark! there's knocking at the gate, and loud knocking too—Sir Willmott, as the servants can't hear, so can't answer, shall I ...
— The Buccaneer - A Tale • Mrs. S. C. Hall

... Hark! here the sound of lute so sweet, And there the voice of wailing loud; Here scholars grave in conclave meet, There howls the brawling drunken crowd; Here, charming maidens full of glee, There, tottering, withered dames we see. Such light! Such shade! ...
— Book of Wise Sayings - Selected Largely from Eastern Sources • W. A. Clouston

... why do deaf men generally keep their mouths open? The other day a man here was mimicking a deaf friend, leaning his head forward and sideways to the speaker, with his mouth well open; it was a lifelike representation of a deaf man. Shakespeare somewhere says: "Hold your breath, listen" or "hark," I forget which. Surprise hurries the breath, and it seems to me one can breathe, at least hurriedly, much quieter through the open mouth than through the nose. I saw the other day you doubted this. As objection is your province at present, I think ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume II • Francis Darwin

... madam," said Mr Tankardew; "I shall sleep at the 'Wheatsheaf' to-night, and will take care to send a trusty messenger over to 'The Shrubbery' to tell them how matters stand; and Mr Hodges will, I am sure, drive you over in his gig in the morning. Hark how the rain comes down! You really must stop: Mrs Hodges will make ...
— Nearly Lost but Dearly Won • Theodore P. Wilson

... Hark! the war-song, the Ingomo, the music of which has the power to drive men mad, rose far away to the left, and was thrown along from regiment to ...
— Nada the Lily • H. Rider Haggard

... "But hark! the bells are beginning to chime;... For the bells themselves are the best of preachers; Their brazen lips are learned teachers, From their pulpits of stone, in the upper air, Sounding aloft, without ...
— Bay State Monthly, Volume I, No. 2, February, 1884 - A Massachusetts Magazine • Various

... believe me. Well, I invite you to come and see me there, three months hence, and if you like pastorals, we'll do one together. Now, au revoir! I leave you with Joseph, and, in spite of your refusal, I shall expect you at the Tuileries. Hark! ...
— The Companions of Jehu • Alexandre Dumas, pere

... strength, and seated himself again, in his own place. Then still more men fell down, one after the other; they brought nine dead men's legs and two skulls, and set them up and played at ninepins with them. The youth also wanted to play and said: "Hark you, can I join you?" "Yes, if thou hast any money." "Money enough," replied he, "but your balls are not quite round." Then he took the skulls and put them in the lathe and turned them till they were ...
— The Junior Classics, Volume 1 • Willam Patten

... so't he could see the sights of his power, and glorify him among men, and then Enraghty he commenced to git warm ag'in, and Dylks he turned up his eyes and kep' still, and it was so bright all round him that it made the daylight like dusk, and Dylks made him hark if he didn't hear a kind of rush in the air, and Dylks said it was the adversary of souls, but he would conquer him. They came into a deep holler in the woods and there they see the devil standun' in their way, and Dylks he lights and ...
— The Leatherwood God • William Dean Howells

... Captain, seizing both her wrists, "hark you, Mrs. Frog, you'd best hold your tongue; for I must make bold to tell you, if you don't, that I shall make no ceremony of tripping you out of the window, and there you may lie in the mud till some of your Monseers come to help you out ...
— Evelina • Fanny Burney

... the stable; just at the door stood Samson. I laid my ears back and snapped at him. 'Stand back,' said the master, 'and keep out of her way; you've done a bad day's work for this filly.' He growled out something about a vicious brute. 'Hark ye,' said the father, 'a bad-tempered man will never make a good-tempered horse. You've not learned your trade yet, Samson.' Then he led me into my box, took off the saddle and bridle with his own hands, and tied me up; then he ...
— Black Beauty • Anna Sewell

... "Hark ye, Jack," said his pal Basalt, "we've bin an' made hasses of ourselves in getting that chap aboard, but our dooty ...
— Jack Harkaway and his son's Escape From the Brigand's of Greece • Bracebridge Hemyng

... "Hark! The herald angels sing, Beecham's Pills are just the thing; Peace on earth and mercy mild, Two for man and ...
— Modern Eloquence: Vol III, After-Dinner Speeches P-Z • Various

