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pronoun
A  pron.  A barbarous corruption of have, of he, and sometimes of it and of they. "So would I a done" "A brushes his hat."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"A" Quotes from Famous Books



... to see Luton, Lord Bute's place; filled with very fine pictures, of which I have dreamt since. It is the gallery in England that I most wish to see again: but I by no means say it is the most valuable. A great many pictures seemed to me misnamed—especially Correggio has to answer for some he ...
— Letters of Edward FitzGerald - in two volumes, Vol. 1 • Edward FitzGerald

... he rose, and drew himself to his full height, and spread his bulky shoulders backward. His grey-blue eyes looked down upon her with a triumphant glow. ...
— The Market-Place • Harold Frederic

... know, we've stood a lot too much in that part of the world already, but we couldn't stand this; so about ten days ago an ultimatum was sent declaring that the British Government would consider any encroachment on the Yang-tse Valley as an ...
— A Honeymoon in Space • George Griffith

... in a moment of disoccupation before he went, and used a friend's right to recognize the brilliancy of her Thursday. She refused all merit for it and asked him if he had ever seen any thing like the contrast of Charmian at the ...
— The Coast of Bohemia • William Dean Howells

... was hardly anything the man could not do. He could draw the funniest pictures you ever saw—I wish I could reproduce the letters he sent his sons from the East. He was a good carpenter—the joy it meant to his soul to add a second-hand tool ever so often to his collection! Sunday morning was special carpenter-time—new shelves here, a bookcase there, new steps up to the swimming-tank, etc. I have heard many a man say that he told a story ...
— An American Idyll - The Life of Carleton H. Parker • Cornelia Stratton Parker

... with added flattery of his eyes which she did not take at all because she was passing her mother's plate for more gravy. How odd not to have a servant pass it! ...
— The City of Fire • Grace Livingston Hill

... it seems, had been murdered for her savings by a tramp near the spot where this strange occurrence took place, and it is thought that there is a connection between the crime and the haunting of this part of the Kimmage Road. Whatever the explanation may be, the whole story bears every evidence of truth, and it would be hard ...
— True Irish Ghost Stories • St John D Seymour

... turning the grindstone had with fighting in the lists; and the mistakes he made in spelling from right to left, and in confounding the letters, made him despair, and prepare for any amount of just indignation from his master; but he found on the contrary that Master Hansen had never had a pupil who made so few blunders on the first trial, and augured well of him from such a beginning. Paper was too costly, and pressure too difficult, for many proofs to be struck off, but Hansen could read and correct his type as it stood, and assured ...
— The Armourer's Prentices • Charlotte M. Yonge

... since the summoning of the Cambridge Synod had been under discussion throughout all New England were the right of non-covenanting parishioners in the choice of a minister, and the rights of children of baptized parents, that had not been admitted to full membership. These were the main topics of discussion in the Synod, or, more properly, Ministerial Convention, of 1657, which assembled in Boston, and which decreed the ...
— The Development of Religious Liberty in Connecticut • M. Louise Greene, Ph. D.

... on "The New South and the South of the Future" proved more than a document suited only to a reverent burial in the Congressional Record. Although wearied at the start owing to the exciting happenings of the day, the Mississippian's enthusiasm for his cause gave him strength and stimulation as he progressed. His voice rose majestically as ...
— A Gentleman from Mississippi • Thomas A. Wise

... turned his back upon the awful sight, and kept on running to and fro and up and down the street, clamouring like a madman for the police. Two sturdy constables presently came, their appearance restoring something like order. To them Tom o' the Gleam advanced, extending ...
— The Treasure of Heaven - A Romance of Riches • Marie Corelli

... received by the Boddingtons were disembarked a day or two after her arrival, and sent up to Toongabbie. On quitting the ship they with one voice bore testimony to the humane treatment they had received from Captain Chalmers, declaring that they had not any complaints to prefer, and cheering him when ...
— An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1 • David Collins

... to it by Lamarck, and not the false Charles-Darwinian natural selection that does not correspond with facts, and cannot result in specific differences such as we now observe. But, waiving this, the "my's," within which a little rift had begun to show itself in 1866, might well become as mute in 1869 as they could become without attracting attention, when Mr. Darwin saw the passages just quoted, and the hundred pages or ...
— Luck or Cunning? • Samuel Butler

... California, discharging fleets of icebergs into the sea, began to shallow and recede from the lowlands, and then move slowly up the flanks of the Sierra in compliance with the changes of climate. The great white mantle on the mountains broke up into a series of glaciers more or less distinct and river-like, with many tributaries, and these again were melted and divided into still smaller glaciers, until now only a few of the smallest residual topmost branches of the grand system exist on ...
— The Mountains of California • John Muir

... yet nothing newly has happened to me; but I come to confide to you that my old melancholy torments me more than usual. You know its nature, for my heart has always been opened to you; you know all which I have done to draw myself out of the crowd, and to acquire a name; and surely not without some success, since I have your testimony in my favour. Are you not the truest man, and the best of critics, who have never ceased to bestow on me your praise—and what need I ...
— Literary Character of Men of Genius - Drawn from Their Own Feelings and Confessions • Isaac D'Israeli

