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Cartilage   Listen
noun
Cartilage  n.  (Anat.) A translucent, elastic tissue; gristle. Note: Cartilage contains no vessels, and consists of a homogeneous, intercellular matrix, in which there are numerous minute cavities, or capsules, containing protoplasmic cells, the cartilage corpuscul.
Articular cartilage, cartilage that lines the joints.
Cartilage bone (Anat.), any bone formed by the ossification of cartilage.
Costal cartilage, cartilage joining a rib with he sternum.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Cartilage" Quotes from Famous Books



... may yet meet with some of those saurians which science has reconstructed out of a bit of bone or cartilage. I took up the telescope and scanned the whole horizon, and found it everywhere a desert sea. We are far away removed from ...
— A Journey to the Interior of the Earth • Jules Verne

... strongly to the tongue, although, as proved by the use of hydrochloric acid, the greater part of the cartilage is still retained in them, which appears, however, to have undergone that transformation into gelatine which has been observed by v. Bibra in fossil bones. The surface of all the bones is in many spots covered with minute black specks, which, more ...
— Lectures and Essays • T.H. Huxley

... animal bone is boiled or steamed under pressure for removal of the fat and the cartilage, the content of nitrogen is reduced, and the percentage of phosphoric acid is increased by this removal of fat and nitrogenous substance. The nitrogen in steamed bone may run as low as 1 per cent, and the phosphoric acid ...
— Crops and Methods for Soil Improvement • Alva Agee

... interior cartilage 1.1 inches. Breadth of interior cartilage 0.5 inches. Total length of blue base 1.7 inches. Breadth of blue base 1.0 inches. Height of centre of crest 0.5 inches. Rim round crest, in ...
— Journals Of Two Expeditions Of Discovery In North-West And Western Australia, Vol. 2 (of 2) • George Grey

... "Listen to reason, won't you?" he objurgated, as, this time, the reason he referred to was the introduction of the ring clear through both nostrils, higher up, and through the central dividing wall of cartilage. But St. Elias was unreasonable. Unlike Ben Bolt, there was nothing inside of him weak enough, or nervous enough, or high- strung enough, to break. The moment he was free he ripped the ring away with half of his nose along with it. Mulcachy punched St. Elias's right ear. St. Elias tore his right ...
— Michael, Brother of Jerry • Jack London

... fold of the lip, but with no loose skin to hang down. JAW—The lower jaw should be about level, or at any rate not project more than the sixteenth of an inch. NOSE AND NOSTRILS—The bridge of the nose should be very wide, with a slight ridge where the cartilage joins the bone. (This is quite a characteristic of the breed.) The nostrils should be large, wide, and open, giving a blunt look to the nose. A butterfly or flesh-coloured nose is not objected to in harlequins. EARS—The ears should be small, set high on the skull, ...
— Dogs and All About Them • Robert Leighton

... got itself entangled in its mother's nose-rope, and as we did not then understand the management of camels, and how their nose-ropes should be adjusted, we could not prevent the little brute from tearing the button clean through the cartilage of the poor old cow's nose; this not only caused the animal frightful pain, but made her more obstinate and stubborn and harder to get along than before. The agony the poor creature suffered from flies must have been excruciating, as after this accident they entered ...
— Australia Twice Traversed, The Romance of Exploration • Ernest Giles

... his work on Southwestern Africa, says: "A short strong stick, of peculiar shape, is forced through the cartilage of the nose of the ox, and to either end of this stick is attached (in bridle fashion) a tough leathern thong. From the extreme tenderness of the nose he is now more easily managed." "Hans presented me with an ox called 'Spring,' which I afterward ...
— The Prairie Traveler - A Hand-book for Overland Expeditions • Randolph Marcy

... industry. But under a mild sky the traditional fig-leaf, the screen of modesty, was for a long while sufficient. Among peoples remote from civilization, it still suffices in our day, together with its ornamental complement, the fish-bone through the cartilage of the nose, the red feather in the hair, the string round the loins. We must not forget the smear of rancid butter, which serves to keep off the Mosquito and reminds us of the unguent employed by the grub ...
— The Glow-Worm and Other Beetles • Jean Henri Fabre