... Hodgson[3], we are going, Our embargo's off at last; Favourable breezes blowing Bend the canvas o'er the mast. From aloft the signal's streaming, Hark! the farewell gun is fired; Women screeching, tars blaspheming, Tell us that our time's expired. Here's a rascal Come to task all, Prying from the Custom-house; Trunks unpacking Cases cracking, Not a corner for a mouse Scapes unsearched ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Vol. 7. - Poetry • George Gordon Byron

... Hark to the beating drum! See how the people come! Flag in the van! We follow, man for man. Rouse, rouse From earth and house! Ye women and children, good night! Forth we hasten, we hasten to the fight, With God ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 57, July, 1862 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... loud upon roof and window-pane, As if the Wild Huntsman of Rodenstein, Boding evil to me and mine, Were abroad to-night with his ghostly train! In the brief lulls of the tempest wild, The dogs howl in the yard; and hark! Some one is sobbing in the dark, Here ...
— The Golden Legend • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... will hark back now to the night before last, when Reginald Henson made his personal attempt to obtain the Rembrandt and then played the trick upon you that was so very near to being ...
— The Crimson Blind • Fred M. White

... Hark! What noise was that under the drooping curtain of nets? Now she does not hear it; but presently it comes again—a soft, happy little baby voice, cooing and ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, May, 1878, No. 7. - Scribner's Illustrated • Various

... on the ledge, when hark! the sound of a distant gun. To Zuleika, with all the chords of her soul strung to the utmost tensity, the effect was as if she herself had been shot; and she clutched at the Duke's arm, like a frightened child. He laughed. ...
— Zuleika Dobson - or, An Oxford Love Story • Max Beerbohm

... forwards: hark, honest Ned, good-morrow to you; how dost, Master Mayor? What, you are driving it about merrily this morning? Come, come, sit down; the squire and I will take a pot with you. Come, Mr Mayor, here's—liberty and property and ...
— Miscellanies, Volume 2 (from Works, Volume 12) • Henry Fielding

... "Hark to the wind in the wood without! I laugh in my bed while I hear him roar, Blustering, bellowing, shout after shout,— What do you want, O wind, ...
— The Unknown Quantity - A Book of Romance and Some Half-Told Tales • Henry van Dyke

... Hark to the music of the shuttle and the useful loom. We weave linen, cotton, woolen, linsey-woolsey, and, not to be behind the rogues outside, cottonsey-woolsey and cottonsey-silksey; damask we weave, and a little silk and poplin, and Mary Baker velvet itself for a treat now and ...
— It Is Never Too Late to Mend • Charles Reade

... beginning, or the real novel readers will not like it. The plan of jumping at once into the middle has been often tried, and sometimes seductively enough for a chapter or two; but the writer still has to hark back, and to begin again from the beginning,—not always very comfortably after the abnormal brightness of his few opening pages; and the reader who is then involved in some ancient family history, or long local explanation, feels himself to have been defrauded. It is as though one ...
— Is He Popenjoy? • Anthony Trollope

... his matin lay, The waking flowers at dawning day, With perfumed breath, sigh, Come! come! come! Oh, haste, Love, come with me, To the wild wood come with me. Hark, the wing'd warblers singing, Come with me; Beauteous flowers, their ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume VI - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... vengeance strikes,—hark to the gale! As it bursts hollow through the rolling clouds. Such ...
— Eventide - A Series of Tales and Poems • Effie Afton

... Hark! there arises over there in the brush a soft persuasive cooing, a sound so subtle and wild and unobtrusive that it requires the most alert and watchful ear to hear it. How gentle and solicitous and full of yearning love! It is the ...
— Wake-Robin • John Burroughs

... and scarce awake, Out in the trench with three hours' watch to take, I blunder through the splashing mirk; and then Hear the gruff muttering voices of the men Crouching in cabins candle-chinked with light. Hark! There's the big bombardment on our right Rumbling and bumping; and the dark's a glare Of flickering horror in the sectors where We raid the Boche; men waiting, stiff and chilled, Or crawling on their bellies through the wire. "What? Stretcher-bearers wanted? ...
— Counter-Attack and Other Poems • Siegfried Sassoon