... strict religious ceremonies with which the Passion week was commemorated at the court of the youthful but pious Archduke Ferdinand were at an end; the black hangings disappeared from the church walls, and the bells rang out a merry peal in joyful commemoration of the Saviour's resurrection. The nobles and ladies of the court, wearied with the vigils and fasting which the religious zeal of the time rendered imperative, betook themselves with lightened hearts ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 341, March, 1844, Vol. 55 • Various

... are peculiar to Ireland. In many parts of the world where Ascendancies have existed, or exist, the same methods are employed, and always with a certain measure of success. Irish moral fibre was at least as tough as that of any other nationality in ...
— The Framework of Home Rule • Erskine Childers

... brought me news of it, and after I came to myself again, I thought I should have died with the weight of it. My governess acted a true mother to me; she pitied me, she cried with me, and for me, but she could not help me; and to add to the terror of it, 'twas the discourse all over the house that I should die for it. I could hear them talk it among ...
— The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders &c. • Daniel Defoe

... term Yankee is of local meaning. It is thought to be derived from the manner in which the Indians of New England pronounced the word English, or Yengeese. New York being originally a Dutch province, the term of course was not known there, and Farther south different dialects among the natives themselves probably produced a different pronunciation Marmaduke and his cousin, being Pennsylvanians by birth, were not Yankees in the ...
— The Pioneers • James Fenimore Cooper

... ease of manner which always indicates a long friendship, or a close camaraderie, resulting from common interests or ...
— The Last Hope • Henry Seton Merriman

... had a farewell breakfast at his club with Doodles, and after that, having spent the intervening hours in the billiard-room, a farewell luncheon. There had been something of melancholy in this last day between the friends, ...
— The Claverings • Anthony Trollope

... said a third voice, "hath never forgiven Calista and me, since we told your Majesty that she dropped two ...
— The Talisman • Sir Walter Scott

... perhaps make her happy again. Marriage was hardly considered the outcome of love in that period, many other considerations entered into it. There were betrothals where the future husband and wife saw each other for the first time. And they did very well. His ideas of married life were a sort of good-fellowship and admiration, if the woman was pretty; good cooking and a desire to please among the commoner ones. At four and twenty he had not given the matter much consideration. Madame Giffard was full thirty, but she looked like a girl in her lightness and grace. And he ...
— A Little Girl in Old Quebec • Amanda Millie Douglas

... what David, coming to the house sometimes, and Hugh going every afternoon to the cottage, made between them. Hugh often went to the knees in snow, but was well dried and warmed by Janet's care when he arrived. She had always a pair of stockings and slippers ready for him at the fire, to be put on the moment of his arrival; and exchanged again for his own, dry and warm, before he footed once more the ghostly waste. When neither moon was up nor stars were out, there ...
— David Elginbrod • George MacDonald

... runs along the Hawthorn Ridge-top for some hundreds of yards, and then crosses a dip or valley, which is the broad, fanshaped, southern end of a fork of Y Ravine. A road runs, or ran, down this dip into the Y Ravine. It is not now recognisable as a road, but the steep banks at each side of it, and some bluish metalling in the shell holes, show ...
— The Old Front Line • John Masefield

... familiar with the great names of the continent. "Pardon me, but that was once a famous ...
— The Puppet Crown • Harold MacGrath

... the churchyard, the funeral procession had just arrived at its destination, and the bearers were carrying the coffin from the hearse to the church door. He stopped a little by the road-side to see it go in. "She was no good to anybody about her, all her lifetime," he thought bitterly, as the last heavy fold of the velvet pall was lost to view in the darkness of the church entrance. "But if she'd only lived a day or two longer, she might have been of ...
— Hide and Seek • Wilkie Collins

... was the most noted of these since the death of McNeil, and as the scouts had reported him in Harrisonburg the latter part of January, I directed two of the most trustworthy to be sent to watch his movements and ascertain his purposes. In a few days these spies returned with the intelligence that Gilmore was on his way to Moorefield, the centre of a very disloyal section in West Virginia, about ninety miles southwest of Winchester, where, under the guise of a camp-meeting, ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... ground pretty well, and could drop twenty feet out of the barn window and strike on a pile of straw so as to land near the goal, touch it, and let the crowd in free without getting found out. I did this several times and got the blinder, James Bang, pretty mad. After a boy has counted 500 or 600, and worked hard to gather in the crowd, only to get jeered and laughed ...
— Remarks • Bill Nye

... Saturday April morning was one man at least, Zachariah Coleman by name, who did not hooray, and did not lift his hat even when the Sacred Majesty appeared on the hotel steps. He was a smallish, thin-faced, lean creature in workman's clothes; his complexion was white, blanched by office air, and his hands were ...
— The Revolution in Tanner's Lane • Mark Rutherford

