Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'



Don   Listen
noun
Don  n.  
1.
Sir; Mr; Signior; a title in Spain, formerly given to noblemen and gentlemen only, but now common to all classes. "Don is used in Italy, though not so much as in Spain. France talks of Dom Calmet, England of Dan Lydgate."
2.
A grand personage, or one making pretension to consequence; especially, the head of a college, or one of the fellows at the English universities. (Univ. Cant) "The great dons of wit."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Don" Quotes from Famous Books



... papa!" said Ursula, delighted. "Oh, how good of you! You don't mind—you really don't mind? Oh! I can't tell you how thankful I am; for to pretend to want to be friends, and then to break off all in a moment ...
— Phoebe, Junior • Mrs [Margaret] Oliphant

... which seemed to have nothing to do, and certainly were not assailing the coast defences. Some of the seaward forts were able to get their guns to bear on the positions of the Japanese armies, and were blazing away, though I don't think they ...
— Under the Dragon Flag - My Experiences in the Chino-Japanese War • James Allan

... in Philadelphia, he cried out, "Father Abraham, who have you got in heaven; any Episcopalians?" "No!" "Any Presbyterians?" "No!" "Any Baptists?" "No!" "Have you any Methodists there?" "No!" "Have you any Independents or Seceders?" "No! No!" "Why, who have you, then?" "We don't know those names here; all that are here are Christians—believers in Christ—men who have overcome by the blood of the Lamb, and the word of his testimony!" "O, is this the case? then God help me—God help us all—to forget party names, and to become ...
— The Book of Religions • John Hayward

... she said. "I don't wonder you are exercised about it. Are there no extenuating circumstances?" Miss Wellington appeared duly shocked; yet, being a woman of an alert and cheery disposition, she reached out instinctively for some palliative ...
— The Law-Breakers and Other Stories • Robert Grant

... earnestly, "won't you clear your mind of everything except just truth? You don't owe me anything. ...
— The Enchanted April • Elizabeth von Arnim

... have a doctor," whispered the man hoarsely. "If not, I'll surely die. And I don't ...
— The Rover Boys in Camp - or, The Rivals of Pine Island • Edward Stratemeyer

... being now in the possession of the Santa Marinan nation, I beg that you will consider as your own the Island Queen and all it may contain," said Don Enrique to me with as magnificent an air as though the sand-filled hulk of a wrecked sloop were really a choice gift to bestow on ...
— Spanish Doubloons • Camilla Kenyon

... been persuaded to try the Semitic Languages Tripos. I have been learning German and Syriac a little this Long with that aim in view. . . . I don't really know what to do. I am trying to do what will best fit me for my future work. It is hard to ...
— Letters to His Friends • Forbes Robinson

... intriguing thing about Naval prize-money is the fact that no one knows exactly where it comes from. You don't win it by any definite act of superlative daring—I mean to say, you don't have to creep out under cover of darkness and return in the morning with an enemy battleship in tow to qualify for a modicum of this mysterious treasure. You just proceed serenely on ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 159, November 10, 1920 • Various

... "Don't believe that, Captain Yorke," I said, "but at the same time I wish you had not told us of this place. You certainly have the prior right of discovery, and ought to have the benefit, so I promise you I will not repeat to our owners anything you ...
— Yorke The Adventurer - 1901 • Louis Becke

... news, general, from Operation 'Hildegarde.' We ought to have at least one bomb ready to drop by 1500 tomorrow, four or five more by next midnight," he said. "We don't need to have cases cast. We got our dimensions decided, and we find that there are a lot of big empty liquid-oxygen flasks, or tanks, rather, at the spaceport, that'll accommodate everything—fissionables, explosive-charges, tampers, ...
— Uller Uprising • Henry Beam Piper, John D. Clark and John F. Carr

... the expression of a desire to resign. "The Courier of last night," he writes, "announces Mr. Huskisson's introduction into the Cabinet. Of the intention or the fact I have no other communication. Whether Lord Sidmouth has or not, I don't know, but really this is rather too much. Looking at the whole history of this gentleman, I don't consider this introduction, without a word said about the intention, as I should perhaps have done with respect to some persons that have been ...
— Memoirs of the Court of George IV. 1820-1830 (Vol 1) - From the Original Family Documents • Duke of Buckingham and Chandos

... I had invited him to do so), and to get him into the proposed Committee, if the matter be taken up in earnest. In the Committee of Revision Schmidt (the librarian) and Holz must not be forgotten. With regard to my humble self, I don't want to be put forward, but simply to take my place in alphabetical order; but please explain beforehand that I am ready to undertake any work which they may think fit to apportion to me. I likewise undertake to invite the Grand Duke of Weimar, ...
— Letters of Franz Liszt, Volume 1, "From Paris to Rome: - Years of Travel as a Virtuoso" • Franz Liszt; Letters assembled by La Mara and translated

... a second most interesting meeting on the steamer from Prague to Dresden, namely, with the widow of Professor Mikan. In the year 1817, this lady had, on the occasion of the marriage of the Austrian Princess Leopaldine with Don Pedro I., followed her husband to the Brazils, and afterwards made with him a scientific journey into the interior ...
— A Woman's Journey Round the World • Ida Pfeiffer

... "We don't need to define it. Pleasure and pain are simply sensations. If I cut my finger, I feel pain; if I drink when I am thirsty, I feel pleasure. There can be no mistake about these feelings; they are ...
— The Meaning of Good—A Dialogue • G. Lowes Dickinson

... on one. He saw the boy's confusion in his face, 40 Surprised at all the wonders of the place; And cries aloud, 'What wants my son? for know My son thou art, and I must call thee so.' 'Light of the world,' the trembling youth replies, 'Illustrious parent! since you don't despise The parent's name, some certain token give, That I may Clymene's proud boast believe, Nor longer under false reproaches grieve.' The tender sire was touched with what he said. And flung ...
— The Poetical Works of Addison; Gay's Fables; and Somerville's Chase • Joseph Addison, John Gay, William Sommerville