... else, Ganem, fill me with a mighty fear— Hark not to that, hear me! hear me, I beg thee! Hear me, that here beneath thy glance am lying With open soul, whose ebb and flow of blood Proceeds but from the changes of thy mien. Thou once didst love me—that, I think, is past— For what came then, I only am to blame: ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... moving. Hark to the mingled din Of fife, and steed, and trump, and drum, and roaring culverin. The fiery duke is pricking fast across Saint Andre's plain, With all the hireling chivalry of Guelders and Almayne. Now by the lips of those ye love, fair gentlemen of France, Charge for ...
— The Canadian Elocutionist • Anna Kelsey Howard

... and they were about to turn back, when—hark! there was a shout from the borders of the canon beyond. A few moments before, Abe, the old scout, had disappeared in that direction. As he pressed onward he presently discovered that, in a wavering line, the brambles seemed to have been recently trodden down. A little ...
— Apples, Ripe and Rosy, Sir • Mary Catherine Crowley

... accents to low music as is the custom of vaudeville—"scene represents the young Lawrenceville boy, exhausted by the preparation of the next day's lessons, seeking to rest his too conscientious brain. The night passes, the wind rises. It grows cold. Hark the rising bell. He hears it not. What now? He rises in his bed, the room is bitter cold. He bounds to the window over the frozen ground. He springs to the register and back to his bed. He looks at his watch. Heavens! ...
— The Varmint • Owen Johnson

... stammered. And then, quite suddenly, I stopped short, and listened. "Hark, Fra Gervasio! ...
— The Strolling Saint • Raphael Sabatini

... for a satisfactory right and left at two cock pheasants, which they had hunted down to the very edge of the water before they could persuade them to take wing. Now for that little alder coppice at the further end of the marshy swamp. Hark to that whipping sound so different from the rush of the rising pheasant or the drumming flight of the partridge! I cannot see the bird, but I know it is a woodcock. This must be one of his favourite haunts, for I perceive the tracks of his feet and the perforations of his bill in every direction ...
— Highways & Byways in Sussex • E.V. Lucas

... back, and pulled her down quicker." There was something in the sound of that laugh, which seemed to Katy like an echo of the past. "But," thought she, "I'm deaf like and mebby didn't hear straight. I'll go to the kitchen agin and hark." ...
— Tempest and Sunshine • Mary J. Holmes

... right. But I don't want my part taken out of the tree of life jest yet. I ain't aimin' to show myself none. Hark!" ...
— The Lions of the Lord - A Tale of the Old West • Harry Leon Wilson

... clouds had sunk lower and they must open before long. If only day were near at hand, then he might choose the right course. Hark! Did he not hear hoof beats? He paused in doubt, and then lay down with his ear to the earth. Then he distinctly heard the sound, the regular tread of a horse, urged forward in a straight course, and he knew that it could be made only by the Sioux. But the sound indicated ...
— The Last of the Chiefs - A Story of the Great Sioux War • Joseph Altsheler

... now, how the rattling waxeth till he may not heed nor hark! And the day and the heavens are hidden, and o'er Sigurd rolls the dark, As the flood of a pitchy river, and heavy-thick is the air With the venom of hate long hoarded, and lies once fashioned fair: Then a wan face ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs • William Morris

... hark how the wind goes, the wind goes (And dark goes the stream by the mill!) Oh, see where the storm blows, the storm blows (There's a ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... man, physically and mentally, is the atmosphere we have been breathing so long! The miasma of the swamp, the simoom of the desert, the merciless sirocco, are healthful when compared to such an atmosphere. And, hark! what formidable being is that who, with black expanded wings, flies about from place to place, and from person to person, with a cup of fire in his hands, which he applies to their eager lips? And what spell or charm lies in ...
— Phelim O'toole's Courtship and Other Stories • William Carleton

... that he suffered himself to be so taken by a woman—"You are deceived, signore," says Castruccio, "she is taken by me." Another desiring a favour of him with a thousand impertinent and superfluous words—"Hark you, friend," says Castruccio, "when you would have anything of me, for the future send another man to ask it." Something of his dream of dominion may be found in that saying of his when one asked him, seeing his ambition, how Caesar died, and he ...
— Florence and Northern Tuscany with Genoa • Edward Hutton

... Hark now to me, and silence keep, And we will talk about the sheep; For sheep are harmless, and we know That on their backs ...
— The Infant System - For Developing the Intellectual and Moral Powers of all Children, - from One to Seven years of Age • Samuel Wilderspin