... The turnkey's candle made a star-point in the corridor. He walked ahead of the priest and I walked behind. We descended to the entrance where the man with the big book sat taking stock of another wretch between officers. I saw as I shaded my face with the load, that his inattentive eye ...
— Lazarre • Mary Hartwell Catherwood

... nodded carelessly, but even a careless glance told her that there was not the sign of a grouch on Mrs. Schuneman's fat red face that day. Indeed, it quite beamed with friendliness as she hoped that they would have a ...
— Mary Rose of Mifflin • Frances R. Sterrett

... him at Lysia, seeming to note every jewel on her dress, every curve of her body, every slight gesture of her hand, every faint, cold smile that played on her lovely lips. One young man whom the others addressed as Ormaz, a haughty, handsome fellow enough, though with rather a sneering mouth just visible under his black mustache, was talking somewhat excitedly on the subject of Khosrul's cunningly devised flight, . . for it seemed to be universally understood that the venerable Prophet was one of the Circle of Mystics,—persons ...
— Ardath - The Story of a Dead Self • Marie Corelli

... not so often what will the Lords do with the Bill? but what shall we do with the House of Lords? At every great popular meeting held throughout the constituencies an outcry was raised against the House of Lords as a part of the constitutional system, and no speaker was more welcome on a public platform than the orator who called for the abolition of the hereditary principle in the formation of legislators. One might have thought that the agitation which ...
— A History of the Four Georges and of William IV, Volume IV (of 4) • Justin McCarthy and Justin Huntly McCarthy

... time, Richardson's novels alone excited his admiration. He could see little or no merit in Tom Jones, in Gulliver's Travels, or in Tristram Shandy. To Thomson's Castle of Indolence he vouchsafed only a line of cold commendation—of commendation much colder than what he has bestowed on The Creation of that portentous bore, Sir Richard Blackmore. Gray was, in his dialect, a barren rascal. Churchill was a blockhead. The contempt which he felt for Macpherson was, indeed, just; but it was, we suspect, ...
— Books and Authors - Curious Facts and Characteristic Sketches • Anonymous

... bands of green (top), white, and black with a gold emblem centered on the three bands; the emblem features a temple-like structure with Islamic inscriptions above and below, encircled by a wreath on the left and right and by a bolder Islamic inscription above, all of which are encircled by two ...
— The 2001 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... a sigh of overtasked patience, smiled with a baffled air, seemed once or twice about to speak, but doubtful what to say, and let his ...
— Dr. Sevier • George W. Cable

... fly the Sections, energetically demanding him back; demanding not arrestment of Popular Magistrates, but of a traitorous Twenty-two. Section comes flying after Section;—defiling energetic, with their Cambyses' vein of oratory: nay the Commune itself comes, with Mayor Pache at its head; and with question not of Hebert and the Twenty-two alone, but with ...
— The French Revolution • Thomas Carlyle

... Apothecary, at the Unicorn in Southwark, having about Christmas last Published in the Postman, Tatler and Courant, a long Advertisement of his large Experience and great Success in curing the Small-Pox, even of the worst Kind and Circumstances, having had a Reputation for it almost 30 years, and can say than not 3 in ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... of any magazine editor dealing with current events. In eight years the "New Haven" had increased its capitalization 1501 per cent; and what that meant, any office boy in "the Street" could have told. What attitude should a magazine ...
— The Profits of Religion, Fifth Edition • Upton Sinclair

... me smite The Wa-bish-kiz-zee[118] in their sight! Did Europe come to crush us dead, Because on flying deer we fed, And worshipped gods of airy forms, Who ride in thunder-clouds, the storms? Because we use not plough or loom, Is ours a black and bitter doom That has no light—no world of bliss?— Then is ...
— The Myth of Hiawatha, and Other Oral Legends, Mythologic and Allegoric, of the North American Indians • Henry R. Schoolcraft

... perjurer," he said to himself; "I am only a coward, a simpleton, who is afraid of the mere shadow of a deed. Ought I not proudly and joyfully to have sworn a false oath for Elsbeth's sake? Then I should be somebody; then I should have done something, while now I live on, torpid ...
— Dame Care • Hermann Sudermann

... she asked lightly. "I've got some bromo-seltzer. I'll give you a shot; it will liven you up. Don't want to go down and out so early in the evening, ...
— The She Boss - A Western Story • Arthur Preston Hankins

... so confidently relied, proved one of the chief causes of their defeat. Too crowded either to advance or to retreat, their oars broken or impeded by collision with one another, their fleet lay like an inert and lifeless mass upon the water, and fell an easy prey to the Greeks. A single incident will illustrate the terror and confusion which reigned among the Persians. Artemisia, queen of Halicarnassus in Caria, distinguished herself in it by deeds of daring bravery. At length she turned and fled, pursued by an Athenian galley. Full in her course lay the vessel of a Carian ...
— A Smaller History of Greece • William Smith