... should become stiff enough to keep it open constantly and let the air flow backward and forward. So we find growing up in the walls of this air pipe, cells which turn themselves into rings of gristle, or cartilage. ...
— A Handbook of Health • Woods Hutchinson

... Even when forced to keep clean, their skins give out a rancid odour, something (Sir H. H. Johnston says) between the smell of a monkey and a negro. Their faces are remarkable for the long upper lip, and the bridgeless nose with enormous alae (the cartilage of the nose above the nostrils). Like the Batwa they are nomad hunters, building only huts of sticks and leaves, and living in the forest, where they hunt the largest game with no weapon but a tiny bow from which they shoot poisoned arrows. Sir H. H. Johnston states ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 2 - "Baconthorpe" to "Bankruptcy" • Various

... The expanded bases circumscribe an oval space, nearly in the centre of the front of the cell, the upper two-thirds of which space are occupied by the circular mouth, on each side of which is a small calcareous tooth, to which apparently are articulated the horns of the semilunar lateral cartilage. The lower third is filled up by a yellow, horny (?) membrane, upon which are placed three conical eminences, disposed in a triangular manner. The back of the cell is very convex, and has running along the middle of it an elevated crest or keel, which is acuminate in the middle. The ovicell is ...
— Narrative Of The Voyage Of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By The Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During The Years 1846-1850. Including Discoveries And Surveys In New Guinea, The Louisiade • John MacGillivray

... into the Caspian Sea. The Danaper begins in a great marsh and issues 46 from it as from its mother. It is sweet and fit to drink as far as half-way down its course. It also produces fish of a fine flavor and without bones, having only cartilage as the frame-work of their bodies. But as it approaches the Pontus it receives a little spring called Exampaeus, so very bitter that although the river is navigable for the length of a forty days' voyage, it is so altered by the water of this ...
— The Origin and Deeds of the Goths • Jordanes

... whom he saw carefully and accurately; and his account of their boats, weapons, and mode of warfare is concise and good. Some friendly Darnley Islanders were described as stoutly made, with bushy hair; the cartilage between the nostrils cut away; the lobes of the ears split, and stretched "to a good length." "They had no kind of clothing, but wore necklaces of cowrie shells fastened to a braid of fibres; and some of their companions ...
— The Life of Captain Matthew Flinders • Ernest Scott

... The simplest variety in this group is hyaline (i.e. glassy) cartilage (gristle). In this the formative cells (the cartilage corpuscles) are enjellied in a clear structureless matrix (Figure XII.), consisting entirely of organic compounds accumulated by their activity. ...
— Text Book of Biology, Part 1: Vertebrata • H. G. Wells

... precipitate; inspissation^; gelation, thickening &c v.. indivisibility, indiscerptibility^, insolubility, indissolvableness. solid body, mass, block, knot, lump; concretion, concrete, conglomerate; cake, clot, stone, curd, coagulum; bone, gristle, cartilage; casein, crassamentum^; legumin^. superdense matter, condensed states of matter; dwarf star, neutron star. V. be dense &c adj.; become solid, render solid &c adj.; solidify, solidate^; concrete, set, take a set, consolidate, congeal, coagulate; curd, curdle; lopper; fix, clot, ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... the Anita Nose Adjuster to improve their appearance. Shapes flesh and cartilage of the nose—safely, painlessly, while you sleep. Results are lasting. Doctors approve it. Money back guarantee. Gold Medal winner. Write for 30-Day TRIAL OFFER and ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science February 1930 • Various

... chapter we find that water composes three-fifths of the entire body. The elasticity of muscles, cartilage, tendons, and even of bones is due in great part to the water which these tissues contain. The amount of water required by a healthy man in twenty-four hours (children in proportion) is on the average between 50 and 60 ounces, beside about 25 ounces taken as an ingredient of solid ...
— Public School Domestic Science • Mrs. J. Hoodless