... you ever know me to have anybody waked up in the whole course of my life? Powers, and the rest of you, hark ye: Let no one call Mr. Worth. Let him sleep until the last trump sounds, or until he wakes up of his ...
— Ishmael - In the Depths • Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth

... I care which," is the rejoinder of the giant. "Eyther'll do; an' one o' 'em 'ud be more nor surficient, ef 't war left ter Walt Wilder. But, hark'ee, Frank!" he continues, his face assuming an astute expression, "I'd like to be sure 'bout the thing now—that is, to get the gurl's way o' thinking on 't. Fact is, I've made up my mind to be sure, so as thar may be no ...
— The Lone Ranche • Captain Mayne Reid

... for Miss Todd's party. Assist me, my muse. Come down from heaven, O, Calliope my queen! and aid me to spin with my pen a long discourse. Hark! do you hear? or does some fond delusion mock me? I seem to hear, and to be already wandering through those sacred recesses—the drawing-rooms, namely, at Littlebath—which are pervious only to the streams and breezes of ...
— The Bertrams • Anthony Trollope

... hark to young folk! I am for good acts, not good looks. Loves she my boy as he did ought ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... isolation is over. To attempt to return to it would be a mere pernicious day-dream. To hark back to Washington's warning against entangling alliances is as sensible as to go by a map of the world made in 1796. We are coupled to the company of nations like a car in the middle of a train, only more ...
— A Straight Deal - or The Ancient Grudge • Owen Wister

... gone. Agendath is a waste land, a home of screechowls and the sandblind upupa. Netaim, the golden, is no more. And on the highway of the clouds they come, muttering thunder of rebellion, the ghosts of beasts. Huuh! Hark! Huuh! Parallax stalks behind and goads them, the lancinating lightnings of whose brow are scorpions. Elk and yak, the bulls of Bashan and of Babylon, mammoth and mastodon, they come trooping to the sunken sea, Lacus Mortis. Ominous ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... hark! the dogs do bark, Beggars are coming to town, Some in jags, and some in rags, And some ...
— Traditional Nursery Songs of England - With Pictures by Eminent Modern Artists • Various

... I am morbid!" replied the artist. "My mind has a twist aside, like almost everybody's mind, except your own. Moreover, it is so strange to find myself an inmate of this old Pyncheon House, and sitting in this old garden—(hark, how Maule's well is murmuring!)—that, were it only for this one circumstance, I cannot help fancying that Destiny is arranging its fifth act for ...
— The House of the Seven Gables • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... of this jail? Now hark to that. You might as well try to move a mountain; and look at you lying there scarce able to move yourself, ...
— It Is Never Too Late to Mend • Charles Reade

... and clear, Hark to the call of War! Over the gorse and the golden dells, Ringing and swinging of clamorous bells, Praying and saying of ...
— Rhymes of a Red Cross Man • Robert W. Service

... Hark you! from yonder Sabine farm Echo the songs of long ago, With power to soothe and grace to charm What ills humanity may know; With that sweet music in the air, 'T ...
— Echoes from the Sabine Farm • Roswell Martin Field and Eugene Field

... Hark! blares the tyrant's horn and, in a thrice, The Tories gather. Eagerly they band, For is the King not greater than the land? And rows with royalty, a rabble's vice? Besides, what creeping tribes at his command, And Spies and Hessians ...
— Freedom, Truth and Beauty • Edward Doyle

... the cushions and rest thee," she answered, still holding my hand, from which the strength had fled. "The fit will surely pass. Too long hast thou laboured with thy stars. How soft is the night air that flows from yonder casement heavy with the breath of lilies! Hark to the whisper of the sea lapping against the rocks, that, though it is faint, yet, being so strong, doth almost drown the quick cool fall of yonder fountain. List to Philomel; how sweet from a full heart of ...
— Cleopatra • H. Rider Haggard

... that might sour the ripest grapes in Chios," rejoined Eudora. "The comic writers are over-jealous of Aspasia's preference to the tragic poets; and I suppose she permitted this visit to bribe his enmity; as ghosts are said to pacify Cerberus with a cake. But hark! I hear Geta unlocking the outer gate. Phidias has returned; and he likes to have no lamp burn later than his own. We must quickly prepare for rest; though I am as wakeful as ...
— Philothea - A Grecian Romance • Lydia Maria Child