... honour, and nothing was thought too good for this wonderful painter, who could make pictures which looked like living men. The Sultan loaded him with gifts and favours, and he lived there like a royal prince. Each picture painted by Gentile was thought more wonderful than the last. He painted a portrait of the Sultan, and even one of himself, which was considered little ...
— Knights of Art - Stories of the Italian Painters • Amy Steedman

... fire woman, who nodded a pleasant good-bye to us, and willingly put our stivers in her great outside pocket, we drove through the streets enjoying the singular sights of a public washing day. Yes, in certain quarters of the ...
— Hans Brinker - or The Silver Skates • Mary Mapes Dodge

... by the Subject, is not the verb "are" (or "is"), substitute for it a phrase beginning ...
— Symbolic Logic • Lewis Carroll

... in my office that I had just time to catch the eleven-nine if I should not be delayed. Therefore, as soon as I was outside the building I started to run, but when I reached the corner and was just about to step on a passing street-car a hand was laid on my arm, and I turned to see who was seeking to detain me. It was a woman in the most pitiable rags, and on her arm she carried a baby so thin and pale that I could scarcely believe ...
— The Water Goats and Other Troubles • Ellis Parker Butler

... your determination to return to your father, a very wise one. I shall advise the Chief Executor to that effect. And I shall also see that a cabin is reserved for you on the first out-going steamer, and I'll ...
— Peg O' My Heart • J. Hartley Manners

... flayed and boned, and six good large tenches, scale, splat, and bone them, cut off the heads and fins, as also of the eels; cut both eels, and tenches a handful long, & season them with pepper, salt and nutmeg; then lay some butter in the bottom of the pie, lay a lay of eels, and then a lay of tench, thus do five or six layings, lay on the top large mace, & whole cloves and on that butter, close it up and bake ...
— The accomplisht cook - or, The art & mystery of cookery • Robert May

... late Lord Salisbury, both in his speaking and in his conversation. I had a kind of feeling that he could always score off me with such grace, good humour and wit that I would never discover it. He asked me once what my husband thought of his son Hugh's speaking, ...
— Margot Asquith, An Autobiography: Volumes I & II • Margot Asquith

... it worth while to polish the pretty pebbles which are found on some shores, but this process is both tedious and unprofitable. In these days there are few children who do not possess a microscope; those who do will find innumerable interesting objects both for mounting ...
— Little Folks - A Magazine for the Young (Date of issue unknown) • Various

... was not finished, however, when the singing was at last taught by rule, and the singers were allowed to sit together and form a choir. There still existed the odious custom of "lining" or "deaconing" the psalm. To this fashion may be attributed the depraved condition of church-singing of which Walters so forcibly wrote, and while it continued the case ...
— Sabbath in Puritan New England • Alice Morse Earle

... writes in A.D. 57 or earlier, that another, Who had died in A.D. 32 had been seen by a number of persons, and among these, by 500 persons at once, of whom the greater part were alive when he wrote, and implying that the story had been believed ever since, and received by him (the writer) from ...
— The Lost Gospel and Its Contents - Or, The Author of "Supernatural Religion" Refuted by Himself • Michael F. Sadler

... general was prohibited from leading his army into the city of Rome. The emperor, chief of all the armies, had at Rome his military escort (praetorium), a body of about 10,000 men quartered in the interior of the city. The praetorians, recruited among the veterans, received high pay and frequent donatives. Relying on these soldiers, the emperor had nothing to fear from malcontents in Rome. But the danger came from the ...
— History Of Ancient Civilization • Charles Seignobos

... long letters to their friends when they've nothing to say, and I don't think their friendships suffer by it. And though there are heaps of idle gossiping fellows, as well as ladies with the same qualities, a man who was busy would never tolerate them to his own inconvenience, much less invite them to persecute him. We are more straightforward with each other, and that is, after all, the firmest foundation for friendship. It is partly a misplaced amiability, a phase of the ...
— Six to Sixteen - A Story for Girls • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... crowd of boys and some men came out and ran along with us, and dived in for anything we threw overboard. They swam like ducks of course. All the boys and most of the men were quite naked, which is a thing you never see in India. Any boy over twelve there has a loin-cloth. There seemed to be very few men about: a lot of women came to the doors of their huts. They made no attempt to veil their faces, which even the beggar women in Basra did. Only one girl ...
— Letters from Mesopotamia • Robert Palmer

... among the trees, clear for a moment, then hidden, then visible knee-deep in ferns, then gone again, ran a man. She knew it was young Ugh-lomi by the fair colour of his hair, and there was red upon his face. Somehow his frantic flight and that scarlet mark made her feel ...
— Tales of Space and Time • Herbert George Wells

... usual time she expected a visit from the Lion, but no Lion appeared. Beauty, wondering what all this could mean, now reproached herself for her ingratitude in not having returned as she promised. She feared the poor Beast had died of grief, and she thought ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... "Now that I have a little daughter, I must learn all your stories, Nokomis," said Good Bird. "Suppose you tell one ...
— Two Indian Children of Long Ago • Frances Taylor