... breeds do, and some breeds don't, Some breeds will, but this breed won't: I tried very often to see if it would, But it said it really couldn't, and I ...
— Selections from Previous Works - and Remarks on Romanes' Mental Evolution in Animals • Samuel Butler

... so sorry!—Mamma is so sad! But Archie can make her look up and be glad: I've been praying to God, as you told me to do, That Papa may come back when the battle is thro':— He says when we pray, that our prayers shall be heard; And Mamma, don't you always know, God ...
— Beechenbrook - A Rhyme of the War • Margaret J. Preston

... for both of us. Oh! don't imagine you are dealing with a sot! No! never more than is good for ...
— An Antarctic Mystery • Jules Verne

... to be half angry but rejoiced at being able to say out what she was already longing to insinuate; "I don't believe a word of it. It's all indigestion. I remember staying in the house with her for a whole month last summer, and I am sure she never once touched a drop of wine or spirits. The fact is, Mahaina is a very weakly girl, and she pretends to get tipsy in order to win ...
— Erewhon • Samuel Butler

... site; it had before been owned and venerated by the heathen, and is today frequented by the Catholics, who find there relief for their needs. The city lies in the eastern part, and has a good port, while there are other ports found in the island. There, then, did the most pious bishop, Don Fray Pedro de Arce (of the order of our father St. Augustine, and a son of the most observant province of Castilla, and of the convent of Salamanca—where he professed in the year one thousand five hundred and seventy-nine, while father Fray Antonio Munoz was prior), ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume XXI, 1624 • Various

... of an hour?" Rees went on. "Nonsense! Try and do it in five minutes.—Yes, our whole stock. When you've got the message through, ring us up.—Where are we? Why, at Lord Dredlinton's house. Don't be longer than you can help. Put a different person on ...
— The Profiteers • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... The two brothers Don and Harry had gone to the station to see their father off and so the girls did not know their views as ...
— The Quest of Happy Hearts • Kathleen Hay

... and she raised her knife. Die or not, the thing was too incredible a farce to leave me unmoved. Yes, I laughed out of sheer delight. The drollery of this phantom hacking at Mallare with a non-existent dagger ... a mad windmill charging Don Quixote! Superb! ...
— Fantazius Mallare - A Mysterious Oath • Ben Hecht

... wish. Go, and I will await you here, but I will first change myself into a white milestone; only I pray you be very careful. The King and Queen of the town will come out to meet you, leading a little child with them. Whatever you do, don't kiss the child, or you will forget me and all that has happened to us. I will wait for you ...
— The Green Fairy Book • Various

... whispered to me, "I wish you would contrive, at the same time, to see what the boat's crew are about. Try, also, if you can get them something to eat; the fellows must be hungry enough by this time—but mind they don't get too much toddy." ...
— The Lieutenant and Commander - Being Autobigraphical Sketches of His Own Career, from - Fragments of Voyages and Travels • Basil Hall

... many things at his hands, that the birds were wild turkeys, a much-valued delicacy; hearing which the youth promptly shot some and sent them round to the ladies of the station. Do you believe that tale? I don't. ...
— Olivia in India • O. Douglas

... tracks for freedom if I were in your shoes. You're a regular convict, and, since you've had me on your hands, a galley slave is a gentleman of leisure in comparison! Why don't you go, John? You've had nothing but ...
— A Beautiful Possibility • Edith Ferguson Black

... only we're beautiful as the day," said Cyril. "I'm Cyril, and these are the others, and we're jolly hungry. Let us in, and don't be a silly idiot." ...
— Five Children and It • E. Nesbit

... I don't care whether you get back or not; there are enough niggers working on the fortifications without you. I'd like to give you a job of a different sort," ...
— Who Goes There? • Blackwood Ketcham Benson

... utterance when he saw it in print. It was the beginning of a career as a writer unparalleled in English or American history. And he told the secret of it when he wrote, "While other boys played, I read Roderick Random, Tom Jones, The Vicar of Wakefield, Don Quixote, Gil Bias, and other books. They kept alive my fancy, and my hope of something beyond ...
— From Boyhood to Manhood • William M. Thayer

... he said at last, "it was like this, to begin at the beginning. You know how we came over in August, and there we were in the thick of it, as you might say, in a day or two. An awful time it was, and I don't know how I got through it alive. My best friend was killed dead beside me as we lay in the trenches. By Cambrai, I ...
— The Angels of Mons • Arthur Machen

... instance where the secret history of books is often detected in the most obscure corners of research. Who could have imagined that in a collection of the lives de' Santi e Beati dell' Ordine de' Predicatori, we are to look for the writer of Vasari's lives? Don Serafini Razzi, the author of this ecclesiastical biography, has this reference: "Who would see more of this may turn to the Lives of the Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, written for the greater part by Don Silvano Razzi, my brother, for the Signor ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... like a canker-worm upon domestic peace and happiness. With too many in this day of money-making, marriage is but a pecuniary speculation, a mere gold and silver affair; and their match-making is but a money-making, that is, money makes the match. Many parents (but we don't call such Christians,) sacrifice their children upon the altar of mammon, and prostitute their earthly and eternal happiness to their love of ...
— The Christian Home • Samuel Philips

... don't," said I; "I will not detain you long, and the subject is one which ought to interest you and every other farmer who keeps his cows on poor grass in summer, and ...
— Talks on Manures • Joseph Harris

... have a hard time. The lady says: "I have found you a prospective husband, and now," she says, "the wedding will be on such and such a day, and that's an end to it; and don't one of you dare to argue about it!" It's a case of get along with you to the man you're told to. Because, sir, I reason this way: who wants to see disobedience in a person he's brought up? And sometimes it happens that the bride doesn't like the groom, ...
— Plays • Alexander Ostrovsky