... homogeneous solid, such as is found at the back of the cornea, or forming the intercellular substance of cartilage. ...
— Medical Essays • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... cartilage, &c., from bone, skin, and connective issue. They approach the proteids in composition, but unlike them they cannot form flesh or fulfil the same purpose in nutrition. Some food chemists wish to call the osseids, albuminoids; what were formerly termed ...
— The Chemistry of Food and Nutrition • A. W. Duncan

... wings that are intended for employment in flight are transparent membranes, with the course of the air-tubes marked out upon them as opaque nervures. These air-tubes, it will be remembered, are lined by spires of dense cartilage; and hence it is that they become nervures so well adapted to act like tent-lines in keeping the expanded membranes stretched. In the dragon-flies, the nervures are minutely netted for the sake of increased strength; in the bees, the nervures are simply ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 437 - Volume 17, New Series, May 15, 1852 • Various

... short-faced tumbler pigeons, and in one variety of the carp—for the bones of the face to become greatly shortened. In the case of the dog, as H. Mueller has shown, this seems caused by an abnormal state of the primordial cartilage. We may, however, readily admit that abundant and rich food supplied during many generations would give an inherited tendency to increased size of body, and that, from disuse, the limbs would become finer and shorter.[161] We shall in a future chapter also see that the skull and limbs are apparently ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I. • Charles Darwin

... L, Plate 1. But the apices of both lungs would be wounded if the same instrument entered deeply on either side of this median line at K K. An instrument which would pierce the sternum opposite the insertion of the second, third, or fourth costal cartilage, from H downwards, would transfix some part of the arch of the aorta, C, Plate 1. The same instrument, if pushed horizontally backward through the second, third, or fourth interspaces of the costal cartilages close to the sternum, would wound, on the right of the sternal ...
— Surgical Anatomy • Joseph Maclise

... arsenal, storehouses, and citadel: it lay between a large lake and the sea. We have already noticed the etymological meaning of the word Cothon: that this meaning is accurate may be inferred from the word being applied to several artificial harbours in the Carthaginian dominion, besides that of Cartilage itself: it was applied to the port of Adrumetum, a large city built on a promontory,—and to the port of Thapsus, a maritime town, situated on a kind of isthmus, between the sea and a lake. The artificial nature, of this latter harbour is placed beyond all ...
— Robert Kerr's General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 18 • William Stevenson

... shameful old graveyard a block or two above you here, in this street—there, now, I just expected that cartilage would let go! —third rib from the bottom, friend, hitch the end of it to my spine with a string, if you have got such a thing about you, though a bit of silver wire is a deal pleasanter, and more durable and becoming, if one keeps it polished—to ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... bands are two ligaments or folds of mucous membrane attached in front to the largest cartilage of the larynx, called the thyroid, and which forms in man the protuberance commonly called Adam's apple; and, extending horizontally backward, are inserted posteriorly into the arytenoid cartilages, the right vocal band into the right arytenoid cartilage ...
— The Child-Voice in Singing • Francis E. Howard

... of which are held in solution by water. The younger the animal, the greater is the proportion of water and the lower the nutritive value of meat. It should be understood, however, that not all of meat is edible material; indeed, a large part of it is made up of gristle, bones, cartilage, nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue. The amount of these indigestible materials also varies in different animals and different cuts, but the average proportion in a piece of meat is usually considered to be 15 per cent. of the whole. Because of the variation of both ...
— Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 3 - Volume 3: Soup; Meat; Poultry and Game; Fish and Shell Fish • Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

... coarse hair. Whenever they dressed for any particular occasion, they anointed themselves all over with charcoal and grease, and painted their eyebrows, lips and forehead, or cheeks, with vermillion. Some had their noses perforated through the cartilage, in which was fixed part of a goose quill, or a piece of tin, worn as an ornament, while others strutted with the skin of a raven ingeniously folded as a head dress, to present the beak over the forehead, and the tail spreading over the back ...
— The Substance of a Journal During a Residence at the Red River Colony, British North America • John West

... there was an ounce of flesh on the whole of his body. His cheeks and the sockets of his eyes were hollow. The skin was drawn tightly over his cheek bones,—the bones themselves were staring through. Even his nose was wasted, so that nothing but a ridge of cartilage remained. I put my arm beneath his shoulder and raised him from the floor; no resistance was offered by the body's gravity,—he was as ...
— The Beetle - A Mystery • Richard Marsh