... a man familiar with fair heights That poets climb. Upon his peace the tears And troubles of our race deep inroads made, Yet life was sweet to him; he kept his heart At home. Who saw his wife might well have thought,— "God ...
— Poems by Jean Ingelow, In Two Volumes, Volume I. • Jean Ingelow

... he was playing it prestissimo. One of the boys, Giulio, dropped out exhausted. Then another, Alfio, fell against the terrace wall, laughing and wiping his streaming face. Finally Giuseppe gave in, too, obviously against his will. But Gaspare and Maurice still kept on. The game was certainly a duel now—a duel which would not cease till Sebastiano put an end to it by laying down his flute. But he, too, was on his mettle and would not own fatigue. Suddenly Hermione felt that she could not bear the dance any more. It was, perhaps, absurd of her. ...
— The Call of the Blood • Robert Smythe Hichens

... died at Verdun defending the slogan, 'They shall not pass.' More than a million English and Canadians died on the Somme, reforming their ranks, and hurling back the challenge, 'They shall not pass.' They were possessed of the crusading spirit; they were preserving the Democracy of the world, the very Government of the earth. And now another menace is threatened, and ...
— The Progressive Democracy of James M. Cox • Charles E. Morris

... estimate of Major Powell amounts fully to one hundred inches of water per annum. If the vapors arising from this enormous evaporation should all be condensed into clouds and converted into rain it would create a rainy season that would last throughout ...
— Arizona Sketches • Joseph A. Munk

... "Solicit a donkey!" irascibly uttered Miss Corny, for the tidings did not meet her approbation. "Did Archibald ...
— East Lynne • Mrs. Henry Wood

... had been consumed, as though it were straw, and not a drop remained. She passed her ...
— The Magician • Somerset Maugham

... These usually refer to a group of congenial persons, numbering from four to twenty-four, and visiting country homes, making a stay of a few days or a ...
— The Book of Good Manners • W. C. Green

... that the Friendly societies exist solely among the freed negroes, and that the moneys are raised exclusively among them. Among whom? A people who are said to be so proverbially improvident, that to emancipate them, would be to abandon them to beggary, nakedness, and starvation;—a people who "cannot take care of themselves;" who "will ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... people here, I may say all the elite of the evangelical circles, including Mrs Perch—[Mrs Perch was the coachmaker's wife, who had always been so true to Mrs Stumfold]—desired that I should establish a church here, on my own bottom, quite independent of Mr Stumfold. The Stumfolds would then soon have to leave Littlebath, there is no doubt of that, and she has already made herself so unendurable, and her father ...
— Miss Mackenzie • Anthony Trollope

... it upon their consciences that these lawless ruffians should suffer for a crime which ...
— Jack Harkaway and his son's Escape From the Brigand's of Greece • Bracebridge Hemyng

... the hell is it to you?" he asked unpleasantly, and I stammered out some kind of apology. Far be it from me to pry into a man's past. ...
— The Range Dwellers • B. M. Bower

... king, who had three daughters—that is, he would have had three, if he had had one more, but some how or other the eldest never was born. She was extremely handsome, had a great deal of wit, and spoke French in perfection, as all the authors of that age affirm, and yet none of them pretend that she ever existed. It is very certain that the two other princesses were far from beauties; the second had a strong Yorkshire dialect, and the youngest ...
— Hieroglyphic Tales • Horace Walpole

... had some little comfort remaining, for there was an m wanting—people always wrote Pommern, not Pomern—therefore by this the All-merciful God showed that He meant to preserve one m, that is, a man, of the noble Pomeranian house, whereby to build it up and make it flourishing again. To this faith he clung in his sore grief; and Doctor Joel further comforted him about the angel, saying that he would assuredly tell ...
— Sidonia The Sorceress V2 • William Mienhold

... doorway of his dining-room; the streams of men we had seen going in and out were the fed and the unfed guests of the house. It was supper time; we also were hungry. We peered into the dining room: three tables full of men; a huge pile of beds on the floor, covered with hats and coats; a singular wall, made entirely of doors propped upright; a triangular space walled off by sailcloth,—this is what we saw. We stood outside, waiting among the scaffolding and benches. A black man ...
— McGuffey's Sixth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... Englishman; and though it was so large an undertaking, it appears to have been commenced and completed between the years 1174 and 1184. This would very naturally exert some influence upon the building projects of a neighbouring see. Whether any of the actual craftsmen from Canterbury worked again at Chichester or not we cannot tell, but it is evident that the Kentish experience was of great help to Sussex in the new venture. When it had been decided ...
— Bell's Cathedrals: Chichester (1901) - A Short History & Description Of Its Fabric With An Account Of The - Diocese And See • Hubert C. Corlette

... ride I had a visit from Captain F——, the manager of a neighbouring plantation, with whom I had a long conversation about the present and past condition of the estate, the species of feudal magnificence in which ...
— Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation - 1838-1839 • Frances Anne Kemble