... may say "What is all this to me? I wasn't at Maryborough. I don't like schoolboys ... they strike me as dirty, noisy, and usually foul-minded. Why should I go into raptures about such a song, which seems only to express a highly debatable approval of a certain method ...
— Book of Old Ballads • Selected by Beverly Nichols

... the least consoling! I'd as lief have two African monkeys under my care—don't laugh—it exasperates, and makes me feel like doing as I should do, if I had the ...
— May Brooke • Anna H. Dorsey

... "Don't know at all. But, even if he should come in after we have shut up, there'll be somebody to let him in. Is the colonel a friend ...
— Her Mother's Secret • Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... "Why, don't you know what that is yet?" Said Uncle Andy with a superior air. "That's old Dagger Bill, the big black-and-white loon. Sounds as if he was terribly amused, doesn't he? But he's only calling to his big black-and-white mate, or ...
— Children of the Wild • Charles G. D. Roberts

... at your photograph album. I suppose they haven't got such things where they come from. Madame Lorinet couldn't tear herself away from it. 'Nothing but men,' she said, 'have you noticed that, Jules?'—'Well, Madame,' I said, 'that's just how it is here; except for me, and I don't count, only gentlemen come here. I've kept house for bachelors where—well, ...
— The Ink-Stain, Complete • Rene Bazin

... was a young shaver, let me tell you. I've often told you young ones how I left home, when I was nine years old, with the wind in my back—that's all I got from home—and with about enough clothes on me to flag a train with. There wasn't any of these magazines then, and I don't know as they do any good, anyway. Poor old Ann Winters sent away her good, hard-earned dollar to some place in the States, where they said: 'Send us a dollar, and we'll show you how to make fifty; light employment; will not have to leave home; either ladies or gentlemen ...
— The Second Chance • Nellie L. McClung

... you know me. Some don't. But they will, presently. They will know me well enough before I get ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... friends. In the agitation that now possessed her, her colour rose, her eyes brightened; she looked for the moment almost young enough to be Emma's sister. Her husband opened his hard old eyes in surly bewilderment. "Why need you make this fuss?" he asked. "I don't understand you." Mrs. Ronald shrank at those words as if he had struck her. She kissed him in silence, and joined ...
— The Fallen Leaves • Wilkie Collins

... been baking," she announced smilingly. "I don't suppose any one will be after wanting to sample 'em? Ye do? Well, then, wipe your feet on the mat and come in. And, for the love of goodness, leave the kitchen door open. I'm near perishing for a breath of ...
— Four Little Blossoms and Their Winter Fun • Mabel C. Hawley

... no sign of them; I am giving little Crowy his supper, and am going to put him to bed. And if the bell don't ring by that time, I shall make bold to knock at the door and wake them up. Because, sir, I'm getting uneasy. Something might be the matter, though I don't know ...
— Cruel As The Grave • Mrs. Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... shook his head. "The work hasn't been coming easily at all. I suppose I've been too conscious, lately, of the criticisms every one made about 'The Stone House.' I don't believe one ought really to listen to anybody and yet it's so hard not to, and so difficult to know whose opinion one ought to take if one's going to take anybody's. I wish," he suddenly brought out, "Henry Galleon were still alive. I could ...
— Fortitude • Hugh Walpole

... endeth the thousand and first lesson. Morell: I don't think much of your preaching after all: I believe I could do it better myself. The man I want to meet is ...
— Candida • George Bernard Shaw

... and shorten up all their adjectives (it is adjectives I mean, not adverbs). I am sure you made a mistake in what you told me, that all well-bred people behave nicely at dinner, and sit up, because they don't a bit; lots of them put their elbows on the table, and nearly all sat anyhow in their chairs. Only Lady Cecilia and Mrs. Vavaseur behaved like you; but then they are both quite ...
— The Visits of Elizabeth • Elinor Glyn

... "I don't know," replied Iola. "I expect that friends will be here to meet us. Bishop B——, permit me to introduce you to Mr. Robert Johnson, whom I have every reason to believe is my mother's brother. Like myself, he is engaged in ...
— Iola Leroy - Shadows Uplifted • Frances E.W. Harper

... Internet's architecture evolves. See Lawrence Lessig, Reading the Constitution in Cyberspace, 45 Emory L.J. 869, 888 (1996) ("Cyberspace has no permanent nature, save the nature of a place of unlimited plasticity. We don't find cyberspace, we build it."); see also Lawrence Lessig, The Death of Cyberspace, 57 Wash. & Lee L. Rev. 337 (2000). For First Amendment purposes, obscenity is "limited to works which, taken as a whole, appeal ...
— Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) Ruling • United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania

... Madame d'Aubrion, entering the room without noticing the president, "don't pay any attention to what poor Monsieur d'Aubrion has just said to you; the Duchesse de Chaulieu has turned his head. I repeat, nothing shall ...
— Eugenie Grandet • Honore de Balzac

... for further song; Also our hero's lot, howe'er unpleasant (Because this Canto has become too long), Must be postponed discreetly for the present; I 'm sensible redundancy is wrong, But could not for the muse of me put less in 't: And now delay the progress of Don Juan, Till what is call'd ...
— Don Juan • Lord Byron

... old style of republicas derived from the civitates and respublicae of ancient Rome. This kind of independence and autonomy lasted unchallenged until the death of Ferdinand VII. in 1833, when, in default of male heirs, his brother Don Carlos claimed the throne, confirmed the Basque fueros, and raised the standard of revolt against his niece, Isabel II. A seven years' war followed, in which an English legion under Sir George de Lacy Evans and a naval force under Lord John ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 - "Banks" to "Bassoon" • Various