... May describes an ovariotomy performed during pregnancy at Tottenham Hospital. The woman, aged twenty-two, was pale, diminutive in size, and showed an enormous abdomen, which measured 50 inches in circumference at the umbilicus and 27 inches from the ensiform cartilage to the pubes. At the operation, 36 pints of brown fluid were drawn off. Delivery took place twelve hours after the operation, the mother recovering, but the child was lost. Galabin had a case of ovariotomy performed on a woman in the sixth month of pregnancy without interruption ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... DIVIDED FISHES into two great tribes, the osseous and the cartilaginous, yet the distinction is not very precise; for the first have a great deal of cartilage, and the second, at any rate, a portion of calcareous matter in their bones. It may, therefore, be said that the bones of fishes form a kind of intermediate substance between true bones and cartilages. ...
— The Book of Household Management • Mrs. Isabella Beeton

... was by passing ropes through their nostrils and round their horns; but, having been once enraged at the sight of our men, they became so furious that they sometimes broke the trees to which they were often under the necessity of being tied; sometimes they tore asunder the cartilage of the nostril through which the ropes ran, and got loose. On these occasions, all the exertions of the men to recover them would have been ineffectual, without the assistance of some young boys, whom these animals would permit to approach them, and by whose little ...
— Narrative of the Voyages Round The World, • A. Kippis

... entry with a normal undeformed bullet varies in appearance according to whether the projectile has impinged at a right angle or at increasing degrees of obliquity, or again, to whether the skin is supported by soft tissues alone, or on those of a more resistent nature such as bone or cartilage. ...
— Surgical Experiences in South Africa, 1899-1900 • George Henry Makins

... ropes by a ring in his nose. It was a bull, in terrible excitement, bounding this way and that, dragging and driving the men—doing his best in fact to break away, now from the one of them, now from the other, and now from both at once. It must have tortured him to pull those strong men by the cartilage of his nose, but he was in too great a rage to feel it much. Every other moment his hoofs would be higher than his head, and again hoofs and head and horns would be scraping the ground in a fruitless rush to send one of his tormentors into space beyond the ken of bulls. ...
— A Rough Shaking • George MacDonald

... ago related. He was dreadfully pulled down at the time, and few people could have survived it. But now that stood him in the very best stead, not only as a lesson of patience, but also in the question of cartilage. But not being certain what cartilage is, I can only refer inquirers to the note-book of the ...
— Erema - My Father's Sin • R. D. Blackmore

... are two crescentic plates of white fibro-cartilage, which lie upon the upper end of the tibia, and serve to deepen the articular surface for the condyles of the femur. Each cartilage is firmly attached to the tibia by its anterior and posterior ends, and, through the medium of the coronary ligaments, is loosely ...
— Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities—Head—Neck. Sixth Edition. • Alexander Miles

... followed through the animal series and in various organs. I further found that certain granules only occurred in particular cells, for which they were characteristic, as pigment is for pigment cells, and glycogen for cartilage cells (Neumann) and so forth. We can diagnose the variously shaped mast cells only by the staining of their granules in dahlia solution, that is by a microchemical test. And in the same way we can separate tinctorially other granulated cells, morphologically indistinguishable, ...
— Histology of the Blood - Normal and Pathological • Paul Ehrlich

... handler and picked up a heavy scalpel from the instrument rack. "There's a certain advantage to this," he said as he moved the handler delicately. "These gadgets give a tremendous mechanical advantage. I can cut right through small bones and cartilage without using ...
— Pandemic • Jesse Franklin Bone

... already observed, go stark naked, and seem to have no more sense of indecency in discovering the whole body, than we have in discovering our hands and face. Their principal ornament is the bone which they thrust through the cartilage that divides the nostrils from each other: What perversion of taste could make them think this a decoration, or what could prompt them, before they had worn it or seen it worn, to suffer the pain ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 13 • Robert Kerr