... said with a gasp. "But it's being pinned in here. I thought I was going to be pinned down ...
— Martin Hyde, The Duke's Messenger • John Masefield

... as in others, add something new to what is already known, and this to a larger extent ...
— A History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century, Volume I (of 6) • Leopold von Ranke

... to see if I could get one or two decent ties to wear,—you can get nothing out there,—then I thought I'd have a look and see how London was ...
— The Atlantic Book of Modern Plays • Various

... already recorded, was in good order; it was fortunate that the soldiers had been practised in loading, leading, and tending the animals, for the Afghan drivers deserted to a man a march or two from Kabul, and the Hazaras followed their example on reaching their own country. Sir Donald Stewart's account of the troubles he had encountered during his march from Kandahar was not very encouraging, and I should have ...
— Forty-one years in India - From Subaltern To Commander-In-Chief • Frederick Sleigh Roberts

... Ashton-Kirk, smiling. "But there are certain almost unmistakable indications. One of these I brought about by my confidence to the police regarding the possibility of a woman being connected with the case. I felt that if he believed his sister guilty that this would stir him to some further action. It did, as you know. He instantly canceled his denials, and admitted ...
— Ashton-Kirk, Criminologist • John T. McIntyre

... about Arthur's weapons. His burny, he says (vs. 21133-34) "was named Wygar" (Anglo-Saxon wigheard), "Battle-hard," "which Witeze wrought," Witeze being a corrupted form for Widia, the Anglo-Saxon name of the son of Weland, the Teutonic Vulcan, a famous maker of magic weapons in romance, with whom his son might easily become ...
— Arthurian Chronicles: Roman de Brut • Wace

... I never could by any chance or possibility have got beyond it or got any suggestion of the Reality had I been merely related to my Presentment as a passive and percipient subject. In point of fact, however, I am in relation with the energetic system not merely or primarily as an Intelligence percipient of the transmutations proceeding in it at a particular ...
— Essays Towards a Theory of Knowledge • Alexander Philip

... man thinking it also worth his curiosity, resolved to do the same, and took his seat by them. They had scarcely begun to converse together, when there arrived a third old man leading a mule. He addressed himself to the two former, and asked why the merchant who sat with them looked so melancholy? They told him the reason, which appeared to him so extraordinary, that he also resolved to witness the result; and for that purpose ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Complete • Anonymous

... I see already by his looks that this letter disturbs him. What a wonderfully jealous temper he has! (Aloud). What stops you, Prince, in the midst of ...
— Don Garcia of Navarre • Moliere

... human will and effort to save her. Would that I had the faith in God that I ought to have! But He is afar off, and He acts in accordance with an infinite wisdom that I can't understand. The happiness of His creatures seems a very secondary affair." ...
— His Sombre Rivals • E. P. Roe

... little has been written or published with reference to the history of the development of the idea of a written constitution. The student will find some suggestive hints in Hannis Taylor's Origin and Growth of the English Constitution, vol. i, Boston, 1889. See Henry Hitchcock's American State Constitutions; a Study of their Growth, N.Y., 1887, a learned ...
— Civil Government in the United States Considered with - Some Reference to Its Origins • John Fiske

... chiefs, called by them datos, who governed them and were captains in their wars, and whom they obeyed and reverenced. The subject who committed any offense against them, or spoke but a word to their wives and children, was ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, V7, 1588-1591 • Emma Helen Blair

... out their hands, plucked my beard, or seized my clothes; and I should have been stifled by their too warm onset, had not he, shouting out, dispersed them all. Such usefulness has that column, which is mocked at by scornful men, poured forth; and so great a ray of the knowledge of God has it sent forth ...
— The Hermits • Charles Kingsley

... room. 'You see this vast establishment,' he began; 'you can possibly estimate to some extent the immense stake I have in its prosperity and success. Your excellent natural sense will tell you that the Principal of this Sanitarium must be a man of the ...
— Armadale • Wilkie Collins

... you. I see (pointing to the glass with her finger) a sight that beggars all description; and yet listen, and I will paint it for you, if I can. It is a lonely spot; tall mountains, crowned with verdure, rise in awful sublimity around; a river runs through, and bright flowers in wild profusion grow to the water's edge. There is a thick, warm mist, ...
— The Canadian Elocutionist • Anna Kelsey Howard

... investigation into the pretended titles to property, and its fabulous and perhaps scandalous history. They wish to hold to this proposition: that property is a fact; that it always has been, and always will be. With that proposition the savant Proudhon [11] commenced his "Treatise on the Right of Usufruct," regarding the origin of property as a useless question. Perhaps I would subscribe to this doctrine, believing it inspired by a commendable ...
— What is Property? - An Inquiry into the Principle of Right and of Government • P. J. Proudhon

... history of that tree is not known, but it reaches back prior to the settlement of Boston. It was a good sized tree in 1656. "A map of Boston made in 1722 showed the tree as one of the principal objects." That tree is a sacred relic of the past. Its branches waved over the heads ...
— The Bark Covered House • William Nowlin