... our acquaintance, there is no reason why he should feel so bashful," remarked Jack, glancing at different points in the darkening woods; "I don't see any reason why he should prowl around ...
— Footprints in the Forest • Edward Sylvester Ellis

... don't know his name. Is this a home for old gentlemen? If you'll bring out all you've got, ...
— The Head of Kay's • P. G. Wodehouse

... countrymen, speaking with a strong Scottish burr. He wound up with an improvisation of his own, which I thought was typically British. "Now, then, boys," he sang out, "buck up, all of you! It might be worse, you know, and some of these German chaps don't seem a bad ...
— Paths of Glory - Impressions of War Written At and Near the Front • Irvin S. Cobb

... "Oh, don't send me away!" the golden-haired girl broke out, in a voice that was positively a wail, and clasping a pair of pretty, slender hands in ...
— Stories By English Authors: Germany • Various

... me, Lucia, this year droop; Three zodiacs fill'd more, I shall stoop; Let crutches then provided be To shore up my debility: Then, while thou laugh'st, I'll sighing cry, A ruin underpropt am I: Don will I then my beadsman's gown; And when so feeble I am grown As my weak shoulders cannot bear The burden of a grasshopper; Yet with the bench of aged sires, When I and they keep termly fires, With my weak voice I'll sing, or say Some odes I made of Lucia;— Then will ...
— A Selection From The Lyrical Poems Of Robert Herrick • Robert Herrick

... water barrel that arternoon th' old man was beginnin' ter think a teetotal revival had struck th' Here at Last. But though cayenne pepper drives a chap ter water pretty often while th' effect lasts, it don't have no permanent result, as th' old man found out. Course it was a mistake o' mine; but ain't we all liable to go ...
— Golden Stories - A Selection of the Best Fiction by the Foremost Writers • Various

... girls in Sharon," said he. "Parents have no say in it here, either. But that don't seem to occur to them at the moment. We'll all ...
— The Jimmyjohn Boss and Other Stories • Owen Wister

... to do with the system of fishing for and obtaining supplies from the landlord?-I don't think it has been so much that, as the fact that the landlords are resident in the place, and there is a sort of moral pressure brought to bear upon a person who is living in the neighbourhood. You don't like to make yourself odious among the neighbours ...
— Second Shetland Truck System Report • William Guthrie

... "Don't take on so, Master Owen," cried Jane, leading him to his little room; "he who is gone would not wish you to grieve. He is happy, depend upon it, and he wants you to be happy too. We shall have to leave this, ...
— Owen Hartley; or, Ups and Downs - A Tale of Land and Sea • William H. G. Kingston

... "But they don't seem to try to solve it; things get worse and worse. The king is but a lad, no older than myself, and he is in the hands of others. It seems to me a sin and a shame that things should go on as they are at present. My ...
— A March on London • G. A. Henty

... you know That a long time ago, Two poor little children, Whose names I don't know, Were stolen away on a fine summer's day, And left in a wood, so ...
— Harry's Ladder to Learning - Horn-Book, Picture-Book, Nursery Songs, Nursery Tales, - Harry's Simple Stories, Country Walks • Anonymous

... on April 30th, Dewey's flagship Olympia entered the Boca Grande channel to Manila Bay, the Baltimore, Petrel, Raleigh, Concord, and Boston following. By daybreak Cavite stood disclosed and, ready and waiting, huddled under its batteries, Admiral Montojo's fleet: Reina Christina, Castilla, Don Antonio de Ulloa, Don Juan de Austria, Isla de Luzon, Isla de Cuba, General Lezo, Marquis del Duero, El Curreo and Velasco—ten vessels to Dewey's six. Counting those of the batteries, the Spaniards' guns outnumbered and outcalibred Dewey's. All ...
— History of the United States, Volume 5 • E. Benjamin Andrews

... As Ruskin says of it in his The Ethics of the Dust, when Mary asks "and what is it made of?" "A little of everything; there's always flint (silica) and clay (alumina) and magnesia in it and the black is iron, according to its fancy; and there's boracic acid, if you know what that is: and if you don't, I cannot tell you to-day and it doesn't signify; and there's potash and soda; and on the whole, the chemistry of it is more like a mediaeval doctor's prescription, than the making of a respectable mineral." The various tourmalines ...
— A Text-Book of Precious Stones for Jewelers and the Gem-Loving Public • Frank Bertram Wade

... "Don't talk to me of stray shots!" said the burgher, hotly enough. "The enemy was better acquainted with the city than we were ourselves, and his fire was of a precision that extorted our admiration more than once. Cannons planted in Kehl sent their shells ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XII. No. 31. October, 1873. • Various

... of mingled sadness and irresolution. 'He will set forth what a loss the interest of the money is, even if I should pay the principal; and remind me that although he has stood my friend, his duty to his own family imposes limits. And he has at least a couple of thousand pounds in the county bank. I don't believe he would do anything for me but for the honour it will be to the family to have a professional man in it. And yet my father was ...
— Robert Falconer • George MacDonald

... to care for you? Don't say so! Come and live with us, brother; we'll care for you. I have never forgotten the flowers—never! Do come! Fanny shall love you. Fanny can ...
— Night and Morning, Volume 4 • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... done a lot of whispering," he admitted, "if you call it whispering, though most people, I'll gamble, would say it is like the clatter of a mill. And I've done some riding, too, both train and horse. The mountains are going to be all right. Don't you forget that, Jimmy." ...
— The Candidate - A Political Romance • Joseph Alexander Altsheler

... may it please you, Don Alphonso, With other Gentlemen of good esteeme Are iournying, to salute the Emperor, And to commend their ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... foolishness of the people who discuss with gravity the possibility of a successful invasion of these United States by a foreign foe. The thought always arises when I hear these cries from our army and naval officers for a greater armament: 'Are these men cowards?' I don't believe it. It is their profession which makes ...
— The New York Times Current History of the European War, Vol. 1, January 9, 1915 - What Americans Say to Europe • Various