... Hark! and list the bridal song, As they lead the bride along: "Hear, gentle bride! your mother's sighs, And you would hence away! Weep, weep, for tears become ...
— Jasmin: Barber, Poet, Philanthropist • Samuel Smiles

... too late. Side by side with the peace of night, there dwell Spirits of Evil, the never-resting, vagrant, home-destroying guests, who enter unbidden into the human soul! Hark, the rustling of their raven-hued plumage! They take wing, they fly aloft; 't is the shriek of the vulture, swooping down upon the ...
— A Ghetto Violet - From "Christian and Leah" • Leopold Kompert

... of the boar in the jungle, coming straight up the hill toward the spot where I was standing; and, fearing that he might top the ridge and make down the other side toward Dimboola, I gave him a halloo to head him back. Hark, for-r-rard to him! yo-o-ick! ...
— Eight Years' Wandering in Ceylon • Samuel White Baker

... discussing all the details of the rescue they heard a woman's pitiful lament and the crying of little children. "Hark!" said Cloudeslee, and they all heard in the silence the words she said. It was William's wife, and she cried: "Alas! why did I not die before this day? Woe is me that my dear husband is slain! He is dead, and ...
— Hero-Myths & Legends of the British Race • Maud Isabel Ebbutt

... told to drive back for you. It's some one seeking shelter, like ourselves. Hark—the hail is stopping, and now the thunder and lightning and a good ...
— Ringfield - A Novel • Susie Frances Harrison

... hark! and hark! a knock—Tap! tap A rustling stifled noise; Door-latch and tinkling staples ring; At length a ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 7 • Various

... "Hark, Calvert, what is that?" asked Trusia apprehensively. He bent his head fearfully toward the forest. Shouts, the crackling of fallen twigs, cheers and commands in Russian, greeted ...
— Trusia - A Princess of Krovitch • Davis Brinton

... Marcian, with a forced laugh, 'you need have no fear. But, hark you!' He hesitated, again searching the man's countenance. 'You might chance to meet some friend of mine who would inquire after me. No matter who it be—were it even the lord Basil—you will answer in the same words, saying that I am still in Rome. You understand me? Were it ...
— Veranilda • George Gissing

... now the bustling scene is o'er, The weary actor struts no more; And hark, "The old man needed rest," They cry; ...
— Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 366, April, 1846 • Various

... locked upon him, he called aloud, "Hilloa! doctor, hip—another word, d'ye see." They forthwith returned to know what he wanted, and found him already in a sweat. "Hark ye, brother," said he, wiping his face, "I do suppose as how one may pass away the time in whistling the Black Joke, or singing Black-eyed Susan, or some such sorrowful ditty."—"By no means," cried the doctor; "such pastimes are neither suitable to the ...
— The Adventures of Sir Launcelot Greaves • Tobias Smollett

... is again upon us, and with the gentle fall of the autumn leaf and the sough of the scented breezes about the gnarled and naked limbs of the wailing trees—the huntsman comes with his hark and his halloo and hurrah, boys, the swift rush of the chase, the thrilling scamper 'cross country, the mad dash through the Long Islander's pumpkin patch—also the mad dash, dash, dash of the farmer, the low moan of the disabled and frozen-toed hen as the whooping horsemen run her down; the wild ...
— Nye and Riley's Wit and Humor (Poems and Yarns) • Bill Nye

... hands. "He has it I believe," he muttered. "Hark in your ear, Boyce. If this is your work, I'll see you ...
— The Highwayman • H.C. Bailey

... his wing In the briar'd dell below; Hark! the death-owl loud doth sing, To the night-mares ...
— Halleck's New English Literature • Reuben P. Halleck

... feel as if I had a sick wolf pacing his cage up there in the gallery, right over my head. [Listens and whispers.] Hark! Do you hear! Backwards and forwards, up and down, goes ...
— John Gabriel Borkman • Henrik Ibsen