... colleagues now decided to strike at the leaders who were planning a British Convention. Of these the most formidable was the Secretary of the London Corresponding Society. Accordingly, early on 12th May, some Bow Street officers made their way into Hardy's shop, No. 9, Piccadilly, ...
— William Pitt and the Great War • John Holland Rose

... white to the lips. "Get me to bed!" she muttered. "Get me to bed!" She had lost the power even to stand. That she had ever borne, even for a yard, the great pot which it taxed Anne's utmost strength to carry upstairs was a miracle. But a miracle were all the circumstances connected with ...
— The Long Night • Stanley Weyman

... "If I did I shouldn't let you know it. I'm a homeless beggar, anyhow; I've always been living in boarding-houses and clubs and hotels; it won't matter so long as you are ...
— The Lure of the Mask • Harold MacGrath

... a condition of applique, and couched cord fulfils it most perfectly. Much depends upon a tasteful and tactful choice of colour for it. You fatten your pattern by outlining it with a colour which goes with it (Illustration 62, B). You thin it by one which goes into the ground. ...
— Art in Needlework - A Book about Embroidery • Lewis F. Day

... Hale, says that a woman at Dorchester, and another at Cambridge, were executed, not far from this time, for witchcraft; and that they asserted their innocence with their dying breath. He also says, that, in 1650, "a poor wretch,—Mary Oliver,—probably weary of her life from the general reputation ...
— Salem Witchcraft, Volumes I and II • Charles Upham

... a sudden sound of weeping made them all start, thinking for a moment that it must be Hoodie herself, who had run back from the nursery. But no—it was not Hoodie—it was Hec. The little fellow had crept under the table unobserved, and there had been ...
— Hoodie • Mary Louisa Stewart Molesworth

... mounted on superb horses, and brandishing spears, dashed past the cars, shouting continuously what would be the equivalent of "clear the way" in English, just as to the sound of shouting and singing, the beating of drums, and clashing of cymbals, a stream of natives, dancing and waving their arms, ...
— Desert Love • Joan Conquest

... cavern I found no sign of any one, and I was wondering what could have become of my companions when I heard a voice calling low ...
— Hurricane Island • H. B. Marriott Watson

... the entire block. They will be found to be exactly the same distance. Or take any of the horizontal strokes of the four letters and see how far their extremities are from the top and bottom of the entire block. It will be found that a line joining the extremities of the strokes are strictly parallel to the top or bottom and that they are not on a slant at all. It is the slant of the numerous short lines that go to make up the letter as a whole that deceives ...
— The Boy Mechanic: Volume 1 - 700 Things For Boys To Do • Popular Mechanics

... squandered. They seem to be sowing seed not upon the Nile, to find it again abundantly, but in midocean, to sink and come to naught. Parents and teachers break their hearts, fearing their watchfulness and instruction have failed. Men sow wheat and wait six months for a harvest; but they sow moral seed Sunday and on Monday whip their children because the seed has not ripened. They forget that apples bitter in July may be sweet in August. To-day's vice in the child is often to-morrow's virtue, as acid juices through frost become saccharine. Yesterday ...
— The Investment of Influence - A Study of Social Sympathy and Service • Newell Dwight Hillis

... 'It is a question, sir, that just at present I prefer to ask you. Now, sir, be good enough to tell the jury, whence Mr. Tudor got that money; or tell them, if you dare do so, that you ...
— The Three Clerks • Anthony Trollope

... vest and collars and flowing hair beseen. "What is thy name?" I asked her, and she replied, "I'm she Who burns the hearts of lovers on coals of love and teen." I made my moan unto her of passion and desire; "Upon a rock," she answered, "thy plaints are wasted clean." "Even if thy heart," I told her, "be rock in very deed, Yet hath God made fair water well from ...
— The Book Of The Thousand Nights And One Night, Volume II • Anonymous

... further off by the coach-house, similar scenes were transpiring. Never had that quiet casa de campo known so much noise. For the soldiers had got among them—it was the house of a rebel, and ...
— The Free Lances - A Romance of the Mexican Valley • Mayne Reid

... doubt I do a great many things which none of the other girls do, so I might as well do this. I don't object to ...
— Elizabeth Hobart at Exeter Hall • Jean K. Baird

... tumult it is doubtful if any heard the three quickly repeated blows that fell heavily from the outside upon the big doors of the barn. If they did, it was already too late to mend matters, for the door fell, torn from its hinges, and as it fell a captain of police sprang into the light from out of the storm, with his lieutenants and their men crowding ...
— Gallegher and Other Stories • Richard Harding Davis

... words I heard, uttered in English, as all their talk was when they were moved or excited, "if you would only explain! If you would only tell me why you do not wish me to receive letters from him! But this silence—this love and this silence are killing me. I cannot bear it. I feel like a lost child who hears its mother's voice in the darkness, but does not know how to follow that voice to ...
— The Forsaken Inn - A Novel • Anna Katharine Green