... "Please don't move," she said, "and do forgive us for this intrusion. Colonel Ray wanted to call and apologize about this evening, and I am so glad that he did. We are going to take no end of liberties, but you must remember that we are ...
— The Betrayal • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... right, stranger," was the reply. "I don't know much about these contraptions, but I haven't touched her. I knowed she was an airship, for I've seen pictures of 'em, and I've been waiting until the ...
— Tom Swift Among The Diamond Makers - or The Secret of Phantom Mountain • Victor Appleton

... don't know," cried Mrs. Aalbom, putting her head on one side and looking up to the ceiling. "It is possible to have too much of natural affection, mother's influence, home feeling, ...
— Garman and Worse - A Norwegian Novel • Alexander Lange Kielland

... all right,' she gasped. 'I am quite well. Don't tell them. I am quite well—it was my ...
— The Beautiful Wretch; The Pupil of Aurelius; and The Four Macnicols • William Black

... Rod.—Zounds, he has don't: now, Roderick, joy thy fill. Burbon is thine, the Dukedome is thine owne, For only he in the Inheritance Stood as an obstacle to let my clayme. This deed of his will take away his life: And then let me alone to enjoy his land. Ile steale away unseene, cause unsuspected; I would not ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. III • Various

... fair, Beloved, what are names but air? Take thou whatever suits the line, Clelia, Iphigenia, Chloris, Laura, Lesbia, Delia, Doris— But don't forget to ...
— Translations of German Poetry in American Magazines 1741-1810 • Edward Ziegler Davis

... drawing-room, and Miss Louisa is practising her scales. You have got a maggot in your brain, Greatson. Life such as you are thinking of is the most commonplace thing in the world. The middle-classes haven't the capacity for passion—even the tragedy of existence never troubles them. Don't try to stir up the muddy waters, Arnold. Write a pretty story about a Princess and her lovers, and ...
— The Master Mummer • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... peripatetic pain producer wasn't to be used so much for the American troops' discomfort as to fix up the cavities and what-not of the civil population of France. That was encouraging news, for while we don't bear our allies any ill-will, we think they ought to have the honor of trying out the experiment first "Apres vous, mon chere ...
— The Stars & Stripes, Vol 1, No 1, February 8, 1918, - The American Soldiers' Newspaper of World War I, 1918-1919 • American Expeditionary Forces

... Myles, hold on! Don't get mad. Keep yer shirt on," interposed McGowan, as a peacemaker. "Myles, you and Dinny Dempsey, the blind piper, used to be good friends. Now, suppose we get Dinny. How will he ...
— A Pirate of Parts • Richard Neville

... heart of the Queensland bush. "Do what you like with it, dear boy," the letter runs, "so long as you keep me out of it. Thanks for your complimentary regrets, but I cannot share them. I was never fitted for a literary career. Lucky for me, I found it out in time. Some poor devils don't. (I'm not getting at you, old man. We read all your stuff, and like it very much. Time hangs a bit heavy, you know, here, in the winter, and we are glad of almost anything.) This life suits me better. I love to feel my horse between my thighs, and the ...
— Novel Notes • Jerome K. Jerome

... "I don't fancy calling him by his Kaffir name," he said to himself. "I must get one more suited to him." As he looked at the thick auburn hair which hung in curls over the boy's head, his freckled, though otherwise fair countenance, his large blue eyes, and broad, open countenance, he exclaimed, "I ...
— Hendricks the Hunter - The Border Farm, a Tale of Zululand • W.H.G. Kingston

... town, especially if you can write Harkaway Hall as your address. The man will set you down for a real country-squire, and will give you tick for the next twenty years. But if you want to avoid having your pocket picked, don't wear buckskins as you go along Piccadilly; buckskins and tops, on foot, are so truly Arcadian in their appearance, that the swell mob cannot resist the temptation, and you are pretty sure to be victimized. As for the unmeaning black things worn with white silk stockings on court-days, and ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 57, No. 356, June, 1845 • Various

... things yet; I don' know; and some of 'em won't have to be bought, with a little contrivance. I'll spend the least I kin; and then we'll talk ...
— Opportunities • Susan Warner

... was less disinterested, perhaps, he writes to another friend: "Mme. du Deffand hates the philosophers, so you must give them up to her. She and Mme. Geoffrin are no friends; so if you go thither, don't tell her of it—Indeed you would be sick of that house whither all the pretended beaux esprits and false savants go, and where they are very impertinent ...
— The Women of the French Salons • Amelia Gere Mason

... called upon the ladies for their version of the troubles. Miss Pink, who is a school teacher, said: 'We women do four-fifths of the work, and contribute more than one-half the money to support the church. Two years ago we were allowed to vote for a minister, and we don't see why we shouldn't vote for trustees and at other elections.' Miss Camp gave similar reasons for voting. Mrs. Montgomery Lyon said: 'If the old trustees didn't know that we had a right to vote, it isn't our fault. We women do all the work, and why shouldn't ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... diverting Manner was always practised by Mr. Dryden, who if he was not the best Writer of Tragedies in his time, was allowed by every one to have the happiest Turn for a Prologue or an Epilogue. The Epilogues to Cleomenes, Don Sebastian, The Duke of Guise, Aurengzebe, and Love Triumphant, are all Precedents of ...
— The Spectator, Volume 2. • Addison and Steele

... "Don't you see that the house is shut up?" he grumbled. "We have had orders to watch the place, but none ...
— That Affair Next Door • Anna Katharine Green

... Garibaldi took time to investigate conditions. Then he offered his services to Don Gonzales, who had set up a republic on a side street, and was fighting the power of the ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 9 - Subtitle: Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Reformers • Elbert Hubbard