... borrowed clothes. I'm a common sailor, and I wear the common sailor's clothes. You've earned your uniform, and it suits you. Stick to it; and when I've earned a captain's uniform I'll wear it. I owe you the success of this voyage so far, and my heart is full of it, up to the brim. Hark, what's that?" ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... And hark! like the roar of the billows on the shore, The cry of battle rises along their charging line! For God! for the Cause! for the Church! for the Laws! For Charles King of England ...
— The Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches of Lord Macaulay, Vol. 3. (of 4) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... of the wood-pigeon sounded on the right. The padre smiled as he looked up. "That is a favorable omen," he declared. "In the religion of the river-dwellers, the Bagobos, when the wood-dove calls, it is the voice of God. Hark! It is coming from the right. It is a favorable sign, and we can go upon our journey undisturbed. But had we heard it on the left, it would have been to us a warning to turn back. Our journey then would have been unpropitious, and we would have been afraid ...
— The Great White Tribe in Filipinia • Paul T. Gilbert

... the forest hurries the Wehr-Wolf—impelled, lashed on by an invincible scourge, and filling the woods with its appalling yells—while its mouth scatters foam like thick flakes of snow. Hark, there is an ominous rustling in one of the trees of the forest; and the monster seems to instinctively know the danger which menaces it. But still its course is not changed;—it seems not to exercise its own will in shaping its course. ...
— Wagner, the Wehr-Wolf • George W. M. Reynolds

... [leaning out, opposite] Right, neighbor, right well said!—Piper, hark here. Piper, how did ye charm ...
— The Piper • Josephine Preston Peabody

... guide; she had brought me out of the depth of elf-land into the material world again. It had been a singular adventure, certainly; and I mused over it with a sense of mysterious pleasure as I sauntered along, humming snatches of airs, and accompanying myself on the strings. Hark! what light step was that behind me? It sounded like Elsie's; but no, Elsie was not there. The same impression or hallucination, however, recurred several times before I reached the outskirts of the town—the tread of an airy foot behind or beside my own. The fancy did not make me nervous; on ...
— David Poindexter's Disappearance and Other Tales • Julian Hawthorne

... "Hark to the man! And when 'tis settled she shall have the nest, he looks for all the world as though she had ...
— The Moon out of Reach • Margaret Pedler

... Hark! what was that? Surely the clock was striking again. No, it was a different sound and came from the front-door. Some person was evidently trying to open it. Ruth's heart stood still. All the terrible stories she had ever heard ...
— Ruth Arnold - or, the Country Cousin • Lucy Byerley

... "Hark! Hark! The Lark!" shouted Todd as he rowed past with Babette Gold. "Only there isn't a lark or any other bird in these woods that I've ...
— Black Oxen • Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton

... to say for herself, That is the fault you find! Hark to her words to the children, Cheery ...
— Stray Thoughts for Girls • Lucy H. M. Soulsby

... soon find whether I tell the truth or no," observed Quicksilver. "Hark! hush! hist! ...
— Myths and Legends of All Nations • Various

... us hark back to southern Asia with its two reservoirs of life, India and China, and between them a jutting promontory pointing the way to the Indonesian archipelago, and thence onward farther still to the wide-flung Austral region with its myriad ...
— Anthropology • Robert Marett

... may be. But it's made a wise man of me, Flask. D'ye see Ahab standing there, sideways looking over the stern? Well, the best thing you can do, Flask, is to let the old man alone; never speak to him, whatever he says. Halloa! What's that he shouts? Hark!" ...
— Moby Dick; or The Whale • Herman Melville

... scanty population, like Switzerland; or a new nation, like America; but it would be a calamity to our old France: we are too volatile, too impassioned; we want a ruler, a master who knows how to make himself obeyed. Hark you, M. Werner, I must continue to speak to you frankly: the only chief, that suits us, is Napoleon: no longer Napoleon the ambitious and the conqueror, but Napoleon corrected by adversity. The desire of reigning will render him docile to the will of France, and of Europe. ...
— Memoirs of the Private Life, Return, and Reign of Napoleon in 1815, Vol. II • Pierre Antoine Edouard Fleury de Chaboulon

... sightless guest? Or haply now we see fulfilled What fate long time hath willed? For ne'er have I proved vain Aught that the heavenly powers ordain. Time with never sleeping eye Watches what is writ on high, Overthrowing now the great, Raising now from low estate. Hark! How the thunder rumbles! Zeus ...
— The Oedipus Trilogy • Sophocles