... been again scheming in order to be declared Queen; that the King had had the weakness to promise she should be, and that the declaration was about to be made. He put some papers in his hand, and at once went straight to the King, who was in a very private room. Seeing Louvois at an unexpected hour, he asked him what brought him there. "Something pressing and important," replied Louvois, with a sad manner that astonished the King, and induced him to command the valets present to quit ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... James Grierson, General Manager of the Great Western, was the principal witness for the railway companies, and yeoman service he rendered. He presented the railway case with great ability, and his views were accepted on the important terminal question. In 1886 he published a book on Railway Rates, which was warmly welcomed by the Press and, in the words of Herepath's Journal, was "an exhaustive, able, and dispassionate resume of all the conflicting statements, claims, and interests verging round the much vexed question of railway rates." Certainly ...
— Fifty Years of Railway Life in England, Scotland and Ireland • Joseph Tatlow

... to our troubles, cholera broke out amongst some Nepalese coolies on their way to join us; out of 840, 251 died in a few days, and a number deserted panic-stricken, while the rest were so weakened and shaken that, notwithstanding the care bestowed upon them by their able and energetic Commandant, Major H. Moore, only 387 joined ...
— Forty-one years in India - From Subaltern To Commander-In-Chief • Frederick Sleigh Roberts

... the same answer to any one who tried to comfort her. And then one afternoon Mr. Russell appeared on the scene. When he heard from nurse how matters lay, he proposed that Betty should come and stay with him for a week. 'It is change of scene and atmosphere that she wants. Let me take her back with me at once; my housekeeper will take good care of her.' And this was managed, and Betty walked away ...
— Odd • Amy Le Feuvre

... A return to the rest of the English, with some further accounts of them. And some further Discourse of the ...
— An Historical Relation Of The Island Ceylon In The East Indies • Robert Knox

... Dick watched for a time, afraid to touch her, lest by some horrible mischance she should wake up and recommence the terrible scene that had just been concluded, and at least half an hour elapsed before he could muster up courage to undress her and put her ...
— A Mummer's Wife • George Moore

... the breadth of the tower is about forty cubits, and the length thereof two hundred cubits. At every ten cubits' distance there are slopes which go round the tower by which one can ascend to the top[138]. One can see from there a view twenty miles in extent, as the land is level. There fell fire from heaven into the midst of the tower which split it to its ...
— The Itinerary of Benjamin of Tudela • Benjamin of Tudela

... men it is a Christian duty to think that we shall be righteous and sacred because of our works; but to believe that these things are given by the grace of God, they condemn as heretical; attributing that to their own works which they do not attribute ...
— The World's Great Sermons, Volume I - Basil to Calvin • Various



Words linked to "A" :   A'man, for a song, turn a loss, turn a profit, in a pig's eye, degree of a polynomial, take a look, Saint Thomas a Becket, in a flash, feel like a million, as a group, strike a chord, love-in-a-mist, chlorophyll a, A-list, have a look, A-horizon, Al-Jama'a al-Islamiyyah al-Muqatilah bi-Libya, take a powder, strike a note, a priori, a Kempis, have a fit, time and a half, purine, eigenvalue of a square matrix, to a lower place, characteristic root of a square matrix, turn a trick, nm, hardly a, cock-a-hoop, catch a glimpse, a la mode, as a formality, make a motion, give a damn, get a load, blow a fuse, even a little, al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya, immunoglobulin A, drop a line, in a bad way, page-at-a-time printer, biochemistry, naked as a jaybird, line-at-a-time printer, explode a bombshell, a couple of, a fortiori, throw a fit, pig-a-back, A level, run a risk, pit-a-pat, roman a clef, on a lower floor, hepatitis A virus, a trifle, lobster a la Newburg, quite a, make a clean breast of, A-one, take a firm stand, chock-a-block, on a regular basis, a lot, turn a nice dollar, to a higher place, type A, do a job on, paint a picture, go a long way, broth of a boy, bric-a-brac, current unit, tete a tete, hang by a hair, like a shot, send a message, once in a while, rat-a-tat-tat, a la carte, folie a deux, get a line, on a higher floor, A-scan ultrasonography, give a hang, take a breather, in a heartfelt way, cap-a-pie, a great deal, get a whiff, by a long shot, dehydroretinol, grind to a halt, beyond a doubt, play a trick on, object of a preposition, 5-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, draw a blank, after a fashion, call it a day, in a nutshell, touch a chord, high-muck-a-muck, hemophilia A, pied-a-terre, take a bow, a cappella, deoxyadenosine monophosphate, get a look, micromillimetre, millimicron, for a while, a posteriori, take a joke, micromicron, turn a nice dime, botulinum toxin A, provitamin A, have a go at it, in a broad way, St. Thomas a Becket, hepatitis A, make a face, bright as a new penny, moment of a couple, element of a cylinder, drag a bunt, micromillimeter, turn a blind eye, draw a line



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