... agriculture buffaloes are used instead of horses. They are very large animals, bigger and heavier than our largest oxen, furnished with great ears, and horns which project straight forward and bend inwards. A hole is bored through the cartilage of the nose, and these huge animals are guided by a cord which is passed through it. They have little eyes, and their colour is generally ashy grey. They are so accustomed to be led three times a day into the water to cool themselves, that they cannot without doing so be ...
— James Braithwaite, the Supercargo - The Story of his Adventures Ashore and Afloat • W.H.G. Kingston

... display the same progressive ascent from the brainless acrania, up through the fishes, batrachia, reptiles, and birds to the top in mammals. The same with the skeletons in the invertebrates, from membrane to cartilage, from cartilage to bone, so that the primitive cartilage remaining in any part of the skeleton is considered a mark ...
— Time and Change • John Burroughs

... through the nose cartilage of her child with a porcupine quill and then takes care that the wound heals quickly, without closing. Afterwards she passes through a ...
— My Friends the Savages - Notes and Observations of a Perak settler (Malay Peninsula) • Giovanni Battista Cerruti

... probably true explanation of the cause of old age is the gradual disappearance of animal matter in the bones and tissues, and the corresponding increase of the mineral matter in the bones and tissues, amounting to ossification of cartilage, whereby the supple cartilage, losing its animal content, becomes practically bone by deposit of lime particles. This would also account in a common-sense manner for the fragility of the bones of the aged, the brittleness being due to calcareous deposits in the substance ...
— The Goat-gland Transplantation • Sydney B. Flower

... that it was a very old one, lank, lean, and covered with long hair, raggled and torn into tufts. Its colour was that of the white dust, but red blood was streaming freshly down its hind flanks, and from its nose and mouth. The cartilage of the nose was torn to pieces by the fierce enemies it had so lately encountered, and on observing it more closely we saw that its eyes were pulled out of their sockets, exhibiting a fearful spectacle. The tail was eaten off by repeated wrenches, ...
— The Hunters' Feast - Conversations Around the Camp Fire • Mayne Reid

... guard, these savages had stealthily approached the camp, and discharged some arrows, one of which had penetrated the coverlet of one of the men, who was lying near the baggage, and had pierced the cartilage of his ear; the pain made him utter a sharp cry, which alarmed the whole camp and threw it into an uproar. The natives perceiving it, fled to the woods, howling and yelling like so many demons. In the morning our people picked up eight arrows round the camp: they could ...
— Narrative of a Voyage to the Northwest Coast of America in the years 1811, 1812, 1813, and 1814 or the First American Settlement on the Pacific • Gabriel Franchere

... a depth of 24 inches. One large tusk, that measured 7 ft. 8 in. in length, and 22 inches in girth, was imbedded in the head a depth of 31 inches. This will convey an idea of the enormous size of the head, and of the strength of bone and cartilage required to hold in position so great a weight, and to resist the strain when the tusk is used as a ...
— The Albert N'Yanza, Great Basin of the Nile • Sir Samuel White Baker

... itself was, how they were to get him along; when they broke in the onagra, they ran a prong through his ear; in reducing the buffalo to subjection, they did not feel the slightest compunction in thrusting a pin through the cartilage of his nose; then, in order to give elasticity to the legs of the ostrich, they yoked him to two or three other animals, and, willing or unwilling, he was compelled ultimately to yield obedience to the lords of creation. But whether the creature before them ...
— Willis the Pilot • Paul Adrien

... the Church of the Carmine, to learn drawing from the chapel of Masaccio. [1] It was Buonarroti's habit to banter all who were drawing there; and one day, among others, when he was annoying me, I got more angry than usual, and clenching my fist, gave him such a blow on the nose, that I felt bone and cartilage go down like biscuit beneath my knuckles; and this mark of mine he will carry with him to the grave." [2] These words begat in me such hatred of the man, since I was always gazing at the masterpieces of the divine Michel Agnolo, that although I felt a wish to go with him to England, ...
— The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini • Benvenuto Cellini



Words linked to "Cartilage" :   gristle, arytaenoid, cartilaginous, Adam's apple, costal cartilage, ground substance, hyaline cartilage, animal tissue, thyroid cartilage, matrix, arytenoid cartilage, cartilaginous structure



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