... over the stern, and slide down by that rope into the little boat that floats there. Take one of the oars, which you will find muffled, and scull to the shore and bring off Thorwald and his men. And, hark 'ee, boy, bring off my shirt and boots. Now, look alive; your friend Henry Stuart's ...
— Gascoyne, the Sandal-Wood Trader • R.M. Ballantyne

... "Hark ye, mister Gold-coast," muttered the white, bending his head aside in a threatening manner, though he still disdained to turn his eyes on his humble adversary, "if you've no wish to wear your shins parcelled for the next ...
— The Red Rover • James Fenimore Cooper

... don't have to hark back to Switzerland and Holland for cheese memories. Here at home we have increasingly taken over the cheeses of all nations, first importing them, then imitating them, from Swiss Engadine to what we call Genuine Sprinz. We've naturalized ...
— The Complete Book of Cheese • Robert Carlton Brown

... up, Xarifa! Only three grains of corn! Stay, Lady, stay! for mercy's sake! and wind the bugle horn. The glittering knife descends—descends—Hark, hark, the foeman's cry! The world is all a fleeting show! Said Gilpin, ...
— Marjorie at Seacote • Carolyn Wells

... was spent in giving out the vast treasures of melody with which he had been so richly endowed. These flowed from his pen in a constant stream, one beautiful work after another. He wrote them down wherever he happened to be and when a scrap of paper could be had. The exquisite song "Hark, Hark the Lark" was jotted down on the back of a bill of fare, in a beer garden. The beautiful works which he produced day after day brought him little or no money, perhaps because he was so modest and retiring, modestly undervaluing everything he ...
— The World's Great Men of Music - Story-Lives of Master Musicians • Harriette Brower

... at ease of all the poor mothers who are mourning for their sons.' Whereupon, the door being opened, came in so piteous a sound of wailing and lamentation as our Harry's name must have been Herod to withstand! 'Stand up, Kate,' said he, 'stand up, sisters, and hark in your ear. Not a hair of the silly lads shall be touched, but they must bide lock and key long enough to teach them and their masters to keep better ward.' And then when the queens came back with the good tidings, such a storm of blessings was never heard, laughings and cryings, ...
— The Armourer's Prentices • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... the shivering air, Arrests her foot on the cottage stair, Instinctive taught by the mother-love, And thinks of the sleeping ones above. Why start the listeners? Why does the course Of the mill-stream widen? Is it a horse— Hark to the sound of his hoofs, they say— That gallops so wildly Williamsburg way! God! what was that, like a human shriek From the winding valley? Will nobody speak? Will nobody answer those women who cry As ...
— Voices for the Speechless • Abraham Firth

... grave affability, "I 'speck not. One man, one tale; 'n'er man, 'n'er tale. Folks tell um diffunt. I boun' yo' way de bes', Brer Jack. Out wid it—en we ull set up yer, en hark at you en laff wid you ...
— Nights With Uncle Remus - Myths and Legends of the Old Plantation • Joel Chandler Harris

... "Hark! awake not my Urbain; he sleeps there in the next room. Ay, my hair is indeed wet, and my feet—see, my feet that were once so white, see how the mud has soiled them. But I have made a vow—I will not wash them till I have seen the King, and until he has granted me Urbain's pardon. I am going ...
— Cinq Mars, Complete • Alfred de Vigny

... Come buy—come buy?— (Hark! how the sweet things sigh For they have a voice like ours), 'The breath of the blind girl closes The leaves of the saddening roses— We are tender, we sons of light, We shrink from this child ...
— The Last Days of Pompeii • Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

... stoned, not ye who have smitten us," cry The sad, great souls, as they go out hence into dark, "Not ye we accuse, though for you was our passion borne; And ye we reproach not, who silently passed us by. We forgive blind eyes and the ears that would not hark, The careless and causeless hate and ...
— Ride to the Lady • Helen Gray Cone

... said, when Aaron had ended, and had secured his piece of cake again. "There's no other music equil to the Christmas music—"Hark the erol angils sing." And you may judge what it is at church, Master Marner, with the bassoon and the voices, as you can't help thinking you've got to a better place a'ready—for I wouldn't speak ill o' this world, seeing as Them put us in it as knows best—but what wi' the ...
— Silas Marner - The Weaver of Raveloe • George Eliot



Words linked to "Hark" :   harken, hearken



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