... impious and profligate life of his contemporaries, and brought up his son Francesco to the three rules: 'Let other men's wives alone; strike none of your followers, or, if you do, send the injured man far away; don't ride a hard-mouthed horse, or one that drops his shoe.' But his chief source of influence lay in the qualities, if not of a great general, at least of a great soldier. His frame was powerful, and developed by every kind of exercise; his peasant's ...
— The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy • Jacob Burckhardt

... up—I don't remember how; but Clarence was to help me down the stairs, and Mr. Fordyce, frowning with anxiety at the process, was offering assistance, while we had much rather he had gone out of the way; when suddenly, ...
— Chantry House • Charlotte M. Yonge

... the last to cherish the prospect of a tour to Italy, but never accomplished his purpose. Death had all along been his great object of dread, and its fast approaches were regarded with unmitigated terror. "Cut deeper," he cried to the physicians who were operating on his limbs; "cut deeper; I don't care for pain, but I fear death." He fixed all his dying hope upon the Cross, and recommended Clarke's Sermons as fullest on the doctrine of a Propitiation. He spoke of the Bible and of the Sabbath with the warmest feelings ...
— Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett - With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes • Samuel Johnson, Thomas Parnell, Thomas Gray, and Tobias Smollett

... sure I don't know. We talk and talk and never get anywhere, and we ask all our friends and they just answer the way we want 'em to. I wish somebody'd take ...
— The Beautiful and Damned • F. Scott Fitzgerald

... why it don't sound more'n half nutty, too, delivered that way. For with Vee's chin on my shoulder, and some of that silky straw-colored hair brushin' my face, and a slim, smooth arm hooked chummy through one of mine—well, say; she could make a tabulated bank ...
— Wilt Thou Torchy • Sewell Ford

... problematical," said Bearwarden. "The earth seems destined to have a calm old age," said Cortlandt, "unless we can look to the Cabinet to prevent it." "This world will soon be a dull place. I wish we could leave it for a change," said Ayrault. "I don't mean forever, of course, but just as people have grown tired of remaining like plants in the places in which they grew. Alan has been a caterpillar for untold ages; can he not become the butterfly?" "Since we have found out how to straighten the axis," said Deepwaters, ...
— A Journey in Other Worlds • J. J. Astor

... stimulated by newspaper editors, ministers of the Gospel, and stiff-backed Republicans, who, like similar classes in the South, declared that the war was to be over in three months. Other armies collected at Cincinnati under young George B. McClellan, soon to be major-general, at Louisville under Don C. Buell, and at St. Louis under the erratic John C. Fremont. When Congress met, all these movements were quickly ratified, and the two sections of a country of more than thirty million people, all ...
— Expansion and Conflict • William E. Dodd

... laid for pa ever since, and it was only a matter of time when they got him. Then at Pittsburg our manager picked up a company of cannibals that had got left over from the St. Louis fair, and who agreed to perform for their board and clothes, and as they don't wear any clothes to speak of, and only eat dog week days, and hope to get a human being to roast on Sunday, it seemed a pretty ...
— Peck's Bad Boy at the Circus • George W. Peck

... find the following remarks on one of my earliest dinners with Faraday: 'At two o'clock he came down for me. He, his niece, and myself, formed the party, "I never give dinners," he said. "I don't know how to give dinners, and I never dine out. But I should not like my friends to attribute this to a wrong cause. I act thus for the sake of securing time for work, and not through religious motives, as some imagine." He said grace. ...
— Fragments of science, V. 1-2 • John Tyndall

... I should not have come. I don't want to make trouble for you, child." His voice was infinitely caressing. "As it happens, I know your grandfather's Sunday habits, and I met your father and mother on the road going out of town at noon. I knew they had not ...
— A Poor Wise Man • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... "I came here trusting to Goodrich's positive promise to pay me forty-five dollars as soon as I arrived; and he has kept promising from one day to another, till I do not see that he means to pay at all. I have now broke off all intercourse with him, and never think of going near him.... I don't feel at all obliged to him about the editorship, for he is a stockholder and director in the Bewick Company ... and I defy them to get another to do for a thousand dollars, what I do for five hundred."—"I make nothing," he says in another ...
— Hawthorne - (English Men of Letters Series) • Henry James, Junr.

... woman's warning. I've a good mind not to tell you the way to the under-waters; indeed, I would n't if you were n't a sailor and a child of the sea. Yes, I can show you the road to under the sea; but you must not ask me about the emerald, because I don't know where it is myself. It was in the Land of the Dawn, and that's the last I heard of it! When you do get to the under-waters, don't forget that. You'll have to hurry back like the wind, for the year which the King gave your father is ...
— The Firelight Fairy Book • Henry Beston

... "Why, don't you know? This is Lady Dover's house—poor old soul! and she is still there, in the top room. No one can save her now, but it is a ...
— The Junior Classics • Various

... good many things you don't know about me, Bunny," said he wearily. "Did you know I was in Carlsbad, ...
— Mr. Justice Raffles • E. W. Hornung

... numerous merits. It is for this reason that he of a hundred sacrifices (Indra) hath become what he is, and by vanquishing the Asuras he ruleth the universe. Hostility with whom else than thee is so sure of leading to heaven, proud as thou art of the excessive strength of thy vast Magadha host? Don't disregard others, O king. Valour dwelleth in every man. O king of men, there are many men whose valour may be equal or superior to thine. As long as these are not known, so long only art thou noted for ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... "No," answered Adam, "I don't look at things that way. But then I'm not ambitious. Last year, in New Orleans, I watched a man gaming. He won a handful of French crowns. 'Ha!' says he, 'they glittered, but they do not glitter now! Again!'—and this time he won doubloons. 'We'll ...
— Lewis Rand • Mary Johnston

... Philip. "It is the last thing in the world that one would believe—but I do; I believe it. Something—I don't know what—told me that you belonged to this world as you stood there beside the rock. But I don't understand. A thousand miles from a city—and you! It's unreal. It's almost like the dreams I've been dreaming during the past eighteen months, and the visions I've seen during that long, ...
— God's Country—And the Woman • James Oliver Curwood

... never can tell about a reader; Perhaps that's why we think them all so nice. You never find two alike at any one time And you never find one alike twice. You're never very certain that they read you, And you're often very certain that they don't. Though an author fancy still that he has the strongest will It's the reader has the ...
— A Thousand and One Afternoons in Chicago • Ben Hecht

... seemed as if he made but one step to the door, and his face looked as black as night. I thought if he overtook you, he might,—I did not know what he would do, he was so angry. I sat near the door, and I jumped right up and faced him on the threshold. 'Don't, sir, don't! I cried; she is a little girl, and ...
— Ernest Linwood - or, The Inner Life of the Author • Caroline Lee Hentz

... won't have dinner in the middle of the day, but between six and seven, as they do in Petersburg. I am simply distracted with worry! By seven o'clock the dinner will be done to rags in the oven. Really, men don't understand anything about housekeeping, though they have so much intellect. Oh, dear! we shall have to cook two dinners every day! You will have dinner at midday as before, children, while your poor old mother has to wait till seven, for ...
— The Wife and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... were still happy days.—Don't you think so, Julian? For we haven't met either since we spent those beautiful summer evenings in ...
— The Lonely Way—Intermezzo—Countess Mizzie - Three Plays • Arthur Schnitzler

... imbecility of the impending fight filled him with desolation. From a distant part of the field a stentorian voice shouted commands at proper intervals: Au pas—Au trot—Chargez! Presentiments of death don't come to a man for nothing he thought at the moment he ...
— The Point Of Honor - A Military Tale • Joseph Conrad

... Criminel bethought himself that the only way to make him speake would bee to sende for a ministre soe hee did to Monsr Daillie butt hee because the Edicts don't permitt ministres to come to condemned persons in publique butt only to comfort them in private before they goe out of prison refused to come till hee sent a huissier who if hee had refused the ...
— The Valet's Tragedy and Other Stories • Andrew Lang

... "I don't know," said Mr. Holwell. "After the way in which he has behaved, there are no depths of infamy of which I believe him incapable. But you are my right hand here. Supposing Mr. Drake refuses, you ...
— With Clive in India - Or, The Beginnings of an Empire • G. A. Henty

... Felix. He is at home, must be, for I have neither seen nor felt his presence since that fateful night. What did I write? I don't remember. I seem to be living in a dream. Everything is confused about me but Eva's face, Eva's smile. They are blissfully clear. Sometimes I wish they were not. Were they confused amid these shadows, I might have stronger hope of keeping my word ...
— The Circular Study • Anna Katharine Green

... hope that had somehow grown chilled and unreal. His thoughts were abruptly disorganized and out of his control. Only the urgency remained. "It's the key evidence. And we've got to move fast! I don't know how long it takes, but even one more ...
— Dead Ringer • Lester del Rey

... is a man of good family. I don't know where he comes from. He is engaged in some business of the Cardinal's, and it was his Eminence himself who presented him to St James. Both parties have chosen St James for umpire; in that, you will say, the provincial has not shown much wisdom; but who can the people be who confide ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 54, No. 337, November, 1843 • Various

... Don Calixto and the Canon were very anxious to visit the Catacombs. Caesar knew that the visit is not entirely agreeable, and attempted to ...
— Caesar or Nothing • Pio Baroja Baroja

... like to go to Durer in Nurnberg, but I don't want to be a plate-engraver. I would rather cut figures ...
— After Long Years and Other Stories • Translated from the German by Sophie A. Miller and Agnes M. Dunne

... certain of it,' said Bridget with emphasis. 'But it's no good trying to persuade her. I don't try.' ...
— Missing • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... don't know what was in this glance we exchanged. I have stopped myself just on the verge of a full explanation of the thrills, quivers, hopes, fears, and dreams which assailed me as I looked back into the beautiful face of Lady Mary. I was also going to explain how the whole scene appeared. ...
— The O'Ruddy - A Romance • Stephen Crane

... a deep, shaken voice, "don't torture me needlessly. You have not murdered him. You threw yourself into the water with the impulse to save him. Tell me the rest afterward. This death was an accident that ...
— Daniel Deronda • George Eliot

... "I don't quite know what you mean," was the little girl's reply—a sweet, refined way of speaking had she, and her eyes sparkled with shy merriment, although there was a ...
— The Heiress of Wyvern Court • Emilie Searchfield

... their eyes off our clothes, so much did they admire them! It was quite amusing, the funny questions they asked us about them. They all promised to help us look for a dwelling; and they kept their promise. I can tell you it was a great help and comfort to us that they did, for I don't know what would have become of us out here, away from our old friends, where the ways of living are so different from what we have been used to. Whether it will always be so or not, of course I ...
— Pictures of Jewish Home-Life Fifty Years Ago • Hannah Trager

... girl—and many a spark Flashed from her eyelid as she said it— "Under the rose, or in the dark, One might, perhaps, have cause to dread it; But when its wicked eyes appear, And when we know for what they wink so, One must be very simple, dear, To let it sting one—don't you think so?" ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 2 (of 4) • Various

... for her husband grew greater every day. "Do what you like—dine where you please—go and have ginger-beer and sawdust at Astley's, or psalm-singing with Lady Jane—only don't expect me to busy myself with the boy. I have your interests to attend to, as you can't attend to them yourself. I should like to know where you would have been now, and in what sort of a position in society, if I had not looked after you." Indeed, nobody wanted poor old Rawdon ...
— Vanity Fair • William Makepeace Thackeray

... that afther I hear it, Mary, my woman; you won't expect me to tell what I don't know?—ha, ...
— Phil Purcel, The Pig-Driver; The Geography Of An Irish Oath; The Lianhan Shee • William Carleton

... pay her board, and give her money for clothes, and five thousand dollars beside, whenever she should get married. I'm sure she's welcome to stay, if it was without pay, for we all love her, but, somehow, it don't seem the right place for her—and, as to marrying, I don't think she'll ever marry any body around her, for, kind-spoken as she is, they wouldn't any of them dare to ask her, though they're all in ...
— Evenings at Donaldson Manor - Or, The Christmas Guest • Maria J. McIntosh

... Don Ferdinando, brother to the emperor Charles 5. vnto king Henry the 8. in the yeere 1527 desiring his aide against Solyman the great Turke. ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, v5 - Central and Southern Europe • Richard Hakluyt

... on a brief visit to the coffee estate of Don Herero, near Guines, and having expressed a desire to visit the southern coast, our host proposed that we should do so together on the following day. We were to start on horseback quite early in the morning, ...
— Due South or Cuba Past and Present • Maturin M. Ballou

... laughed in spite of his anxiety. "You will have it that we are back in America again," said he. "They don't do things in that way ...
— The Refugees • Arthur Conan Doyle

... just said, "I should s'pose, Mrs. Black, Your little girl wonders why don't you come back." That's all that I spoke, every 'dentical word; But she said, "Little girls should ...
— Cinderella; or, The Little Glass Slipper and Other Stories • Anonymous

... with his mountain drawl, "I don't want you bearing down too much on that killing part. Tell it ...
— Sergeant York And His People • Sam Cowan

... Clary, and don't be too much cast down —whatever your mortifications may be from such noble prospects over-clouded, and from the reflections you will have from within, on your faulty step, and from the sullying of such a charming character by it, you will receive none from any of us; and, as an earnest ...
— Clarissa Harlowe, Volume 9 (of 9) - The History Of A Young Lady • Samuel Richardson

... to fit out these expeditions without coming into antagonism with the viceroy Don Antonio de Mendoza, whom the emperor had sent to Mexico, an appointment which had wounded the feelings of the Marquis della Valle. Wearied with these continual, annoyances, and indignant at finding his prerogative as captain-general, if not absolutely ignored, at least perpetually questioned, ...
— Celebrated Travels and Travellers - Part I. The Exploration of the World • Jules Verne

... be in it. I've written in stuff that the other boys can't do to save their lives. REAL stuff, Lite! You and I are going to run the ranch and punch the cows,—Lazy A cattle, what there are left of them,—and hunt down a bunch of rustlers that have their hangout somewhere down in the breaks; we don't know just where, yet. The places we'll ride, they'll need an airship to follow with the camera! I haven't got it all planned yet, but the first reel is about done; we're going to begin on it this afternoon. We'll need you in the first scenes,—just ...
— Jean of the Lazy A • B. M. Bower

... is your uncle"—pointing to me—"who has come all the way to honour you with a visit. Mind you don't disappoint him. His name is Maeterlinck." Krall pronounced the first syllable German-fashion: Mah. "You understand: Maeterlinck. Now show him that you know your letters and that you can spell a name correctly, like a clever boy. Go ahead, we're listening." ...
— The Unknown Guest • Maurice Maeterlinck

... mind, Dad, I've about decided to go to the Institute instead of Chicago. There is a bunch of us going, and Mr. Drury will be there. Uncle Henry's folks might not want to be bothered with me now, and anyway I don't know them very well. But I can go to the Institute with the church crowd; and there will be tennis and swimming and plenty of other fun besides the big program." Which was quite ...
— John Wesley, Jr. - The Story of an Experiment • Dan B. Brummitt

... weeks longer before we get one again, I'm thinking, unless the king's party gather," said his comrade. "We don't get our fair share of fighting, ...
— Boycotted - And Other Stories • Talbot Baines Reed

... you don't know, but you think very likely these scales are some sort of bug, as everything nowadays seems ...
— The Insect Folk • Margaret Warner Morley

... William. Give my respects to the cook, and mind you don't work too hard. Think what it would be if you developed heart disease. Awful! You ...
— A Prefect's Uncle • P. G. Wodehouse

... links occasionally, and now and then I had some good games with visitors to the place. One day after such a match my opponent remarked very seriously to me, "Harry, if you take my advice you will get away from here as quickly as you can, as you don't get half enough golf to bring you out." I took the advice very much to heart. I was not unduly conceited about my golf in those days, and the possibility of being Champion at some future time had taken no definite shape in my mind; but I was naturally ambitious ...
— The Complete Golfer [1905] • Harry Vardon

... poor man,' he would have said, 'you have, some god of your own, who will be quite as good for your countrymen as Jupiter for mine. But, if you have not, really I am sorry for your case; and a very odd case it is: but I don't see how it could be improved by talking nonsense. You cannot beneficially, you cannot rationally, worship a tutelary Roman deity, unless in the character of a Roman; and a Roman you may become, legally and politically. Being such, you will ...
— Theological Essays and Other Papers v1 • Thomas de Quincey

... given him, as paramount to every other consideration; the other panders to the caprice and ignorance of those who employ him. This it was that made Reynolds's master, Hudson, exclaim, after Sir Joshua's return from Italy, "Why, Joshua, you don't paint so well as you did before you went abroad!" When men of genius and high talent fall upon favourable times, the result is the reverse, and the fine arts are esteemed, and their professors rewarded according to their excellence. ...
— Rembrandt and His Works • John Burnet



Words linked to "Don" :   assume, get dressed, Rostov on Don, Cambria, head, Don Quixote, hat, preceptor, Don Juan, Don River, river, Spanish, United Kingdom, title of respect, Wales, Russian Federation, Russia, Britain, don't-know, UK, Don Marquis, chief, Don Budge



Copyright © 2018 Free-Translator.com